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  Oct 19, 2017
 
 
    
2009-2010 Undergraduate Bulletin [ARCHIVED BULLETIN]

Hofstra College of Liberal Arts and Sciences


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Office: Second Floor, Heger Hall
Telephone: (516) 463-5412
Bernard J. Firestone, Dean
Barbara Bohannon, Associate Dean
Gail Schwab, Associate Dean
Richard Apollo, Senior Assistant Dean

Mission Statement

Hofstra College of Liberal Arts and Sciences is dedicated to the genesis of knowledge and creative works in the humanities, natural sciences, and social sciences, and to the transmission, preservation, analysis and evaluation of knowledge and creative works within the Hofstra University academic community and across larger regional and global communities. The following principles guide the mission of HCLAS:

  • The liberal arts are the foundation for all higher education. The main objective of a liberal arts education is to enable students, working with faculty and with one another in an atmosphere of freedom and tolerance, to gain an understanding of how people have attempted throughout history to render the breadth of human experience intelligible. To that end, students explore the various ways in which the human mind has engaged, and continues to engage, its physical and social environment through art, literature, philosophical and historical inquiry, scientific and mathematical reasoning, and social scientific analysis. A liberal arts education develops critical thinking skills and the ability to access and analyze information and ideas in a technologically sophisticated world. Students also master the oral and written communication skills required for active ethical participation in a society characterized by increasing interdependence and diversity. Thus, HCLAS graduates emerge as life-long learners who are intellectually ambitious and adaptable to change. HCLAS is further committed to broadly cultivating the moral judgment, aesthetic sensibilities, and emotional maturity of students to prepare them for lives of social responsibility as members of their local, national and global communities.
  • HCLAS faculty are members of two academic communities, one internal to Hofstra University, the other composed of the web of scholars and professionals external to Hofstra University. As members of the former, HCLAS faculty are committed to contributing to the academic environment of Hofstra University through excellence in teaching, mentoring and interdisciplinary engagement. As members of the latter, HCLAS faculty are committed to the production and dissemination of knowledge and creative works beyond the Hofstra campus.
  • Within the context of its liberal arts mission, HCLAS is committed to the development and support of selected preprofessional programs, both graduate and undergraduate, that further the career aspirations of students and that meet the needs of society. The purpose of anchoring pre-professional programs to the liberal arts is to awaken and develop the students’ intellectual powers before they enter upon their chosen careers, ensuring that each student brings to his or her profession the greatest possible assets of intelligence, resourcefulness, judgment, and character.
  • HCLAS recognizes that academic excellence is nurtured in a community of scholars united in the common goal of mutual enlightenment. To that end, HCLAS is committed to attracting, supporting, and retaining a diverse community of talented students and distinguished faculty.

The Hofstra College of Liberal Arts and Sciences is made up of the Division of the Humanities; the Division of the Natural Sciences, Mathematics, Engineering and Computer Science; the Division of the Social Sciences; and the Division of New College. In addition, Military Science is under the supervision of the College.

For the College’s academic organization, see below; for the University’s academic organization see the “Academic Organization” section of this Bulletin.

Students should consult the Semester Planning Guide for specific offerings before registering for their programs.

Division of the Humanities

The Division of the Humanities has three related objectives that apply to every student who takes courses within this area: first, to strengthen communication skills; second, to develop the capacities of logic, sensibility, imagination, and receptivity within the fields of experience common to all educated persons; third, to provide specialized preprofessional training that conforms to the preceding objectives and to departmental subject matters. The following areas and departments make up this division:

Comparative Literature and Languages
    Arabic
    Asian Studies
    Chinese
    Classics
    Comparative Literature
    English Language Program
    German
    Greek
    Hebrew
    Japanese
    Latin
    Linguistics
    Literature in Translation
    Modern Greek
    Russian
    Swahili
Drama and Dance
English
    Creative Writing
Fine Arts/Art History/Comparative Arts and Culture
Music
Romance Languages and Literatures
    French
    French Literature in Translation
    Italian
    Italian Literature in Translation
    Italian American Studies
    Latin American and Caribbean Studies
    Portuguese
    Spanish
        Ibero-American Studies
        Spanish Literature in Translation
Writing Studies and Composition

Division of the Natural Sciences, Mathematics, Engineering And Computer Science

The Division of Natural Sciences, Mathematics, Engineering and Computer Science prepares students for careers in the sciences and for professional schools; gives students professional training in engineering; and offers courses to foster an understanding of science and mathematics to students outside the sciences. The following areas and departments make up this division:

Biology
    Physician Assistant Studies
    Urban Ecology
Chemistry
    Biochemistry
    Forensic Science
    Natural Science
Computer Science
    Computer Engineering
    Computer Science
    Computer Science and Mathematics
Engineering
    Electrical Engineering
    Engineering Science
        Biomedical Engineering
        Civil Engineering
    Industrial Engineering
    Mechanical Engineering
    Technology and Public Policy
Geology
    Environmental Resources
Mathematics
Physics and Astronomy
    Meteorology

Division of the Social Sciences

The Division of the Social Sciences aims to provide its students with a coherent interpretation of human behavior. Reliable social scientific knowledge is attained by careful examination, comparison and testing of rational, communicable hypotheses. Comprehension of this process leads to the student’s own discovery of the historical and philosophical development, sociopsychological structure, economic operations, and political organizations of the cultural environment that molds behavior of a socialized individual. The following areas and departments make up this division:

Anthropology
Economics
    Labor Studies
Global Studies and Geography
History
Jewish Studies
Philosophy
    Philosophy of Science
    Philosophy of Law
Political Science
    European Studies
    International Affairs
    Public Affairs
Psychology
Religion
    Jewish Studies
Sociology
Speech-Language-Hearing Sciences

Division of New College for Interdisciplinary Studies

See the “New College for Interdisciplinary Studies” section of this Bulletin.

Additional Areas

African Studies
American Studies
Disability Studies
Irish Studies
Latin American and Caribbean Studies
LEAP (Legal Education Accelerated Program)
LGBT Studies
Liberal Arts
Liberal Arts Colloquia
Middle Eastern and Central Asian Studies
Military Science
Physician Assistant Studies
Women’s Studies

The Hofstra College of Liberal Arts and Sciences offers undergraduate programs leading to the degrees of Bachelor of Arts, Bachelor of Engineering, Bachelor of Fine Arts and Bachelor of Science. Programs in teacher education are offered jointly with the School of Education through dual enrollment.

NOTE: Core Course Information

Students who entered Hofstra prior to fall 2004 must complete all requirements as stipulated in the Bulletin of first registration. Students who entered Hofstra prior to fall 2004 and who must satisfy core requirements may, beginning in fall 2004, fulfill these requirements by taking distribution courses in the corresponding distribution categories.

Distribution Courses

A number of Hofstra University bachelor’s degree programs include distribution requirements among their general degree requirements. The distribution requirements are designed to afford the student some familiarity with the subject matter and intellectual methods used in the various liberal arts and sciences. In addition, these requirements seek to expose students to a broad range of cultural traditions, and encourage students to partake in interdisciplinary studies that draw on the general resources of the liberal arts and sciences. The distribution categories and their identifying codes are listed below.

Courses taken on an optional Pass/D+/D/Fail basis may not be used to satisfy distribution requirements. Note, however, that some distribution courses are given only on a Pass/D+/D/Fail basis and may be used to fulfill distribution requirements.

Transfer credit for distribution requirements is determined on a course equivalency basis.

Distribution Categories

Humanities Division

Literature (LT)

Courses that may be used to satisfy this requirement are designated by “LT” before the course title in this Bulletin and in the Class Schedule published each semester. These courses are offered in the subject areas listed below:

African Studies (AFST)
Asian Studies (ASST)
Comparative Literature and Languages (CLL)
Disability Studies (DSST)
English (ENGL)
French (FREN)
French Literature in Translation (FRLT)
German (GERM)
Greek (GRK)
Hebrew (HEBR)
Hofstra University Honors College (HUHC)
Irish Studies (IRE)
Italian (ITAL)
Italian American Studies (ITST)
Italian Literature in Translation (ITLT)
Latin (LAT)
Literature in Translation (LIT)
New College for Interdisciplinary Studies (NC)
Romance Languages and Literatures in Translation (RLLT)
Russian (RUS)
Spanish (SPAN)
Spanish Literature in Translation (SPLT)

The Arts (AA or CP)

Courses that may be used to satisfy this requirement are designated by either “AA” or “CP” before the course title in this Bulletin and in the class schedule published each semester. These designations signify a difference in the type of course that may be used to satisfy this requirement. Those courses that seek to enhance the student’s appreciation and analysis of a non-literary art form are designated “AA”; those courses that require a student to creatively participate in an art form are designated “CP.” These courses are offered in the subject areas listed below:

African Studies (AFST)
Art History (AH)
Creative Writing (CRWR)
Dance (DNCE)
Drama (DRAM)
Fine Arts (FA)
Italian American Studies (ITST)
Irish Studies (IRE)
Music (MUS)
New College for Interdisciplinary Studies (NC)
Radio, Television, Film (RTVF)
Speech Communication and Rhetorical Studies (SPCM)
Women’s Studies (WST)
Writing Studies and Composition (WSC)

Natural Sciences, Mathematics/Computer Science Division

Natural Sciences (NS)

Courses that may be used to satisfy this requirement are designated by “NS” before the course title in this Bulletin and in the class schedule published each semester. These courses are offered in the subject areas listed below:

Astronomy (ASTR)
Biology (BIO)
Chemistry (CHEM)
Engineering (ENGG)
Geology (GEOL)
Natural Science (NSC)
New College for Interdisciplinary Studies (NC)
Physics (PHYS)
Technology and Public Policy (TPP)

Mathematics/Computer Science (MC)

Courses that may be used to satisfy this requirement are designated by “MC” before the course title in this Bulletin and in the class schedule published each semester. These courses are offered in the subject areas listed below:

Computer Science (CSC)
Mathematics (MATH)
New College for Interdisciplinary Studies (NC)

Social Sciences Division

Behavioral Social Sciences (BH)

Courses that may be used to satisfy this requirement are designated by “BH” before the course title in this Bulletin and in the class schedule published each semester. These courses are offered by the departments listed below:

African Studies (AFST)
Anthropology (ANTH)
Economics (ECO)
Geography (GEOG)
Hofstra University Honors College (HUHC)
Irish Studies (IRE)
Labor Studies (LABR)
New College for Interdisciplinary Studies (NC)
Political Science (PSC)
Psychology (PSY)
Sociology (SOC)
Speech-Language-Hearing Sciences (SPCH)

History, Philosophy, Religion (HP)

Courses that may be used to satisfy this requirement are designated by “HP” before the course title in this Bulletin and in the class schedule published each semester. These courses are offered in the subject areas listed below:

History (HIST)
Hofstra University Honors College (HUHC)
Jewish Studies (JWST)
New College for Interdisciplinary Studies (NC)
Philosophy (PHI)
Religion (RELI)

Cross-Cultural (CC)

Courses that may be used to satisfy this requirement are designated by “CC” before the course title in this Bulletin and in the class schedule published each semester. Currently these courses are offered in the following subject areas.

African Studies (AFST)
Art History (AH)
Anthropology (ANTH)
Asian Studies (ASST)
Economics (ECO)
English (ENGL)
French (FREN)
French Literature in Translation (FRLT)
Geography (GEOG)
History (HIST)
Labor Studies (LABR)
Latin American and Caribbean Studies (LACS)
Linguistics (LING)
Literature in Translation (LIT)
Middle Eastern and Caribbean Studies (MECA)
New College for Interdisciplinary Studies (NC)
Philosophy (PHI)
Political Science (PSC)
Religion (RELI)
Sociology (SOC)
Spanish Literature in Translation (SPLT)
Speech-Language-Hearing Sciences (SPCH)

Interdisciplinary Studies (IS)

Courses that may be used to satisfy this requirement are designated by “IS” before the course title in this Bulletin and in the class schedule published each semester, and are regarded by the College as employing an interdisciplinary approach to their subject matter. Currently courses with the designation “IS” are offered in the following subject areas only.

American Studies (AMST)
Asian Studies (ASST)
Disability Studies (DSST)
European Studies (EUR)
Global Studies (GS)
Irish Studies (IRE)
Italian American Studies (ITST)
Labor Studies (LABR)
Latin American and Caribbean Studies (LACS)
Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual and Transgender Studies (LGBT)
New College for Interdisciplinary Studies (NC)
Religion (RELI)
Women’s Studies (WST)

 

Undergraduate Programs

Bachelor of Arts

The candidate for the B.A. degree pursues studies that have elements both of breadth and of depth. The element of breadth is made up of inquiry that ranges widely over the arts and sciences. Students are encouraged, beyond the fulfillment of minimal requirements, to explore various fields as their developing interests lead them. The element of depth in the B.A. program is mainly to be found in the field of specialization or academic major, chosen by the student from one of the fields listed below, after a year or two of college work. For the major, each academic department defines the special pattern of required and suggested study that suits its discipline.

Academic Majors 

African Studies 
American Studies 
Anthropology 
Anthropology (Archaeology Option) 
Art History 
Asian Studies 
Biology 
Chemistry 
Chinese 
Chinese Studies 
Classics 
Comparative Literature 
Computer Science 
Dance 
Drama 
Early Childhood Education *
Economics 
Elementary Education *
Engineering Science 
English 
Fine Arts 
French 
Geography 
Geology 
German 
Hebrew 
History 
Ibero-American Studies 
Italian 
Jewish Studies 
Labor Studies 
Latin 
Latin American and Caribbean Studies 
Liberal Arts 
Linguistics 
Mathematical Economics 
Mathematics 
Music 
Philosophy 
Physics 
Political Science 
Psychology 
Religion 
Religion With Area Concentration Option 
Russian 
Secondary Education  *
Sociology 
Spanish 
Speech-Language-Hearing Sciences 
Women’s Studies 

* Dual enrollment required

Academic Minors 

In addition to a major, a student may choose a second field of lesser specialization, an academic minor. Minors are generally available in departments and programs that offer majors. In addition, some interdisciplinary programs offer minors alone. Like the major, a completed minor field will be listed on the student’s record. In general, the requirement for the optional minor in the College of Liberal Arts and Sciences is the successful completion of 18 semester hours of courses in the program, with at least six hours in residence. Only courses acceptable for the major may be applied toward the minor. Pass/D+/D/Fail credit will be given toward an academic minor for courses offered only on this basis. For optional minors see the Zarb School of Business, School of Communication; and School of Education, Health and Human Services. Refer to the Pass/D+/D/Fail option in the “Policies” section of this Bulletin and the department of minor specialization for specific requirements.

Major and Preprofessional Advisement

Each academic department has faculty advisers for its student majors and minors. There are also special advisers for students who are interested in professional and preprofessional programs of medicine, dentistry, veterinary medicine, law and education. These specializations usually call for the student to follow a B.A. or B.S. program, using the options within it in appropriate ways. Such is the case, for example, for most students who plan to become secondary or elementary school teachers. Students should consult their preprofessional advisers early in their college work and remain in touch with them thereafter.

Degree Requirements

Candidates for graduation with the degree of Bachelor of Arts must fulfill the following requirements, including:

  1. Semester Hour Requirement
    The successful completion of at least 124 semester hours and a cumulative grade-point average of 2.0 in work completed at Hofstra.
  2. Liberal Arts Requirement
    At least 94 semester hours (93 hours for the B.A. specialization in Early Childhood Education and a liberal arts major, Elementary Education and a liberal arts major, and a Dual Certification Program in Early Childhood Education and Childhood Education and a liberal arts major) of the total must be in liberal arts. Beyond this minimum, the student may elect either nonliberal arts courses or additional liberal arts courses. See Elementary Education in the School of Education, Health and Human Services. 
    All courses in the College of Liberal Arts and Sciences are offered for liberal arts credit unless otherwise noted.
  3. Residency Requirement
    There are two requirements that must ordinarily be completed in residence at Hofstra: 15 semester hours in the major field of concentration, and the last 30 semester hours. The 15 semester hours in the major need not be included in or within the last 30 hours.
  4. Distribution Requirement
    The fulfillment of 33 semester hours of distribution requirements as follows (see Distribution courses in this section). NOTE: No student may use the same course to satisfy two separate distribution requirements, nor may a student use the same course to satisfy the distribution requirement and foreign language requirement.
A.    Nine semester hours of distribution courses in the humanities. The nine semester hours must include at least three from the Literature category and at least three from the Arts category. No more than three semester hours of Creative Participation courses may be used to satisfy this requirement.

B.     Nine semester hours of distribution courses in the natural sciences and mathematics/computer science. At least three semester hours must be chosen from each category.

C.    Nine semester hours of distribution courses in the social sciences. The nine semester hours must include at least three from the Behavioral Sciences category and at least three from the History, Philosophy, Religion category.

D.    Three semester hours of distribution course credit in the cross-cultural category.

E.    Three semester hours of distribution course credit in the Interdisciplinary Studies category. A student may satisfy this requirement with three semester hours of Interdisciplinary Studies course credit or with three additional semester hours taken from A-D, above.

5.     English Composition Requirement
        Satisfactory completion of WSC 1  & WSC 2  and the Hofstra Writing Proficiency Exam.

6.     Foreign Language Requirement
        Completion of level 4 of a foreign language, placement above level 4, or completion of the Special Language Option.

Students continuing a language studied in high school should follow option A below. Students who do not wish to continue the study of a foreign language studied in high school should follow option B below.

International students may satisfy the language requirement either by completing ELP 36  or by placing out of the requirement by taking the placement examination in their native language.
A.    Continuing a Language Studied in High School: For students continuing the same language studied in high school, the successful completion of level 4 of that language will satisfy the foreign language requirement.

Placement for students continuing a language studied in high school:
  • Students without transfer college credit in the foreign language studied in high school must take the language placement test (administered by the Language Laboratory) to determine placement in the proper level. No student shall receive credit toward graduation for any course below his or her level of placement in that language.
  • Students with transfer college credit in the foreign language studied in high school should continue in the next level which follows that in which they have receivedcredit.
For both transfer and non-transfer students continuing the same language studied in high school, the foreign language requirement can only be satisfied by completing level 4.
B.    The Special Language Option: Students who do not wish to continue the study of a foreign language studied in high school may take levels 1 and 2 of a foreign language not previously studied and six semester hours chosen from the following:
levels 3 and/or 4 of that language
levels 1 and/or 2 of any other foreign language not previously studied;
literature in translation;
comparative literature;
linguistics
Students who wish to use option B should file the Special Language Option Form with the Advisement Office. If the student’s high school transcript is not on file, the student must supply one in order to complete the process. NOTE: The Pass/D+/D/Fail Option is not available for courses taken in fulfillment of any language requirement.

7.    Major Requirement

The fulfillment of major requirements as listed in the Bulletin under the department of specialization. A student may not count more than 45 semester hours within a single major discipline toward the 124 credits for the B.A. without special permission from the appropriate academic dean, except that this limit shall be 48 semester hours for those students qualifying and electing to undertake departmental honors courses. Where the major department requires more than 124 semester hours for the degree, the excess over 124 may include required work in the department additional to this 45/48 hour maximum.

B.A. Distribution Requirements
A total of 33 semester hours

Humanities                            9
    Literature (LT)                   3
    The Arts:
        Appreciation & Analysis (AA)
                or                   3
        Creative Participation (CP)
      LT or AA                       3


* Only three of the nine credits in the Humanities may be satisfied with Creative Participation courses.

Natural Sciences, Mathematics/
Computer Science                       9

    Natural Sciences (NS)              3
    Mathematics/Computer Science (MC)  3
    NS or MC                         3

Social Sciences                        9
    Behavioral Social Sciences (BH)    3
    History, Philosophy, Religion (HP) 3
    BH or HP                           3

Cross Cultural (CC)                    3
Interdisciplinary Studies/Other* (IS)  3


*     This requirement may be satisfied by three credits of  Interdisciplinary Studies or by three credits in any  of the above categories, including a Creative Participation Course.

Note: Students who may select a co-major in teacher education will find specific New York State Education Department liberal arts requirements within the School of Education, Health and Human Services sections of this Bulletin. Please consult the specific education program requirements before planning the HCLAS Distribution course work.

Transfer Credit

Students who receive transfer credit for courses equivalent to those that satisfy distribution requirements may apply these courses to fulfill some or all of their distribution requirements. No student may satisfy distribution requirements at another institution once that student has matriculated at Hofstra University with the exception of students participating in an accredited study abroad program at another institution; with permission of the department offering the distribution course, such students may receive credit for one, and only one, distribution course upon successful completion of the course and the study abroad program. In acknowledgement of the experiential component of study abroad courses, it is recognized that distribution courses taken while participating in study abroad programs may not be exact equivalents to Hofstra courses that satisfy distribution requirements. A waiver and substitution form signed by the chairperson of the department offering the distribution course and the dean of the unit of the student’s major is required.

Bachelor of Engineering

The Hofstra College of Liberal Arts and Sciences offers a day and evening program leading to the degree of Bachelor of Engineering with a specialization in Engineering Science **. An important objective of this curriculum is to provide a broad and liberating education as well as depth and competence in the engineering field.

(** Specializations in biomedical, civil, and environmental.)

Degree Requirements

Candidates for graduation with the B.E. degree must fulfill the following requirements:

  1. The successful completion of the required semester hours for the major and a cumulative grade-point average of 2.0 in work completed at Hofstra.
  2. The liberal arts requirement for the specialization.
  3. There are two requirements that must ordinarily be completed in residence at Hofstra. See specific program for these requirements.
  4. The fulfillment of the following general requirements for the B.E.
    1. Satisfactory completion of WSC 1  and 2  (see University Degree Requirements)
    2. Humanities, as stipulated under specialization
    3. Social Sciences, as stipulated under specialization
  5. The major and additional requirements as listed under the field of study.

Bachelor of Fine Arts

The Hofstra College of Liberal Arts and Sciences offers the degree of Bachelor of Fine Arts in Theater Arts.

Degree Requirements

 Candidates for graduation with the B.F.A. degree in Theater Arts  must fulfill the following requirements:

  1. The successful completion of at least 132 semester hours and a cumulative grade point average of 2.5 in work completed at Hofstra.
  2. At least 62 semester hours of the total must be in liberal arts.
  3. Candidates must spend the last six semesters of full-time study in residence at Hofstra.
  4. Satisfactory completion of WSC 1  and 2  and the Hofstra Writing Proficiency Exam.
  5. Completion of at least 6 semester hours of the same foreign language.
  6. The fulfillment of 24 semester hours of distribution requirements as follows (see Distribution courses in this section).  NOTE:  No student may use the same course to satisfy two separate distribution requirements.
    A.      Nine semester hours of distribution courses in the humanities.  The nine semester hours must include at least three from the literature (LT) category and at least three from the appreciation and analysis (AA) category.  Three semester hours may then be chosen from either literature (LT), appreciation and analysis (AA), or creative participation (CP).
    B.      Three semester hours in the natural sciences (NS).
    C.      Three semester hours in mathematics/computer science (MC).
    D.      Three semester hours in the behavioral social sciences (BH).
    E.      Three semester hours in the history, philosophy, religion category (HP).
    F.      Three semester hours in the cross cultural category (CC).
  7. Demonstration of proficiency satisfactory to the drama faculty as determined by the following: annual screening of majors, a senior project and a comprehensive examination.
  8. The major requirements as listed under the Department of Drama and Dance. 

Bachelor of Science

The Hofstra College of Liberal Arts and Sciences offers programs leading to the degree of Bachelor of Science in the fields of specialization listed below. The objective of these curricula is to provide a broad and liberating education as well as depth and competence in a given area of knowledge. Thus, liberal arts courses are required in each program.

Applied Physics 
Biochemistry     
Biology    
Business Economics     
Chemistry     
Computer Engineering     
Computer Science     
Computer Science and Mathematics     
Electrical Engineering     
Environmental Resources     
Fine Arts 
Forensic Science 
Geology 
Industrial Engineering 
Mathematical Business Economics 
Mathematics 
Mechanical Engineering 
Music 
Physician Assistant Studies 
Physics 

A student seeking a B.S. degree may earn a minor under the same guidelines as for the B.A. degree. Refer to the department of minor specialization for specific requirements.

Degree Requirements

Candidates for graduation with the degree of Bachelor of Science must fulfill the following requirements (see specific program for details):

  1. The successful completion of the required semester hours for the major and a cumulative grade point average of 2.0 in work completed at Hofstra.
  2. The liberal arts requirement for the specialization.
  3. There are certain requirements that must ordinarily be completed in residence at Hofstra. See specific program for these requirements.
  4. The fulfillment of the following general requirements for the B.S.
  5. Satisfactory completion of WSC 1  and 2  (See University Degree Requirements)
  6. Humanities (at least 6 s.h.)
  7. Natural Sciences/Mathematics (at least 6 s.h.)
  8. Social Sciences (at least 6 s.h.) Some programs require the completion of distribution courses offered in the Hofstra College of Liberal Arts and Sciences. Refer to specific program for details.
  9. The major and additional requirements as listed under the field of study.

See also: Hofstra College of Liberal Arts and Sciences General Education Goals and Learning Objectives for the Bachelor of Science Degree in this section.

Hofstra College of Liberal Arts and Sciences General Education Goals and Learning Objectives

General Education Goals and Learning Objectives for the Bachelor of Arts and Bachelor of Fine Arts Degrees

Goals

  1. Students will demonstrate the ability to think critically and creatively.
    Learning Objectives:
    a.    Clearly and accurately summarize and evaluate the facts, presumptions, viewpoints, values, and arguments presented in a text or creative work.
    b.    Gather and assess relevant information, and apply appropriate cognitive methods in solving problems or answering questions raised in a text or creative work.
    c.    Construct well-reasoned solutions or conclusions; test and defend conclusions against relevant criteria and standards.
    d.    Critically analyze one’s own thinking by identifying one’s presumptions, values, and viewpoints as well as problems, inconsistencies, and unanswered questions.
    e.    Conceive and defend alternative hypotheses and viewpoints; offer and explain reasons for provisionally rejecting or accepting them.
  2. Students will apply analytical reasoning across academic disciplines.
    Learning Objectives:
    a.    Read with comprehension, and critically interpret written work in discipline-specific contexts.
    b.    Critically interpret and analyze aesthetic qualities of works in literature and the fine or performing arts.
    c.    Apply quantitative, inductive, and deductive reasoning.
    d.    Apply abstract thinking and conceptual modeling.
    e.    Apply scientific methods to investigate and analyze the natural world.
    f.    Apply the methods of social science to ethically investigate and analyze human social behavior.
    g.    Describe, comprehend, and analyze the role of philosophical ideas, historical movements, or ethical debates in the development of civilizations.
  3. Students will demonstrate proficiency in written communication.
    Learning Objectives:
    a.    Compose grammatical sentences.
    b.    Use various sentence forms to effectively modulate style and tone.
    c.    Compose a sequence of paragraphs that develop a point.
    d.    Summarize, quote, and respond to reliable texts to support and develop claims; apply relevant standards for citation.
    e.    Write an effective argumentative essay.
    f.    Respond to writing assignments using appropriate style, structure, and voice.
    g.    Apply editing, proofreading, and revising strategies.
  4. Students will demonstrate proficiency in oral communication.
    Learning Objectives:
    a.    Demonstrate skill in oral communication for purposes such as informing, persuading, and/or defending.
    b.    Compose and deliver effective, audience-appropriate oral presentations that develop and support a point; or participate in formal debates; or lead or participate in collaborative discussion of a question or a text.
    c.    When appropriate, use visual, auditory, and/or technological aids.
  5. Students will develop an awareness of and sensitivity to global issues.
    Learning Objectives:
    a.    Provide and understand information on simple concrete subjects in a language other than English in both oral and written form.*
    b.    Demonstrate knowledge of the intellectual, social, political, economic, or cultural practices of at least one of the peoples in Africa, Asia, the Middle East, Latin America, or of the indigenous peoples of the Americas and Australia.
  6. Students will demonstrate information literacy.
    Learning Objectives:
    a.    Conduct research using the variety of information sources available to them.
    b.    Demonstrate the ability to evaluate the relevance and utility of different sources.
    c.    Integrate sources effectively and ethically through proper citation.
  7. Students will demonstrate technological competency.
    Learning Objective:
    Demonstrate the ability to use general or discipline-specific technologies to identify, retrieve, analyze, and communicate ideas and information.

General Education Goals and Learning Objectives for the Bachelor of Science and Bachelor of Engineering Degrees

Goals

  1. Students will demonstrate the ability to think critically and creatively.
    Learning Objectives:
    a.    Clearly and accurately summarize and evaluate the facts, presumptions, viewpoints, values, and arguments presented in a text or creative work.
    b.    Gather and assess relevant information, and apply appropriate cognitive methods in solving problems or answering questions raised in a text or creative work.
    c.    Construct well-reasoned solutions or conclusions; test and defend conclusions against relevant criteria and standards.
    d.    Critically analyze one’s own thinking by identifying one’s presumptions, values, and viewpoints as well as problems, inconsistencies, and unanswered questions.
    e.    Conceive and defend alternative hypotheses and viewpoints; offer and explain reasons for provisionally rejecting or accepting them.
  2. Students will apply analytical reasoning across academic disciplines.
    Learning Objectives:
    a.    Read with comprehension, and critically interpret written work in discipline-specific contexts.
    b.    Critically interpret and analyze aesthetic qualities of works in literature and/or the fine or performing arts.
    c.    Apply quantitative, inductive, and deductive reasoning.
    d.    Apply abstract thinking and conceptual modeling.
    e.    Apply scientific methods to investigate and analyze the natural world.
    f.    Apply the methods of social science to ethically investigate and analyze human social behavior and/or describe, comprehend, and analyze the role of philosophical ideas, historical movements, or ethical debates in the development of civilizations.
  3. Students will demonstrate proficiency in written communication.
    Learning Objectives:
    a.    Compose grammatical sentences.
    b.    Use various sentence forms to effectively modulate style and tone.
    c.    Compose a sequence of paragraphs that develop a point.
    d.    Summarize, quote, and respond to reliable texts to support and develop claims; apply relevant standards for citation.
    e.    Write an effective argumentative essay.
    f.    Respond to writing assignments using appropriate style, structure, and voice.
    g.    Apply editing, proofreading, and revising strategies.
  4. Students will demonstrate proficiency in oral communication.
    Learning Objectives:
    a.    Demonstrate skill in oral communication for purposes such as informing, persuading, and/or defending.
    b.    Compose and deliver effective, audience-appropriate oral presentations that develop and support a point; or participate in formal debates; or lead or participate in collaborative discussion of a question or a text.
    c.    When appropriate, use visual, auditory, and/or technological aids.
  5. Students will demonstrate information literacy.
    Learning Objectives:
    a.    Conduct research using the variety of information sources available to them.
    b.    Demonstrate the ability to evaluate the relevance and utility of different sources.
    c.    Integrate sources effectively and ethically through proper citation.
  6. Students will demonstrate technological competency.
    Learning Objectives:
    Demonstrate the ability to use general or discipline-specific technologies to identify, retrieve, analyze, and communicate ideas and information.

International Education

Hofstra College of Liberal Arts and Sciences regularly offers opportunities to study abroad. Each summer, Hofstra faculty conduct language and literature/culture programs in Czechoslovakia, Ecuador/Galápagos, France, Greece, Ireland, Italy, Japan, Mexico and Spain. In addition, a theater program is offered in London during the January session. For further information, please refer to Study Abroad.

Off-Campus Education

New College offers opportunities for students in the Hofstra College of Liberal Arts and Sciences to earn academic credit for domestic and international off-campus internships and for approved study-abroad programs. Information is available in New College from the program director for Domestic Off-Campus Education and the program director for International Off-Campus Education. (See “Domestic Off-Campus Education” and “International Off-Campus Education” in the New College section of this Bulletin.)

Academic Chairs and Distinguished Professorships

The John Cranford Adams Chair in the Humanities is held by Dr. Phillip Lopate, Professor of English.

The Donald E. Axinn Distinguished Professorship in Ecology and Conservation at Hofstra.

The Sardarni Kuljit Kaur Bindra Endowed Chair in Sikh Studies is held by Dr. Arvind-pal Singh Mandair, Assistant Professor of Religion.

The Leo A. Guthart Distinguished Professorship in Teaching Excellence is held by Dr. Liora Pedhazur Schmelkin, Professor of Psychology.

The Msgr. Thomas J. Hartman Endowed Chair in Catholic Studies,  is held by Dr. Julie Byrne, Associate Professor of Religion.

The Peter S. Kalikow Chair in Presidential Studies is held by Dr. Meena Bose, Professor.

The Jean Nerkin Distinguished Professorship in Engineering is held by Dr. Sina Y. Rabbany, Professor.

The Harry H. Wachtel Distinguished Teaching Professorship for the Study of Nonviolent Social Change is held by Professor D’Innocenzo, Professor of History.

The Augustus B. Weller Chair in Economics is currently vacant.

 

 

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