Skip to Navigation
    Hofstra University
   
 
  Sep 23, 2017
 
 
    
2010-2011 Graduate Studies Bulletin [ARCHIVED BULLETIN]

Learning and Teaching, Doctoral Program (Ed.D.) in


Return to Program Information Return to: Program Information

Associate Professor Torff, Graduate Program Director, (516) 463-5803

Leading to the degree of Doctor of Education (Ed.D.), the Doctoral Program in Learning and Teaching prepares students to work as educational researchers, curriculum developers, teacher educators, and mentor teachers in schools and other educational settings. Students will generate, apply, and disseminate theory, research, and instructional materials to inform curriculum development and teacher education. The program enables students to acquire broad and deep knowledge of studies of learning and teaching, gain research skills with quantitative and qualitative methods, and complete a specialized program of studies in their area of expertise. The program also enables students to design and implement dissertation projects that contribute to the knowledge base in studies of learning and teaching and have practical applications for schools and other educational settings. 

Application for Admission


Apply before March 1 for admission in the subsequent fall semester. Applications completed after March 1 will be considered late and will be reviewed only if there are openings. Application materials may be obtained from the Office of Graduate Admissions: (516) 463-4876; gradstudent@hofstra.edu.

Admission Requirements


  1. A completed application form.
  2. Official transcripts of all graduate and undergraduate course work.  Applicants must hold master’s and bachelor’s degrees from accredited institutions.  Either the bachelor’s or master’s degree must closely relate to the doctoral specialization sought by the applicant.  A minimum grade-point average (GPA) of 3.5 in graduate course work and 3.0 in undergraduate course work is required.
  3. An official report of scores on the Graduate Record Examination (GRE), with a minimum combined score of 1000 on the verbal and quantitative sections and a minimum score of 5 on the analytical writing section.
  4. A typed statement of intent and rationale for pursuing doctoral studies (500-1000 words).
  5. Three professional references from individuals who can attest to the applicant’s potential for doctoral studies.
  6. A minimum of two years of successful full-time teaching experience or the equivalent.
  7. Evidence of past professional work (e.g., videotape, portfolio, or other relevant documentation).
  8. Interview and on-site writing task (scheduled after all other admissions materials have been received).


Program admissions reflect the belief that no single criterion reliably predicts applicants’ potential for success in the program.  Prospective applicants are encouraged to apply if they do not meet one or more criteria but believe that other aspects of their experience might compensate.  However, since many factors are considered in the selection process, meeting application criteria does not ensure admission to the program.

Graduation Requirements


  1. Completion of the required 60 semester hours with a minimum cumulative GPA of 3.5.  
  2. Satisfaction of residency requirements for doctoral studies at Hofstra University.
  3. Successful completion of a Qualifying Examination.
  4. Completion of a satisfactory Qualifying Paper Proposal and Qualifying Paper.
  5. Completion of a satisfactory dissertation proposal and dissertation.
  6. Satisfactory performance in an Oral Examination administered following completion of the dissertation.
  7. Students must maintain a minimum GPA of 3.5 each semester, receive no more than one course grade of C or lower per semester, and receive no more than three C’s or lower in the Ed.D. program.  Students who fail to meet any of these requirements will be dismissed from the program.
  8. If a student earns a grade of C-, D+, or D in a course, the instructor of the course will inform the Program Director, who will convene a meeting with the student’s adviser to discuss the circumstances under which the grade was earned.  If this is the first C-, D+, or D earned during the student’s course of study, the student will be placed on probation and the Adviser will develop a remedial plan for the student.  In such a case, course credit will not count toward the degree but the grade will be included in the student’s GPA, and the course or its equivalent must be repeated. A second grade of C-, D+, or D received in any course while enrolled in the program is grounds for dismissal.
  9. A grade of F in any course is grounds for dismissal from the program.
  10. Students are expected to behave in an ethical and professional manner according to the guidelines for student conduct and academic honesty at Hofstra University and the School of Education, Health and Human Services. Satisfactory interpersonal behavior and professional performance at all times is expected. If a report is received concerning an ethics violation or an incident of inappropriate behavior as defined by the Judicial Code, established University procedures will be followed to investigate the issue and determine the course of action.

Advisement and Plan of Studies


Upon entering the program, the student is assigned an adviser, a full-time faculty member with expertise in the student’s area of specialization. Assignments are made by agreement of the student, faculty member, and Program Director. Students may change Advisers upon approval of the new adviser and the Program Director.

The adviser will assist the student in completing the Doctoral Plan of Studies, a document indicating how and when the student will complete program requirements. The Doctoral Plan of Studies also indicates how the student will fulfill the program’s residency requirements, which mandate that students enroll for at least 6 s.h. of course work in each of the first three semesters of the program and participate in colloquia and special events offered by the Department of Teaching, Literacy, and Leadership.  

A total of 12 s.h. in related course work will be considered for transfer credit, subject to approval by the student’s adviser and the Program Director. Credits previously applied to an academic degree are typically not approved for transfer credit. Should a student have previously completed course work that the adviser and Program Director deem similar to course work required in the doctoral program, the student will be permitted to substitute alternative courses (with approval of the adviser and Program Director).

Program Requirements


The doctoral program is comprised of two phases: the qualifying phase and the candidacy phase.

Phase I - Qualifying


Learning and Teaching Component - Semester Hours: 18 (including elective in FLPS, below.)


Research Methods Component - Semester Hours: 12-15 (including electives in Research Methods, below.)


Electives in Research Methods (with advisement) - Semester Hours: 3-6


Internship Component - Semester Hours: 3


Specialization Component - Semester Hours: 15-18


Course work, with advisement, in one of the following areas of specialization within either Interdisciplinary Studies or Single-Subject Studies.

I. Interdisciplinary Studies

Arts and Humanities


     Required - Semester Hours: 6

  • CT 276  - Educating for Civic Engagement Semester Hours: 3
  • ELED 233  - Curriculum and Instruction in Creative Arts Semester Hours: 3

     Electives - Semester Hours: 9-12

Early Childhood Education


    Required - Semester Hours: 9

  • CT 371  - Current Trends in Early Childhood Curriculum Development Semester Hours: 3
  • CT 372  - Model Building and Curriculum Development in Early Childhood Education Semester Hours: 3
  • CT 373  - Advanced Curriculum Development in Early Childhood Settings Semester Hours: 3

     Electives - Semester Hours: 6-12

 

Human Development and Educational Psychology


    Required - Semester Hours: 9 

  • CT 219  - Cognition and Instruction Semester Hours: 3
  • CT 266  - Immigrant Children in the U.S. School Semester Hours: 3
  • SED 253  - Teaching for Thinking Semester Hours: 3

    Electives - Semester Hours: 6-9

Integrated Instruction in Mathematics, Science, and Technology


Required - Semester Hours: 15

  • CT 210A  - Emerging Technologies for Teaching and Learning Semester Hours: 3
  • ELED 231  - Curriculum and Instruction in Science Semester Hours: 3
  • ELED 232  - Curriculum and Instruction in Mathematics Semester Hours: 3
  • ELED 235  - Intersections of Mathematics, Science, and Technology Semester Hours: 3
  • ELED 239  - Technology Education in Elementary School Semester Hours: 3

Electives - Semester Hours: 0-3

Multicultural/Urban Education


Required - Semester Hours: 6

  • CT 320  - Locating Ourselves in the Transformative Curriculum in Urban and Multicultural Communities, 3 s.h.
  • CT 321  - Analysis and Developmentof Curriculum for Urban and Multicultural  Communities, 3 s.h.

Electives - Semester Hours: 9-12

Special Education


    Required - Semester Hours: 6

  • SPED 270  - Professional Issues and Problems Semester Hours: 3
    or
  • SPED 310  - Issues in Infant, Toddler, Preschool, Parent and Family Involvement Programs Semester Hours: 3
  • SPED 300  - Special Topics: Advanced Seminar in Special Education Semester Hours: 3

     Choice of one of two strands (with advisement) - Semester Hours: 9-12

        Special Education Leadership

  • SPED 200  - Administration and Supervision of Special Education Semester Hours: 3
  • SPED 272  - Advanced Psychoeducational Assessment in Special Education: Clinical and Classroom Application Semester Hours: 4
  • SPED 273  - Curriculum Development and Evaluation Semester Hours: 3
  • SPED 313  - Technology for Populations With Special Needs Semester Hours: 3

        Disabilty Studies

II. Single-Subject Studies


Applied Linguistics (languages other than English and TESOL/Bilingual)


    Electives - Semester Hours: 15-18

Art Education


    Required - Semester Hours: 3 

  • CT 271  - Current Issues in Art Education and Curriculum Design Semester Hours: 3

    Electives - Semester Hours: 12-15

English Education


    Required - Semester Hours: 9

  • CT 272  - Technology and the Teaching of Writing Semester Hours: 3
  • SED 240  - Current Trends in Secondary Education Semester Hours: 3
  • SED 270  - Current Issues and Trends in English Education Semester Hours: 3

    Electives - Semester Hours: 6-9

 

Mathematics Education


   Required - Semester Hours: 3

  • CT 390  - Theories of Learning Mathematics Semester Hours: 3


    Electives - Semester Hours: 12-15

Physical Education


   Required - Semester Hours: 9

  • MSPE 210 - Pedagogical Trends and Issues in Physical Education and Sport Semester Hours: 3
  • MSPE 212 - Scientific Trends and Issues in Physical Education and Sport Semester Hours: 3
  • MSPE 300 - Departmental Seminar Semester Hours: 3

  Electives (with advisement) - Semester Hours: 9
   
    Choice of one of three strands:

        Physical Education Leadership

  • MSPE 214 - Contemporary Curriculum Perspectives in Physical Education Semester Hours: 3
  • MSPE 217 - Research Implications on Curricula Trends in Physical Fitness Semester Hours: 3
  • MSPE 218 - Sport and the Law Semester Hours: 3
  • MSPE 219 - Comparative Studies in Physical Education and Sport Semester Hours: 3
  • MSPE 224 - Implementing Motor Learning Theories Semester Hours: 3
  • MSPE 225 - Analysis of Movement Semester Hours: 3
  • MSPE 226 - Character Development and Sport Semester Hours: 3
  • MSPE 237 A-Z - Special Topics in Physical Education and Sport Semester Hours: 1-3 

        Adventure Education

  • MSPE 237 A-Z - Special Topics in Physical Education and Sport Semester Hours: 1-3
  • MSPE 241 - Theoretical Foundations of Adventure Education Semester Hours: 3
  • MSPE 243 - Adventure Education Technical Skills Development Semester Hours: 3
  • MSPE 245 - Facilitating and Processing in Adventure Education Semester Hours: 3
  • MSPE 254 - Introduction to Adventure Education and Social Development Challenges Semester Hours:

        Strength and Conditioning

Science Education


    Required - Semester Hours: 6

  • CT 391  - Assessment and Evaluation in Science Semester Hours: 3
  • CT 392  - Curriculum and Instruction in Science in Middle Level and High School Education Semester Hours: 3

    Electives - Semester Hours: 9-12

 

Social Studies Education


    Required - Semester Hours: 15

  • ISI 201 - Cultural Diversity and Global Perspectives Semester Hours: 3
  • ISI 202 - Race and Class in the United States Semester Hours: 3
  • SED 236  - Curriculum and Instruction in Social Studies Semester Hours: 3
  • SED 242  - Global History in the Curriculum Semester Hours: 3
  • SED 276  - Teaching United States History—A Projects Approach Semester Hours: 3

   Elective - Semester Hours: 0-3

Note:


Course work in the Research Methods Component (12-15 s.h.) and Specialization Component (15-18 s.h.) must total 30 s.h.  The student’s adviser or the Program Director may require additional specialization course work as needed. 

Qualifying Procedures


Phase 1 also requires students to satisfactorily complete qualifying procedures including a Qualifying Examination, a Qualifying Paper Proposal (1,000-1,500 words), and a Qualifying Paper (7,500-10,000 words). Prior to undertaking these qualifying procedures, students must complete a minimum of 30 s.h. of course work including: CT 360, 361, 362, 363, 400; RES 260 and 263; and 9 s.h. of course work in the Specialization Component. 

The Qualifying Component begins when the student appoints a three-member Doctoral Committee comprised of the student’s adviser and two other individuals (subject to approval of the adviser and Program Director). Full-time faculty in the School of Education, Health and Human Services are eligible to serve on Doctoral Committees; other members may be appointed with the approval of the adviser and Program Director.

The Qualifying Examination includes questions relating to the courses in the Learning and Teaching Component, Research Methods Component, and Specialization Component. It is given annually in December and May. Approval of all three members of the Doctoral Committee is required for the student to pass the Qualifying Examination. Students who fail the Qualifying Examination may take it again, but they must pass on the second attempt to remain matriculated in the program. 

Procedures for completion of the requirements for the Qualifying Paper Proposal and Qualifying Paper are as follows:

  1. The student submits a Qualifying Paper Proposal to the adviser. 
  2. With the adviser’s consent, the student submits the Qualifying Paper Proposal to the full Doctoral Committee.
  3. Upon approval of the Qualifying Paper Proposal by all members of the Doctoral Committee, the student is eligible to begin work on the Qualifying Paper.
  4. The student submits the Qualifying Paper to the adviser.
  5. With the adviser’s consent, the student submits the Qualifying Paper to the full Doctoral Committee.
  6. Completion of the Qualifying Paper requires the approval of all members of the Doctoral Committee.

To remain matriculated in the program, students must complete a satisfactory Qualifying Paper within one year following completion of the Qualifying Examination.  The adviser may require students to enroll in CT 351 and 352 to complete the Qualifying Paper Proposal and/or Qualifying Paper.

Phase II - Candidacy - Semester Hours: 60


  • CT 601 - Dissertation Seminar, 3 s.h.            
  • CT 602 † - Dissertation Proposal Preparation, 3 s.h.         
  • CT 603 †† - Extended Dissertation Advisement (if necessary), 3 s.h.         
  • CT 604 ††† - Dissertation Advisement, 3 s.h.          
  • CT 605 †††† - Dissertation Extension (if necessary), 3 s.h.  

† - Students may enroll in this course for a total of two semesters, pending completion of a satisfactory Dissertation Proposal; three credits will be applied toward the degree when the Dissertation Proposal has been approved.
†† - For students who have not completed a satisfactory Dissertation Proposal in CT 602; no credit will be applied toward the degree.
††† - Students may enroll in this course for a total of three semesters depending completion of a satisfactory dissertation; three credits will be applied toward the degree when the dissertation has been approved.
†††† - For students who have not completed a satisfactory Dissertation in CT 604; no credit will be applied toward the degree.

Dissertation Proposal


Prior to enrollment in CT 601 Dissertation Seminar at the outset of the Phase II, students must complete all Qualifying Procedures and 48 s.h. of course work including CT 500 and all courses in the Learning and Teaching Component. In CT 601, four-person Doctoral Student Committees will be established to provide support for students as they develop their dissertation projects. Following successful completion of CT 601, students enroll in CT 602 and begin work on the Dissertation Proposals (5000-10,000 words). Students may enroll in CT 602 a maximum of two times. Students who do not complete a satisfactory Dissertation Proposal in CT 602 must enroll in CT 603. Students must complete a satisfactory Dissertation Proposal by the end of CT 603 to remain matriculated in the program. If a student must interrupt work toward the degree, he/she may request a waiver but must maintain matriculation (see University Regulations).

Procedures for approval of a Dissertation Proposal are as follows:

  1. The student submits the Dissertation Proposal to the adviser.
  2. With the adviser’s consent, the student submits the Dissertation Proposal to the full Doctoral Committee. The student and Doctoral Committee may arrange a meeting to facilitate the development of the Dissertation Proposal.
  3. Upon approval of the Dissertation Proposal by all members of the Dissertation Committee (and Hofstra’s Institutional Review Board), the student is eligible to enroll in CT 604 and begin work on the Dissertation.     

Dissertation and Oral Examination


As students complete the Dissertation work, they enroll in CT 604 a maximum of three times.  Students who do not satisfactorily complete a Dissertation and Oral Examination in CT 604 must enroll in CT 605.  Students who are unable to satisfactorily complete a Dissertation and Oral Examination by the end of CT 605 will be dismissed from the program.  If a student must interrupt work towards the degree, he/she must request a waiver but must maintain matriculation (see University Regulations).

Procedures for completion of the Dissertation and Oral Examination are as follows:

  1. The student submits the Dissertation to the Adviser.
  2. With the approval of the Adviser and Program Director, the student appoints two Examiners who will join the Doctoral Committee in reviewing and approving the Dissertation and Oral Examination.
  3. With the Adviser’s consent, the student submits the Dissertation to the full Doctoral Committee and the Examiners. 
  4. Upon preliminary approval of the Dissertation by a majority among the members of the Doctoral Committee and the Examiners, the Oral Examination is held.  This examination is focused on the results of the study, the student’s interpretation of the results, and the student’s dissemination plan. 
  5. Upon approval of the Oral Examination and final approval of the Dissertation by a majority among the members of the Doctoral Committee and the Examiners, the student is awarded the degree of Doctor of Education (Ed.D.). 

Return to Program Information Return to: Program Information