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    Hofstra University
   
 
  Nov 22, 2017
 
 
    
2007-2008 Graduate Studies Bulletin [ARCHIVED BULLETIN]

Psychology, Psy.D. in School-Community


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Robert Motta, Graduate Program Director, (516) 463-5029,  Robert.W.Motta@hofstra.edu

This program prepares students to become psychology practitioners who provide services to schools and community health service settings. Emphasis is placed upon training the psychologist as a consultant who brings about change within school and community settings, and who is also a provider of psychological services for individuals and families. The practice of school-community psychology is viewed as involving assessment, intervention, planning and prevention in public schools, special education facilities, geriatric facilities, veterans centers, centers for the homeless, police departments, facilities for the disabled, facilities for the drug addicted, etc.

The program is designed to accommodate beginning-level students who enter with a bachelor’s degree, and advanced-level students who enter with the master’s degree in psychology. Students who are accepted directly upon completion of the bachelor’s degree will attend a full-time, 94-credit program. Advanced students who have already completed a master’s degree in psychology may attend full- or part-time. Course and credit requirements for advanced students will be determined on an individual basis, following review of official graduate transcripts.

All students are required to complete a one-year internship and practicum experiences as part of their training. A wide range of school and community settings are available for student training. In addition, completion of a doctoral dissertation in an area within the broad field of school-community  psychology, is also required. The program faculty have varied areas of special expertise and are able to provide specific training in childhood and adult behavior disorders, posttraumatic stress disorders, alcoholism, forensic (police) psychology, homelessness, education and issues related to gifted and talented children, immigration and cultural adaptation, etc.

Applications completed by January 15 will be screened for regular acceptance. Applications completed after April 1 will be considered only if there are openings in the program. Information about the program and application material can be obtained from the Graduate Admissions Office. Students are accepted only for the fall semester of each year.

Admission Requirements


Beginning Level


Students admitted with a bachelor’s degree will be required to meet the following admission criteria:

  1. Successful completion of the baccalaureate degree from an accredited institution. 
  2. Scores on the Verbal Section of the GRE of no less than 500 and on the Quantitative Section of no less than 500. 
  3. Score on the GRE, Psychology Section, of no less than the 65th percentile.
  4. A cumulative grade point average of 3.0 or better in the following psychology courses which were completed prior to admission:
    • Human Development
    • Elementary Statistics
    • Experimental Design
    The courses below are recommended, not required.
    • History and Systems of Psychology
    • Physiological Psychology
    • Psychometric Theory
  5. Three letters of recommendation. 
  6. A personal statement. 
  7. A personal interview.

Advanced Level


Students admitted at the advanced level, who already possess a master’s degree in psychology, will be required to meet the following admission criteria:

  1. Successful completion of a master’s degree in psychology from an accredited institution.
  2. Scores on the Verbal Section of the GRE of no less than 500 and on the Quantitative Section of no less than 500. 
  3. Score on the GRE, Psychology Section, of no less than the 65th percentile.
  4. Three letters of recommendation. 
  5. A personal statement. 
  6. A personal interview.

Program Requirements - Total Semester Hours: 94


Required Courses


The following courses are required unless transfer credit is obtained. For students who enter at the advanced level, transfer credit is determined on an individual basis.

Electives


Students are permitted to take six semester hours of electives chosen from the following, under advisement of the Program Director.

Graduation Requirements


  1. Completion of the 94-credit program with a cumulative grade point average of B or better. Advanced students will be given transfer credit based on an individual analysis of their prior graduate academic record.
  2. Successful completion of a qualifying examination which must be taken and passed following the first year in the program. This examination is given in May of each year. Students who fail the qualifying examination twice will be dropped from the program.
  3. Students must maintain a B average each semester, receive no more than one C per semester and no more than three C’s in total toward the Psy.D. or the student will be dropped from the program. 
  4. If a student earns a grade of D in a course, the instructor of that course will inform the Program Director who will then convene a meeting of the Core Program Faculty to discuss the circumstances under which the D was earned. If this is the first D earned during his or her course of study, the student will be immediately placed on probation and a remedial plan for the student will be developed by the faculty. In the case of a D, course credit will not count toward the degree being sought but the grade is included in determining the cumulative grade-point average. The course or its equivalent, must be repeated. A second grade of D received in any course while enrolled in the program is grounds for immediate dismissal. The Core Program Faculty will decide if the dismissal is warranted. A letter which reviews the discussion and outcome of the meeting will be generated by the Program Director with a copy sent to the student. 
  5. A grade of F in any class is grounds for immediate dismissal from the program. If a student earns an F, the instructor of that course will inform the Program Director who will then convene a meeting of the Core Program Faculty to discuss the circumstances under which the F has been earned. A letter which reviews the deliberations of the Core Program Faculty will be generated by the Program Director with a copy sent to the student.
  6. Students are expected to behave in an ethical and professional manner according to the guidelines for student conduct and academic honesty at Hofstra University, and the Ethical Standards for Psychologists published by the American Psychological Association. Satisfactory interpersonal behavior and professional performance in classes and meetings, on practica and internships, etc. is expected. If a report of an ethics violation or an interpersonal problem which may be impeding professional growth is received, the Program Director will convene a meeting of the Core Program Faculty to discuss the circumstances under which the violation or problem arose. After a faculty investigation, a report will be issued that may clear the student of any wrongdoing, place the student on probation with a plan for remediation or dismiss the student from the program. A letter, which reviews the deliberations of the Core Program Faculty, will be generated by the Program Director with a copy sent to the student.
  7. Successful completion of an approved doctoral dissertation project.
  8. Satisfactory performance at an oral defense of the doctoral dissertation project.

Footnotes


*A student who has not made sufficient progress on the dissertation to gain permission of the members of the committee to begin collecting data, will have to repeat the course, paying full fee. A student must maintain continuous enrollment in this course, registering for it during the fall and spring semesters. A student must complete the work for this course within two semesters. If sufficient progress has not been made by the end of this period, the student will have to enroll in 603A, Extended Dissertation Advisement. This course may be taken only once. If the student does not complete the work for this course by the end of the semester, the student will be dropped from the program.

**A student who does not complete the dissertation during the semester of enrollment in 604, Dissertation Advisement, will have to repeat the course, paying full fee. Once 602, Dissertation Proposal Preparation or 603A, Extended Dissertation Advisement has been completed, a student must enroll in 604, Dissertation Advisement, the following semester and maintain continuous enrollment in this course during the fall and spring semesters. A student must complete the work for this course within three semesters. If the dissertation is not completed by the end of this period, the student must immediately enroll in 605A, Dissertation Extension. The student will be dropped from the program if all requirements for the dissertation are not fulfilled by the end of 605A. Once a candidate has begun work on the dissertation, a leave of absence from the program will not be granted, except in highly unusual circumstances.

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