Feb 08, 2023  
2020-2021 Undergraduate Bulletin 
    
2020-2021 Undergraduate Bulletin [ARCHIVED BULLETIN]

Course Descriptions


 

Accounting (ACCT)

  
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    ACCT 101 - Financial Accounting

    Semester Hours: 3
    Fall, Spring

    Introductory course in the practical applications of financial accounting. Topics include preparation and analysis of financial statements using spreadsheet software or other analytical tools, and measurement of the results of business activities related to cash, accounts receivable, inventory, long lived assets, liabilities and stockholders equity. Current regulatory, ethical and social issues in accounting are explored.

    Prerequisite(s)/Course Notes:
    Prerequisite/Corequisite: IT 015 and IT 001  or permission of the department chairperson.



  
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    ACCT 102 - Managerial Accounting

    Semester Hours: 3
    Fall, Spring

    Course provides students with an understanding of concepts that are fundamental to the use of management accounting. Topics include costing concepts and systems, budgeting, cost-volume-profit analysis, and other managerial accounting concepts. Using accounting data, students will apply course concepts and accounting technologies, including spreadsheet software, to enhance managerial decision-making. Current regulatory, ethical and social issues in accounting are explored.

    Prerequisite(s)/Course Notes:
    ACCT 101 , IT 015, and IT 001 .



  
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    ACCT 123 - Financial Accounting Theory and Practice I

    Semester Hours: 3
    Fall, Spring

    In depth study of accounting theory and its application, specifically focused on transactions related to financial statement preparation, assets and revenues. Some specific topics include inventory, property, plant and equipment and investments.  Utilizing automated accounting information systems, students will apply the steps in the financial accounting process to record and summarize financial transactions. Through data analysis and visualization tools, student will learn how accounting information, such as the balance sheet and income statement, is used as the foundation for decision-making by management, stockholders, creditors, and other stakeholders. Conflicts and shortcomings that exist within the traditional structure of accounting theory, as well as global reporting issues are discussed. Current developments in corporate social responsibility as it relates to applicable financial reporting tools are also explored.

    Prerequisite(s)/Course Notes:
    Prerequisites: IT 001; IT 015 ; ACCT 102 ; sophomore class standing or above, C- or better in ACCT 101 and ACCT 102 (Students who have completed 24 s.h. or above may seek a waiver from the department chairperson.)



  
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    ACCT 124 - Financial Accounting Theory and Practice II

    Semester Hours: 3
    Fall, Spring
    This course is a continuation of ACCT 123.  In depth study of accounting theory and its application, specifically focused on the transactions related to current and long term liabilities and stockholders’ equity.  Majors topics include bonds, leases, earnings per share, income taxes and pensions.  Utilizing automated accounting information systems, students will apply the steps in the financial reporting process to record and summarize financial transactions.  Through data analysis and visualization tools, students will learn how accounting information, such as the balance sheet, statement of stockholders’ equity and statement of cash flows, is used as a basis for decisions by management, stockholders, creditors, and other stakeholders. Conflicts and shortcomings that exist within the traditional structure of accounting theory, as well as global reporting issues are discussed.  Current developments in corporate social responsibility as it relates to applicable financial reporting topics are explored.

    Prerequisite(s)/Course Notes:
    IT 001 ; IT015; ACCT 123 ; FIN 101 ; sophomore class standing or above. (Students who have completed 24 s.h. or above may seek a waiver from the department chairperson.)



  
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    ACCT 125 - Accounting Entities (Advanced)

    Semester Hours: 3
    Fall, Spring

    This course consists of advanced theory and an analytical overview of the accounting problems associated with acquisitions, mergers and the preparation and interpretation of financial reports with respect to the resultant combined corporate entities; translation of foreign financial statements; an introduction to accounting and reporting for not-for-profit organizations; and an analysis of the transactions involved with  partnership formation, operation and termination. Advanced spreadsheet skills will be utilized in analysis and problem-solving. Global perspectives, current accounting regulatory developments and ethical issues are integrated throughout. 

    Prerequisite(s)/Course Notes:
    ACCT 124 ; IT 001; IT 015 , junior class standing or above. Credit given for this course or ACCT 242, not both.



  
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    ACCT 126 - Government and Not-for-Profit Accounting

    Semester Hours: 3
    Periodically
    This course provides a detailed examination and discussion of the accounting principles unique to governmental and not-for-profit entities.  The course focuses on the use of special funds for state and local governments, colleges and universities, hospitals and other health care entities, voluntary health and welfare organization, and other not-for-profit organizations.  Students will learn what characterizes an entity as one for which the GASB is the authoritative standard-setting body versus one for which the FASB is the authoritative standard-setting body and develop an understanding of why two unique sets of accounting principles were developed to serve these entities.

    Prerequisite(s)/Course Notes:
    ACCT 124  or approved equivalent. Credit given for this course or ACCT 243, not both.



  
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    ACCT 128 - Accounting in a Global Environment

    Semester Hours: 3
    Periodically
    Discussion of contemporary debates regarding harmonization of accounting standards. Analysis of the differences among countries regarding their economic and social practices and corresponding accounting systems. Specific countries are discussed, and specific auditing and taxation accounting practices and theories are covered.

    Prerequisite(s)/Course Notes:
    ACCT 102 , junior class standing or above. Credit given for this course or ACCT 232, not both.



  
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    ACCT 129 - Internal Auditing

    Semester Hours: 3
    Periodically
    Course explores the role of the internal audit function in the management of companies. Topics include: reliability and integrity of information; compliance with policies, procedures, laws and regulations; safeguarding of assets; economy and efficiency of operations. The unique ethical considerations affecting the internal audit function are stressed.

    Prerequisite(s)/Course Notes:
    ACCT 102 ; IT 015 ; BAN 001 ; junior class standing or above.



  
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    ACCT 131 - Cost Accounting and Advanced Managerial Accounting Topics

    Semester Hours: 3
    Fall, Spring

    Various cost and advanced managerial accounting concepts are studied. Topics include job-order costing, process costing, budgeting, standard costs, direct costing, by-products and joint products, and other managerial accounting topics. The course will integrate accounting technologies and data analysis to enable students to conduct advanced managerial accounting analysis and make data-driven decisions. Ethical and social considerations relating to managerial decision-making are discussed.

    Prerequisite(s)/Course Notes:
    ACCT 102 , IT 001  and  IT 015 ; Successful Completion of Microsoft Excel Expert Certification;  sophomore class standing or above.  (Students who have completed 24 s.h. or above may seek a class standing waiver from the department chairperson).  



  
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    ACCT 133 - Auditing Theory and Practice

    Semester Hours: 3
    Fall, Spring

    The role and function of the independent auditor in the public and private sectors are emphasized. The ethical, social, economic and political forces that influence the philosophy and conceptual foundations of auditing are covered in depth. Auditing standards and rulings by regulatory agencies are analyzed. Standards that guide the auditor and the methodology used in conducting an audit, forming an opinion, and reporting are covered and illustrated, with a focus on tests of controls and substantive procedures. Students will utilize visualization, automation, and analytical tools to perform auditing procedures.

    Prerequisite(s)/Course Notes:
    ACCT 124 , IT 001, IT 015 , BAN 001 , and senior class standing or permission of the department chairperson. Credit given for this course or ACCT 233, not both.



  
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    ACCT 134 - Advanced Auditing

    Semester Hours: 3
    Periodically
    Concepts of auditing theory and their relationship to recent developments in auditing practice such as the impact of the Sarbanes-Oxley law, the extensive use of information technology and computerized management information systems are analyzed. The impact on the profession of the Public Companies Accounting Oversight’s Board and American Institute of Certified Public Accountants’ pronouncements on auditing standards are evaluated.   

    Prerequisite(s)/Course Notes:
    ACCT 133  or approved equivalent. Credit given for this course or ACCT 234, not both.



  
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    ACCT 135 - Accounting Information Systems

    Semester Hours: 3


    Fall, Spring
    This course explores accounting information systems and how they relate to the accountant’s ability to conduct business and make decisions. The course focuses on transaction cycles with special emphasis on ethics, fraud, and internal controls and targets the needs and responsibilities of accountants as end users of systems, systems designers, and auditors. It includes an introduction of Sarbanes-Oxley and its effects on internal controls, and other relevant topics.

    Prerequisite(s)/Course Notes:
    Prerequisites: ACCT 124  or approved equivalent, senior class standing. Corequisite: ACCT 133 . Credit given for this course or ACCT 208, not both. (Formerly ACCT 127, Computer-based Accounting and Tax Systems.)

     



  
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    ACCT 136 - Fraud Prevention and Detection

    Semester Hours: 3
    Periodically
    To provide in-depth discussion and analysis into the different areas of fraud in asset misappropriations, bribery and corruption, and fraudulent statements. Students will build on existing knowledge of auditing and information systems to explore the areas of fraud for both detection and prevention.

    Prerequisite(s)/Course Notes:
    ACCT 133  or approved equivalent.



  
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    ACCT 137 - Forensic and Investigative Accounting

    Semester Hours: 3
    Periodically
    To provide in-depth discussion and analysis of the complex and evolving area of forensic accounting. The course connects the different roles of accountant as accountant, investigator, valuator and legal assistant in very specialized and vital areas of business. The course will discuss the field and practice of forensic accounting, uncovering accounting crime, courtroom procedures and litigation support, cybercrime and business valuations.

    Prerequisite(s)/Course Notes:
    ACCT 133  or approved equivalent.



  
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    ACCT 139 - Introduction to Strategic Accounting Technologies

    Semester Hours: 3
    This course will focus on the introductory application of current accounting technologies and software programs to collect and analyze accounting data sets. It concentrates on developing students’ competencies in current and emerging technologies. It focuses on how accounting professionals can effectively and efficiently assess and implement relevant technologies to satisfy strategic accounting needs. Discussions will focus on the interrelationships of these technologies with the accounting information system, including internal controls, ethical issues, fraud, forensics, risk assessment, and/or cybersecurity. Students will build and develop introductory skills in core accounting technologies while solving accounting problems, enabling them to provide meaningful insights into accounting-related data. Topics include current and emerging technologies such as artificial intelligence, basic programming (e.g., coding and workflow automation), blockchain, data collection, management, and analysis related to accounting.  

    Prerequisite(s)/Course Notes:
    ACCT 124 ; junior class standing with Expert Excel Certification.



  
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    ACCT 140 - Applying Strategic Accounting Technologies for Decision Making

    Semester Hours: 3
    In this capstone course, students will combine accounting and technology skills learned throughout the accounting curriculum to provide meaningful insights into accounting questions.  Given an accounting issue, students will focus on using oral and written communications to frame the problem(s) and ask the right questions, and will critically analyze and apply appropriate technological tools to find solution(s).  Students will be required to demonstrate their technical agility by selecting the appropriate technology to analyze, design, implement, automate, and/or evaluate accounting processes. Upon completion of this course, students will be able to leverage technologies to understand and analyze accounting issues and produce data driven solutions for accounting problems.

    Prerequisite(s)/Course Notes:
    ACCT 139; senior class standing



  
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    ACCT 142 - Taxation for Non-Accounting Majors

    Semester Hours: 3
    Periodically
    Basics of the federal tax system for individuals and business entities. Topics will include the basic theory of tax concepts, calculation of tax, and tax ethics.

    Prerequisite(s)/Course Notes:
    ACCT 101  and sophomore standing or above. This course may not taken by accounting majors or minors.



  
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    ACCT 143 - Income Tax Accounting I

    Semester Hours: 3
    Fall, Spring

    Analysis of the Federal Income Tax laws pertaining to individuals, including their meaning, application, and associated ethical and global considerations. The course employs appropriate tax technologies to build skills in tax research, compliance, planning, and analysis of federal taxation of individuals.

    Prerequisite(s)/Course Notes:
    ACCT 124  and senior class standing. Credit given for this course or ACCT 215, not both.



  
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    ACCT 144 - Income Tax Accounting II

    Semester Hours: 3
    Periodically

    Analysis of the Federal Income Tax laws pertaining to business entities, including their meaning, application, ethical and international considerations relating to business entities. Partnerships, C corporations and S corporations will be the focus of this course. The course employs appropriate tax technologies to build skills in tax research, compliance, planning and analysis of federal taxation of business entities.

    Prerequisite(s)/Course Notes:
    ACCT 143  and senior class standing. Credit given for this course or ACCT 215, not both.



  
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    ACCT 145 - Advanced Tax Topics

    Semester Hours: 3
    Periodically
    In-depth analysis of advanced topics in taxation from mostly the federal tax law perspective, but also exploring state and local as well as international jurisdictions. Topics will include tax research, federal practice and procedure, fiduciary responsibilities, taxation of estates and trusts, tax credits and the alternative minimum.

    Prerequisite(s)/Course Notes:
    ACCT 144  and senior class standing.



  
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    ACCT 150 - Advanced Financial Accounting Theory

    Semester Hours: 3
    Periodically
    Building on the topics learned in Financial Accounting Theory and Practice, this course focuses on using applied research to solve more complex accounting and reporting issues. Through real-world case analysis and issue-based research approaches, students will develop critical thinking and problem-solving skills.

    Prerequisite(s)/Course Notes:
    ACCT 124  or approved equivalent, and senior class standing. Credit given for this course or ACCT 210, not both.



  
  
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    ACCT 156 A-Z - Seminar in Special Topics in Accounting

    Semester Hours: 1-2


    Periodically

    Current topics are explored through a variety of methods, such as lectures, projects and case studies.  As individual subjects are selected, each is assigned a letter (A-Z) which is affixed to the course number.  Specific titles and course descriptions for special topics courses are available in the online class schedule.

    Prerequisite(s)/Course Notes:
    ACCT 102 - Managerial Accounting 

    ACCT101 and/or additional specific prerequisites for special topics courses are available in the online class schedule.



  
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    ACCT 157 A-Z - Seminar: Special Topics in Accounting

    Semester Hours: 3
    Periodically
    An advanced in-depth treatment of special topics. Current topics are explored through a variety of methods, such as lectures, projects and case studies.

    Prerequisite(s)/Course Notes:
    ACCT 125  and any additional prerequisites as stated in the course schedule. As individual subjects are selected, each is assigned a letter (A-Z) which is affixed to the course number. Students may take up to two of these courses to fulfill their major requirements so long as each seminar has a different letter designation. These courses may only be taken in addition to the required courses. These courses do not qualify for CPA examination credit. Specific titles and course descriptions for special topics courses are available in the online class schedule.



  
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    ACCT 174 - Business Internship

    Semester Hours: 1-3
    Fall, Spring
    Actual practical experience in an approved setting open to junior and senior accounting majors. Students work a minimum of 40 hours for 1 credit or a minimum of 80 hours for 2 credits or a minimum of 120 hours for 3 credits in a structured accounting program offered by a for-profit or not-for-profit organization.

    Prerequisite(s)/Course Notes:
    Permission of department chairperson, a minimum grade point average of 2.5 in accounting courses and 2.5 overall, ACCT 124 , junior class standing or above.  NOTE:  Students may take this course for 1, 2, or 3 s.h., and may take the course more than once, with a maximum of 3 s.h. earned.  Credits earned count toward general degree requirements but do not satisfy accounting major requirements.



  
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    ACCT 185 - Internship in Accounting

    Semester Hours: 3
    Fall, Spring
    A work-study program open to senior accounting majors. Students work a minimum of 120 hours in a structured accounting training program offered by a for-profit or not-for-profit organization.

    Prerequisite(s)/Course Notes:
    Permission of department chairperson, a minimum grade point average of 3.0 in accounting courses and 3.0 overall, ACCT 124 . Corequisite: related course in the area of the internship. (Students who do not meet these requirements, see ACCT 174 .)



  
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    ACCT 190 - Departmental Honors Candidacy: Essay

    Semester Hours: 3
    Fall, Spring
    Research for and the writing of a substantial essay in the field of accounting. Open only to senior accounting majors who are eligible for and desire to graduate with departmental honors and who secure, before registration, written permission of the department chairperson.

    Prerequisite(s)/Course Notes:
    A minimum grade point average of 3.5 in accounting and 3.4 overall.




African Studies (AFST)

  
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    AFST 012F - First-Year Seminar

    Semester Hours: 3
    Fall
    This course gives first-year students the opportunity to work in a seminar format with a member of the faculty in an area of the faculty member’s research interests.

    Prerequisite(s)/Course Notes:
    The course is open to first-year students only. Topics vary by semester. Consult the class schedule for proper category listing. Students may take only one 12F or 12S seminar.



  
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    AFST 012S - First-Year Seminar

    Semester Hours: 1-3
    Spring
    This course gives first-year students the opportunity to work in a seminar format with a member of the faculty in an area of the faculty member’s research interests.

    Prerequisite(s)/Course Notes:
    The course is open to first-year students only. Topics vary by semester. Specific titles and course descriptions are available here. Students may take only one 12F or 12S seminar.



  
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    AFST 014F - First-Year Seminar

    Semester Hours: 3-4
    Fall
    This course gives first-year students the opportunity to work in a seminar format with a member of the faculty in an area of the faculty member’s research interests.

    Prerequisite(s)/Course Notes:
    The course is open to first-year students only. Topics vary by semester. This course is offered for distribution credit. Students may take only one 14F or 12F seminar and only one 14S or 12S seminar.



  
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    AFST 014S - First-Year Seminar

    Semester Hours: 3-4
    Spring
    This course gives first-year students the opportunity to work in a seminar format with a member of the faculty in an area of the faculty member’s research interests.

    Prerequisite(s)/Course Notes:
    The course is open to first-year students only. Topics vary by semester. This course is offered for distribution credit. Students may take only one 14F or 12F seminar and only one 14S or 12S seminar.



  
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    AFST 032 - (BH, CC) Women and Development

    Semester Hours: 3
    Periodically
    Examination of the historical transformation of the roles of Asian and African women in relation to the different modes of socioeconomic organization of their respective societies. Critical assessment of the impact of social, religious, economic and political systems in defining the status of women in these societies.

    Prerequisite(s)/Course Notes:
    Same as ANTH 032 . Credit given for this course or SOC 032 , not both.



  
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    AFST 039 - (CC, CP) The Dance Practices of the African Diaspora and the American Experience

    Semester Hours: 3
    Fall
    This is a studio course introducing students to American dance aesthetics and practices with a focus on how its evolution has been influenced by African American choreographers and dancers. An ongoing study of movement practices from traditional African dances, dances of the African Diaspora, American Jazz dance, modern dance, and American Ballet will be complemented by readings, video viewings, guest speakers and creation of dance studies.

    Prerequisite(s)/Course Notes:
    Same as DNCE 039 .



  
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    AFST 043 - (LT, CC) Decolonizing the Mind: Contemporary Literature from Africa to Southeast Asia

    Semester Hours: 3
    Periodically
    Examination of literary voices from Francophone countries including Senegal, Algeria, Tunisia. Topics include decolonization and the African identity, the search for self, the contradictions of life in the colonies and racism. Readings include works by Memmi, Ben Jelloun, Snow-Fall, Senghor. All works are read and discussed in English.

    Prerequisite(s)/Course Notes:
    Same as FRLT 043 .



  
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    AFST 051 - Readings in African Thought

    Semester Hours: 1
    Fall, Spring
    Each student, in consultation with the instructor, selects a key topic or a prominent figure in the world with African experience and explores the ideas generated by and around the topic or personality.



  
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    AFST 052 - Readings in African Thought

    Semester Hours: 1
    Fall, Spring
    Each student, in consultation with the instructor, selects a key topic or a prominent figure in the world with African experience and explores the ideas generated by and around the topic or personality.



  
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    AFST 102 - (BH) African Cultures

    Semester Hours: 3
    Every Other Year
    The continent of Africa is the birthplace of humanity and an area of enormous cultural diversity. This course will examine representative contemporary African societies against a backdrop of social, political and economic change.

    Prerequisite(s)/Course Notes:
    Same as ANTH 102 .



  
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    AFST 108 - (BH) Afro-American Culture

    Semester Hours: 3
    Every Other Year
    Consideration and analysis of the culture of black Americans and black communities; emphasis is on enculturation processes and social forms resulting from antecedents of African culture and pressures from the dominant American culture. Emphasis is on the legacy of slavery.

    Prerequisite(s)/Course Notes:
    Same as ANTH 108 .



  
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    AFST 110 - (BH, CC) African Politics

    Semester Hours: 3
    Fall, Spring
    Investigation of the political culture of Africa which combines indigenous heritage and culture with European colonial influences; and a comparative analysis of political development in African states including struggles for democratization, nationbuilding and socioeconomic development.

    Prerequisite(s)/Course Notes:
    Same as PSC 110 .



  
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    AFST 111 - Economic Development in Sub-Saharan Africa

    Semester Hours: 3
    Periodically
    Development theories, practices and results evident in the region’s primary industries such as agriculture, pastoral farming, mining and manufacturing from the colonial period to the present. Precolonial socioeconomic formations in each country within the region are examined as background to transformations fostered by colonialism.

    Prerequisite(s)/Course Notes:
    One introductory course in economics. Same as ECO 111 .



  
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    AFST 111A - Politics of Race in the United States

    Semester Hours: 3
    Every Other Year
    An analysis in depth of the manner in which racial considerations have shaped the American political culture and the extent to which these considerations have affected the formation of public policy on all levels of government. The main emphasis, however, shall be on the national level.

    Prerequisite(s)/Course Notes:
    Same as PSC 111 .



  
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    AFST 115 - The Afro-American in American History, 1619-1865

    Semester Hours: 3
    Every Other Year
    From the African origins of black slavery through emancipation and the Civil War. Emphasis is given to the slave trade, the nature of black society under slavery in both North and South, the relation of the American Revolution to the antislavery movement, and the role of blacks in Abolitionism and the Civil War.

    Prerequisite(s)/Course Notes:
    Credit given for this course or HIST 115 , not both.



  
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    AFST 116 - The Afro-American in American History, 1865 to the Present

    Semester Hours: 3
    Every other year
    Emphasis is given to the end of slavery and the successes and failures of Reconstruction, the nature of black society in the era of national segregation and the changes developing during and after the two World Wars. The struggle for civil, educational, economic and political equality is traced in the context of an emerging diversified black leadership, provided by such figures as Booker T. Washington, W. E. B. DuBois, Marcus Garvey, Malcolm X and Martin Luther King, Jr.

    Prerequisite(s)/Course Notes:
    Credit given for this course or HIST 116 , not both.



  
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    AFST 117A - (CC) History of Africa to 1800

    Semester Hours: 3
    Every other year
    History of Africa from the traditional period to the beginning of the modern era. Emphasis on Bantu migration, precolonial society and the slave trade.

    Prerequisite(s)/Course Notes:
    Same as HIST 117A .



  
  
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    AFST 119 - (HP) Blacks and Jews: Interrelation in the Diaspora

    Semester Hours: 3
    Periodically
    An examination of the relations between African-American and Jewish-Americans in the United States from the period of the “Grand Alliance” (ca., 1910-1967) to the current moment of “crisis.” Through the investigation of literature, sociological analysis, historical case studies, opinion pieces, and works of art, this course illuminates the complex and shifting relations between African-Americans and Jewish-Americans and their significance for questions of identity in the modern United States.

    Prerequisite(s)/Course Notes:
    Same as HIST 119 JWST 119R .



  
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    AFST 120 - (BH, CC) African Labor Economics

    Semester Hours: 3
    Periodically
    Work, working people and working class movements in modern Africa are the focus of this introductory course. Through contemporary and historical cross-country studies of workers in a wide variety of economic, political and institutional settings, we will evaluate rival perspectives on a host of interesting and controversial topics. These include changing occupational and industrial formations, gender and racial/ethnic gaps in jobs and income, poverty and inequality, immigration, urban informal employment, worker training and health care, labor unions, government’s regulatory and job creation roles. This is a distribution course in both the Behavioral Social Sciences and the Cross-Cultural categories.

    Prerequisite(s)/Course Notes:
    One introductory economics course or LABR 001A  or instructor’s permission. Credit given either for this course or ECO 120  or LABR 120 , not both.



  
  
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    AFST 122 - Health and Disease in Africa: A Medical Anthropology Perspective

    Semester Hours: 3
    Periodically
    This course focuses on the myriad factors contributing to disease in Africa and the various ways in which African cultures respond behaviorally to disease and illness. We explore the etiology and clinical manifestations of disease and illness and the practices directed toward the alleviation of disease and the promotion of health against a backdrop of the political economy of African nations.



  
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    AFST 123 - Life and Death in the Black Community

    Semester Hours: 3
    Periodically
    This course introduces students to the impact of race, class and gender on the health status of African Americans in the United States. It focuses on concepts of race, ethnicity and the perception of human differences; the biological basis of human variation; and the impact of state policies on patterns of disease, reproduction, and death among African Americans with an emphasis on the ethical questions these policies pose.

    Prerequisite(s)/Course Notes:
    One of the following: HIST 115 , 116 ; ANTH 108 .



  
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    AFST 124 - The Francophone Experience in North Africa

    Semester Hours: 3
    Periodically
    An introduction to Algerian, Moroccan and Tunisian cultures from the colonial era to post-colonialism through an analysis of literature and film.

    Prerequisite(s)/Course Notes:
    FREN 004 . Same as FREN 122 .



  
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    AFST 134 - (BH) Race Relations in the United States

    Semester Hours: 3
    Fall, Spring
    Examination of major patterns of racial and ethnic relations in the United States. Historical, contemporary and cross-cultural data are combined with prevalent theoretical perspectives to provide a basic understanding of race and ethnic relations as enduring and embedded aspects of United States society. Topics covered include the political and economic dynamics of race relations, institutional racism, prejudice and discrimination. Particular attention is paid to the African-American experience from slavery to the present.

    Prerequisite(s)/Course Notes:
    Credit given for this course or SOC 134 , not both.



  
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    AFST 139 - (LT, CC) The African Novel

    Semester Hours: 3
    Introduces selected African novelists of the 20th century such as Chinua Achebe, Sembene Ousmane, Ayi Kwei Armah, Ngugi wa Thiong’o, Bessie Head, Buchi Emecheta and Solomon Mutswairo. Analysis of African literary themes, such as traditional and modern conflicts, resistance to colonialism, effects of independence, neocolonial dilemmas and images of the African woman.

    Prerequisite(s)/Course Notes:
    Same as ENGL 139 .



  
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    AFST 140 - African American Literature I

    Semester Hours: 3
    Fall, Spring
    The origins of an African American literary tradition from the Colonial period to the early 20th century. Themes include the African Diaspora, slavery, folk culture, race, and social equality. Such authors as Equiano, Wheatley, Douglass, Brown, Jacobs, Harper, Washington, and Du Bois.

    Prerequisite(s)/Course Notes:
    WSC 001 . Credit given for this course or ENGL 140 , not both.



  
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    AFST 141 - (LT) African American Literature II

    Semester Hours: 3
    Fall, Spring
    The growth of African American literature from the Harlem Renaissance to the present. Such topics as migration, African heritage, protest, vernacular, and gender. Writers include Hughes, Hurston, Wright, Brooks, Ellison, Baldwin, Baraka, Walker, Morrison, and Wilson.

    Prerequisite(s)/Course Notes:
    WSC 001 . Credit given for this course or ENGL 141 , not both.



  
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    AFST 142 - (CC) Archaeology of the African Diaspora

    Semester Hours: 3

    Periodically
    This course examines archaeological and historical studies of people of African descent in the Americas, beginning with the transatlantic slave trade to the early twentieth century.  The major objective of this course is to understand the diverse material worlds of African Diasporic communities within the greater historiographies of the Atlantic world.  The course reviews archaeological methods, material patterns of African and African-American cultural practices, and the public meanings of minority archaeologies.

    Prerequisite(s)/Course Notes:
    Same as ANTH 142 .



  
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    AFST 143 - Economic Development

    Semester Hours: 3
    Periodically
    Problems of the developing economies of the world, theories of development, requirements for and obstacles to economic development, policies to promote economic redevelopment.

    Prerequisite(s)/Course Notes:
    One introductory course in economics. Same as ECO 143 .



  
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    AFST 154 - African Humanism

    Semester Hours: 3
    Fall, Spring
    African philosophical and religious systems, attitudes and the ways in which those attitudes are reflected in intellectual ideas and national cultures.



  
  
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    AFST 156 - Economic and Social History of the Caribbean from Slavery to National Independence

    Semester Hours: 3
    Periodically
    The plantation economy and the evolution of social classes in selected countries.



  
  
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    AFST 168 - (CC) Caribbean Experience in Literature

    Semester Hours: 3
    An exploration of the literature of the English-speaking Caribbean (Antigua, Barbados, Belize, Guyana, Jamaica, St. Kitts, St. Lucia, and Trinidad). Emphasis is placed on the ways in which this literature deals with the experience of slavery, colonization, and independence and the ways in which it treats such issues and themes as regional identity, color, race, class, gender, and family relations. Attention is also given to the ways in which the literature and culture of the Caribbean makes use of such cultural elements as Carnival and vernacular Africanized English known as patois and creole.

    Prerequisite(s)/Course Notes:
    WSC 001 . Same as ENGL 168 .



  
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    AFST 187 A-Z - (CC) Special Topics

    Semester Hours: 3
    Periodically
    These courses deal with innovative or advanced topics and may include field projects. Students prepare individual projects on a research theme.

    Prerequisite(s)/Course Notes:
    May be repeated for credit when topics vary. Specific titles and course descriptions for special topics courses are available in the online class schedule.



  
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    AFST 193 - (LT) The Color of Literature

    Semester Hours: 3
    Periodically
    This course explores works by ‘writers of color’ and investigates the notion of assigning racial, ethnic, and cultural identity labels to works of literature. Does literature have a color? Can it? How is this relevant to literary study? In a cross-cultural context, we will examine how works of literature reflect the history and discussion of race, ethnicity, and culture in a given society. These works also participate in and give form to issues and debates that extend beyond the work back into society at large.

    Prerequisite(s)/Course Notes:
    Same as CLL 193 .




American Sign Language (ASL)

  
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    ASL 001 - (LA) American Sign Language I

    Semester Hours: 3
    Fall

    Introduction to American Sign Language (ASL), the natural language of Deaf people in the United States and Canada. Students will learn basic vocabulary, grammar, semantics and conversational skills. Students will also be introduced to the history, social norms and cultural aspects of the Deaf community.

    Prerequisite(s)/Course Notes:
    Formerly ASL 191. Credit will be given for ASL 001 or 191, not both.



  
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    ASL 002 - (LA) American Sign Language II

    Semester Hours: 3
    Spring

    ​Continuation of the basic ASL course. This course will emphasize vocabulary building, grammar, conversational skills and mastery of expressive narrative skills.

    Prerequisite(s)/Course Notes:
    ASL 001  or equivalent. Credit will be given for ASL 002 or 192, not both. Formerly ASL 192.



  
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    ASL 003 - (LA) American Sign Language III

    Semester Hours: 3


    Periodically

    This is the third course in a series, and is designed to review, develop, and refine proficiency in the student’s knowledge and use of American Sign Language. Emphasis is on demonstrating expressive skills in the language. The course will include discussion of current issues and trends affecting the American Deaf Community.

    Prerequisite(s)/Course Notes:
    ASL 001 , 002 , or permission of instructor. Credit will be given for ASL 003 or 193, not both. Formerly ASL 193.

     




American Studies (AMST)

  
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    AMST 001D - Creating America’s Culture

    Semester Hours: 3
    Periodically
    An introduction to the interdisciplinary approach to understanding America which takes as its theme the active principles at work in this country by which a culture, distinct from that of other nations, was, and is formed.

    Prerequisite(s)/Course Notes:
    WSC 001  and 002 .



  
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    AMST 012F - First-Year Seminar

    Semester Hours: 3
    Fall
    This course gives first-year students the opportunity to work in a seminar format with a member of the faculty in an area of the faculty member’s research interests.

    Prerequisite(s)/Course Notes:
    The course is open to first-year students only. Topics vary by semester. Consult the class schedule for proper category listing. Students may take only one 12F or 12S seminar.



  
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    AMST 012S - First-Year Seminar

    Semester Hours: 1-3
    This course gives first-year students the opportunity to work in a seminar format with a member of the faculty in an area of the faculty member’s research interests.

    Prerequisite(s)/Course Notes:
    The course is open to first-year students only. Topics vary by semester. Students may take only one 12F or 12S seminar.



  
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    AMST 014F - First-Year Seminar

    Semester Hours: 3-4
    Fall
    This course gives first-year students the opportunity to work in a seminar format with a member of the faculty in an area of the faculty member’s research interests.

    Prerequisite(s)/Course Notes:
    The course is open to first-year students only. Topics vary by semester. Students may take only one 14F or 12F seminar and only one 14S or 12S seminar.



  
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    AMST 014S - First-Year Seminar

    Semester Hours: 3-4
    Spring
    This course gives first-year students the opportunity to work in a seminar format with a member of the faculty in an area of the faculty member’s research interests.

    Prerequisite(s)/Course Notes:
    The course is open to first-year students only. Topics vary by semester. Students may take only one 14F or 12F seminar and only one 14S or 12S seminar.



  
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    AMST 100 - Departmental Honors Candidacy: Essay

    Semester Hours: 3
    Fall, Spring
    Research and writing of a substantial essay or execution and presentation of a creative project. Written analysis on any subject relating to the disciplines encompassed by the field of American Studies.

    Prerequisite(s)/Course Notes:
    Open only to eligible senior American Studies majors  who wish to graduate with honors. Written permission of the instructor supervising the essay or project must be obtained before registration. Cumulative grade point average must conform with departmental honors as defined under eligibility requirements . May not be taken on a Pass/D+/D/Fail basis.



  
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    AMST 145 A-Z - Special Topics in American Studies

    Semester Hours: 3


    Every Other Semester
    An exploratory course analyzing American culture through the works of American writers. Each semester centers upon particular themes, ideas or topics broad enough to permit the student to become acquainted with the diversity of America’s past and present.

     

    Current Special Topics

    AMST 145E: Literature, Trama & Climate Crisis

    This course centers on an urgent question: since we know the climate crisis will mean global catastrophe unless we very quickly mount a meaningful response, why have we so far utterly failed to do so? We’ll approach that question in light of the growth, over the past few decades, of a cultural interest in trauma, especially the development of “trauma theory” and of what we might call the literature of trauma. This will help us consider, for example, what kind of knowledge is at stake when we say we “know” that catastrophe will follow from inadequate action; what does it mean, that is, to become aware of reality if such awareness challenges your capacity to process what you see? We’ll read some trauma theory (from, for example, Cathy Caruth’s Unclaimed Experience and Roger Luckhurst’s The Trauma Question), but will focus mostly on works of literature. For the most part, these won’t engage climate change per se, but will be texts that struggle with trying to give shape and meaning to experiences that seem, by definition, to defy such attempts. In addition to selections from trauma theory, possible readings include W. G. Sebald’s Austerlitz, D. M. Thomas’s The White Hotel, and Art Spiegelman’s Maus (texts that grapple with the problem of representing “the Holocaust”), Russell Hoban’s Riddley Walker and Cormac McCarthy’s The Road (grappling with how to represent a nuclear apocalypse, and the consequent climate change), and Toni Morrison’s Beloved (grappling with how to represent knowledge of slavery). We’ll also compare such attempts to formulate traumatic knowledge with the sort of widespread representations of climate change that construct it in the public sphere.
    Cross-listed with ENGL 198L (93639).

    Prerequisite(s)/Course Notes:
    Two of the following: ENGL 070 , 071 , 072 , 144 ; HIST 013 , 014C , or permission of the instructor. Course may be repeated for credit when topics vary. Specific titles and course descriptions for special topics courses are available in the online class schedule. (Formerly 145; Readings in American Studies.)



  
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    AMST 146 - Seminar in American Studies

    Semester Hours: 3
    Every other semester
    Each semester some aspect of American culture is chosen as the organizing theme of the seminar. In addition, students will work on individual research problems.

    Prerequisite(s)/Course Notes:
    Permission of the instructor.



  
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    AMST 151A - Independent Readings in American Studies

    Semester Hours: 1-3
    Every other semester
    Students will read selections assigned by the instructor and prepare written or oral reports.

    Prerequisite(s)/Course Notes:
    Permission of instructor.




Anthropology (ANTH)

  
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    ANTH 001 - (BH) Human Evolution in Anthropological Perspective

    Semester Hours: 3-4
    Fall, Spring
    Human origins are reviewed in light of evolutionary theory, recent research on living primates and the fossil record. Concepts of both human nature and culture are defined in evolutionary terms and critiqued with an eye to unraveling the distinctly human capacities for conjugal and extended family life, for symbolic communication and for social contracts that establish the minimal conditions for political order.

    Prerequisite(s)/Course Notes:
    (Formerly Human Evolution in Philosophical Perspective.)



  
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    ANTH 003 - (BH, CC) Cultural Anthropology

    Semester Hours: 3
    Fall, Spring
    Cultural anthropologists study the different ways in which social groups organize their daily lives. This class introduces students to methods, concepts, and fundamental topics of research in cultural anthropology.  It treats such topics as gender and sexuality, race and ethnicity, class and status, and the impact of globalization on sustainability. Case studies illustrate how people interact with their environment, organize their economic activities, and regulate social power, authority, and influence.

    Prerequisite(s)/Course Notes:
    (Formerly Culture, Tradition and Transformation.)



  
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    ANTH 004 - (BH, CC) World Cultures

    Semester Hours: 3
    Fall, Spring
    Understanding global diversity and appreciating cultural difference are two principles of anthropology that every student will find useful, regardless of their major or career path. Using a holistic, comparative, and cultural-relativistic perspective, this course examines how communities of people, including our own community, live in an increasingly globalized world. This class will “make the strange familiar and the familiar strange” by encouraging students to critically reflect on the ways they think about, act in, and interpret the world around them.

    Prerequisite(s)/Course Notes:
    (Formerly Cultural Diversity.)



  
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    ANTH 005 - (BH) Archaeology: Recovering our Material Past

    Semester Hours: 3
    Fall, Spring
    Archaeology is the study of the recent and distant past using material remains. The class includes a comprehensive survey of methods and theories used by archaeologists to recover data and interpret past lives through material culture. Case studies and central topics of archaeological research illustrate the materiality of social, economic, and political organization and practice. Because archaeology is conducted in living communities, the final section of this course considers ethics in archaeology and its relevance in the modern world.

    Prerequisite(s)/Course Notes:
    Formerly Archaeology: Living in the Material World.)



  
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    ANTH 012 - Families Cross-Culturally

    Semester Hours: 3
    Periodically
    Advanced study emphasizing detailed analysis of social and community structures and political, economic and religious institutions. Materials are selected from a wide range of primitive and other nonwestern societies.

    Prerequisite(s)/Course Notes:
    ANTH 001 . (Formerly Social Organization of Non-Western Societies.)



  
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    ANTH 012F - First-Year Seminar

    Semester Hours: 3
    Fall
    This course gives first-year students the opportunity to work in a seminar format with a member of the faculty in an area of the faculty member’s research interests.

    Prerequisite(s)/Course Notes:
    The course is open to first-year students only. Topics vary by semester. Consult the class schedule for proper category listing. Students may take only one 12F or 12S seminar.



  
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    ANTH 012S - First-Year Seminar

    Semester Hours: 1-3
    Spring
    This course gives first-year students the opportunity to work in a seminar format with a member of the faculty in an area of the faculty member’s research interests.

    Prerequisite(s)/Course Notes:
    The course is open to first-year students only. Topics vary by semester. Students may take only one 12F or 12S seminar.



  
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    ANTH 014F - First-Year Seminar

    Semester Hours: 3-4
    Fall
    This course gives first-year students the opportunity to work in a seminar format with a member of the faculty in an area of the faculty member’s research interests.

    Prerequisite(s)/Course Notes:
    The course is open to first-year students only. Topics vary by semester. Students may take only one 14F or 12F seminar and only one 14S or 12S seminar.



  
  •  

    ANTH 014S - First-Year Seminar

    Semester Hours: 3-4
    Spring
    This course gives first-year students the opportunity to work in a seminar format with a member of the faculty in an area of the faculty member’s research interests.

    Prerequisite(s)/Course Notes:
    The course is open to first-year students only. Topics vary by semester. Students may take only one 14F or 12F seminar and only one 14S or 12S seminar.



  
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    ANTH 032 - (BH, CC) Women and Development

    Semester Hours: 3
    Periodically
    Examination of the historical transformation of the roles of Asian and African women in relation to the different modes of socioeconomic organization of their respective societies. Critical assessment of the impact of social, religious, economic and political systems in defining the status of women in these societies.

    Prerequisite(s)/Course Notes:
    Same as AFST 032 . Credit given for this course or SOC 032 , not both.



  
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    ANTH 033 - Archaeological Field Methods

    Semester Hours: 3-6
    January, Summer
    An intensive hands-on introduction to the ideas, techniques, and methods used in archaeological field research. Students will participate in an archaeological excavation and be trained in the foundations of archaeological field testing and analysis. Students will learn the history of excavation techniques and theories, and receive a practical introduction to the development of archaeological research questions and the field and laboratory strategies used to answer these in fieldwork and analysis.

    Prerequisite(s)/Course Notes:
    Permission of instructor required. If the course is given during the January session, it will be offered for 3 s.h.; if the course is offered during the summer session, it will be offered for 3 or 6 s.h. depending on site access.



  
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    ANTH 099A - Significant Contributors to Anthropological Theory and Practice

    Semester Hours: 1
    Periodically
    A study of the contribution of one important anthropologist such as Franz Boaz, Margaret Mead, Ruth Benedict, Alfred Kroeber, Julian Steward, etc., for a total of 15 hours.



  
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    ANTH 099B - Significant Contributors to Anthropological Theory and Practice

    Semester Hours: 1
    Periodically
    A study of the contribution of one important anthropologist such as Franz Boaz, Margaret Mead, Ruth Benedict, Alfred Kroeber, Julian Steward, etc., for a total of 15 hours.



  
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    ANTH 099C - Significant Contributors to Anthropological Theory and Practice

    Semester Hours: 1
    Periodically
    A study of the contribution of one important anthropologist such as Franz Boaz, Margaret Mead, Ruth Benedict, Alfred Kroeber, Julian Steward, etc., for a total of 15 hours.



  
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    ANTH 100 - Departmental Honors Candidacy: Essay

    Semester Hours: 3
    Fall, Spring
    The research and the writing of a substantial essay in the field of anthropology. Open only to senior anthropology majors who are eligible for and desire to graduate with departmental honors. Interested students must secure, before registration, written permission of the instructor who will supervise the essay.



  
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    ANTH 101 - (BH) The Native Americans

    Semester Hours: 3
    Periodically
    Native America once comprised one of the most diverse cultural areas in the world. This course explores the relation between Native Americans and the U.S. from the beginning of colonization, through the battle of Little Big Horn, to the image of Native Americans in the media and the contemporary problems faced by indigenous minorities today.



  
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    ANTH 102 - (BH) African Cultures

    Semester Hours: 3
    Every Other Year
    The continent of Africa is the birthplace of humanity and an area of enormous cultural diversity. This course will examine representative contemporary African societies against a backdrop of social, political and economic change.

    Prerequisite(s)/Course Notes:
    Same as AFST 102 . (Formerly Peoples and Cultures of Africa.)



  
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    ANTH 103 - (BH) Peoples and Cultures of Asia

    Semester Hours: 3
    Periodically
    This survey course will focus in any year on selected anthropological studies for two or three of the following areas: China, Japan, India, mainland Southeast Asia and Indonesia.



  
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    ANTH 105 - (BH) Latin American Cultures

    Semester Hours: 3
    Every other year
    The course focuses on the relations between Latin American cultural expression and the social realities of Mexico, Central America and the Caribbean by exploring the indigenous, European (Iberian), and African origins of Latin American societies. Themes include: the history of European colonization of the Americas; race and class relations in Latin America; traditional and modern forms of cultural expression in the arts, literature, and film and their relation to Latin American culture.

    Prerequisite(s)/Course Notes:
    (Formerly Peoples and Cultures of Latin America.)



  
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    ANTH 106 - (CC) Peoples and Cultures of the Middle East and North Africa

    Semester Hours: 3
    Once a Year
    Survey of the region’s cultural diversity in historical context. Focus on the impact of Islam, traditional lifestyles and the reaction to colonialization by the West. Emphasis placed on case studies from Egypt, Yemen, the Gulf States, Iraq, Iran and Israel. Critical discussion of the role of anthropology in studying the Middle East. Attention also given to the social context of contemporary issues, such as Islamic fundamentalism, gender roles and recent armed conflicts.



  
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    ANTH 107 - (BH, CC) Conservation and Indigenous Peoples

    Semester Hours: 3
    Periodically

    Anthropological contributions to the understanding of indigenous rights, sustainable development, technology and biodiversity issues. The focus is on “indigenous peoples”– those societies in place before contact with Western Civilization or missionaries and their current status. 

    Prerequisite(s)/Course Notes:
    (Formerly Development, Conservation and Indigenous PeoplesDevelopment, Conservation, and Indigenous Peoples in Applied Anthropology.)



  
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    ANTH 108 - (BH) Afro-American Culture

    Semester Hours: 3
    Every other year
    Consideration and analysis of the culture of black Americans and black communities; emphasis is on enculturation processes and social forms resulting from antecedents of African culture and pressures from the dominant American culture. Emphasis is on the legacy of slavery.

    Prerequisite(s)/Course Notes:
    Same as AFST 108 .



  
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    ANTH 110 - (BH) Prehistory

    Semester Hours: 3
    Periodically

    Discussion of prehistoric hunting and gathering sites, early agricultural societies, royal burials, and ancient urban settings. Examination of archaeological data, research methods, dating techniques, artifact analysis, and problems of interpretation.

    Prerequisite(s)/Course Notes:
    None



  
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    ANTH 111 - (BH, CC) Culture and Music

    Semester Hours: 3
    Periodically
    This course uses historical and descriptive approaches to examine various ways people practice and perform music. Using the concept of “soundscape,” and drawing on audio, visual, and live performances (e.g., Mohegan drummers, Scottish fiddle players, etc.), we explore the cultural significance of sound in a number of indigenous societies in Asia, Australia, and Africa, as well as music genres found in the contemporary United States (e.g., Calypso, Mento, Ska, Blue Grass). This class also considers issues concerning the cultural theory of music change, and the ways various styles and genres (e.g., JuJu, Zouk, High Life, hip-hop) are reinvented cross-culturally.

    Prerequisite(s)/Course Notes:
    (Formerly Anthropology and Music.)



 

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