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    Hofstra University
   
 
  Oct 17, 2017
 
 
    
2017-2018 Undergraduate Bulletin

Pre-Health (Pre-Medical) Studies With a Concentration in Humanities or Social Sciences, BA Major in


Administered by the Departments of Concentration:

Professor Sharryn Kasmir, Chairperson of Anthropology
Professor Ilaria Marchesi, Adviser of the Classics Program
Professor Karyn Valerius, Director of the Disability Studies Program
Professor Craig Rustici, Chairperson of English and Creative Writing
Professor Grant Saff, Chairperson of Global Studies and Geography
Professor Nathalie Robinson, Chairperson of Music
Professor Kathleen Wallace, Chairperson of Philosophy
Professor John Teehan, Chairperson of Religion
Professor Carole Ferrand, Chairperson of Speech-Language-Hearing Sciences

Students must also seek advisement from the University Advisers for Pre-Health Studies.

The BA major in pre-health studies with a concentration in the humanities or the social sciences prepares students for medical, dental, or veterinary school by requiring, within the context of a broad education in the liberal arts and sciences, the courses in the sciences and mathematics needed for admission to professional degree programs in the health sciences, as well as a concentration in one specific field within either the humanities or the social sciences. Students are required to seek advisement from pre-health advisers and from the chairperson of the department of the elected concentration.

Graduation Requirements:


Candidates for graduation must complete:

  1. All general requirements for the Bachelor of Arts; see Hofstra College of Liberal Arts and Sciences BA Requirements  and;
  2. All science courses required for admission to medical, dental, or veterinary school:
  1. One statistics course, selected from:

and at least one additional course chosen from:

  1. Also recommended:

for medical school:

for veterinary school:

for dental school: courses in the fine arts (for example, sculpture or jewelry-making) that develop manual dexterity

All students planning on taking the MCATs are strongly encouraged to take at least one of the following:

  1. All requirements for one of the concentrations listed below. 

Anthropology


Professor Cheryl Mwaria, Chairperson

The concentration in anthropology will introduce students to the core concepts in anthropology, including the crosscultural study of the physical and cultural adaptations to problems of disease, and help them develop an appreciation of human biological, sociocultural, and linguistic variation through space and time.

For the concentration in anthropology, 21 s.h. of course work:

4) Two additional courses


in anthropology .

Comparative Literature and Languages: Classics


Professor Ilaria Marchesi, Adviser of the Classics Program

The concentration in classics will introduce students to the literature and culture of antiquity, while helping them develop critical thinking and important oral and written communication skills. It will also provide an important understanding of the classical roots of medical terminology, as well of the origins of medical thought and perception of the body in antiquity.

For the concentration in classics, 21 s.h. of course work:

  1. 6 s.h. in Latin or ancient Greek;
  2. 12 s.h. in classical literature in CLL or LIT;
  3. LING 111 .

Creative Writing


Professor Craig Rustici, Chairperson

The concentration in creative writing and literature introduces students to the core skills in imaginative writing and literary analysis, including introductory and advanced writing seminars in the genres of poetry, prose, playwriting, and creative nonfiction, and courses in the interpretation of literature.

For the concentration in Creative Writing and Literature, 21 s.h. of course work:

1) General Creative Writing seminar:


3) Select 6 s.h. in English (ENGL) courses.


4) Select 3 s.h. in Creative Writing (CRWR) or English (ENGL) courses.


Disability Studies


Professor Karyn Valerius, Director of the Disability Studies Program

The concentration in disability studies develops “disability literacy” by introducing students to the distinction between “impairment,” an anomaly in the form or function of a particular person’s body, and “disability,” which comprises social and cultural responses – attitudinal, architectural, legislative, etc. – to anomalous bodies. The disability studies concentration explores how disability is expressed in systems of representation such as literature, film, and mass media; defined by legislation; understood by philosophy and ethics; created and accommodated (or not) by economies and methods of production.

For the concentration in Disability Studies, 21 s.h. of course work:

1) 6 semester hours of required course work in disability studies, as follows:


English and American Literature


Professor Craig Rustici, Chairperson

The concentration in English and American literature introduces students to the core skills in literary appreciation and analysis, including foundation courses in interpretation, introductory courses in national literary traditions, and advanced work in authors, topics, or fields.

For the concentration in English and American Literature, 21 s.h. of course work:

1) The following two courses:


3) Select 6 s.h. from 100-level ENGL courses.


4) Select 6 s.h. from 100-level ENGL or CRWR courses (any combination).


Geography


Professor Grant Saff, Chairperson

The concentration in geography will introduce students to core concepts in geography and train students in critical thinking, help students develop important oral and written communication skills, and introduce students to important elements in understanding how the study of disease and health issues are rooted in geographical understandings of place, space and culture.

For the concentration in geography, 21 s.h. of course work:

Global Studies


Professor Grant Saff, Chairperson

The concentration in global studies will allow students to explore the core concepts of “globalization” from an interdisciplinary perspective. The concentration will train students in critical thinking, help students develop important oral and written communication skills, and introduce students to important elements in understanding how globalization has impacted the spread of disease vectors and the ways in which societal health issues are fundamentally tied to a study of global economic, political, and cultural processes.

For the concentration in global studies, 21 s.h. of course work:

  1. GS 001 , 002 ; GEOG 001 ;
  2. Select any two courses from the electives in global economics, politics and culture, as listed under the BA major in Global Studies .
  3. Select any two courses from the regional area studies electives as defined under the BA major in Global Studies .

Music


Professor Nathalie G. Robinson, Chairperson

The concentration in music will offer students course work in musical performance (private lessons, small ensembles, band, orchestra, chorus, jazz band), music theory and composition, music history and literature, music merchandising, and jazz and commercial music. 

For the concentration in music, 21 s.h. of course work is required as follows:

1. Music Performance – Semester Hours: 6


3. Music Elective – Semester Hours: 3


Any 100-level music course , selected under advisement.

Philosophy


Professor Kathleen Wallace, Chairperson

The concentration in philosophy will introduce students to core ideas in the philosophical tradition, train students in critical thinking and ethical reasoning, help students develop important oral and written communication skills, and introduce students to important elements in the intellectual roots of medicine as a science and healing practice.

For the concentration in philosophy, 21 s.h. of course work, with at least 12 s.h. at the 100 level, including:

1) Core philosophical background - Total Semester Hours: 6


2) At least one course in ethical reasoning:


3) At least one upper-level philosophy course in scientific thought and reasoning:


4) Electives - Total Semester Hours: 9


Chosen from among any philosophy courses (that also satisfy, in conjunction with the student’s selections in [2] and [3], the requirement of 12 s.h. at the 100 level).

Religion


Professor Ann Burlein, Chairperson

The concentration in religion will introduce students to the overlap between medicine and religion, as well as equip students with skills for negotiating issues that arise in health care due to religious diversity.

For the concentration in religion, at least 21 s.h. of course work:

  1. RELI 010  and 086 ;
  2. Electives selected from any RELI courses.

Speech-Language-Hearing Sciences


Professor Carole Ferrand, Chairperson

The concentration in speech-language-hearing sciences will introduce students to the study of communication disorders across the lifespan and provide the appropriate background in the theories, methods, and research relevant for advanced study in either speech-language pathology or audiology.

1) For the concentration in speech-language pathology - Total Semester Hours: 21


including:

2) For the concentration in audiology - Total Semester Hours: 21


including: