Feb 08, 2023  
2020-2021 Undergraduate Bulletin 
    
2020-2021 Undergraduate Bulletin [ARCHIVED BULLETIN]

Course Descriptions


 

Fine Arts (FA)

  
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    FA 070 - Metals I

    Semester Hours: 3
    Fall, Spring
    An introductory course in the basic techniques of metalsmithing. Students build fundamental skills in a series of short assignments. Techniques covered will be sawing, fabricating, forming, soldering and raising. Aesthetic considerations are also stressed. 

    Prerequisite(s)/Course Notes:
    Lab fee additional.



  
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    FA 071 - Furniture Design/ID3

    Semester Hours: 3
    Fall, Spring
    This course explores the structural, material, ergonomic and aesthetic considerations involved in design. Students will use traditional and contemporary techniques with the application to studio design projects.

    Prerequisite(s)/Course Notes:
    Lab fee additional. (Formerly Furniture Design (ID3).)



  
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    FA 073 - Current Gallery Developments

    Semester Hours: 1
    Periodically
    Study and analysis of contemporary developments. Students are required to spend 45 hours in museum and gallery visits.

    Prerequisite(s)/Course Notes:
    Open to fine arts majors and others with permission of instructor.



  
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    FA 080 - (CP) Beginning Ceramics

    Semester Hours: 3
    Fall, Spring
    Study of ancient, classic and contemporary ceramics, with emphasis on hands on creative interpretation and design by the student.

    Prerequisite(s)/Course Notes:
    Lab fee additional.



  
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    FA 080A - Intermediate Ceramics

    Semester Hours: 3
    Fall, Spring
    Continuation of 080  with emphasis on further development of techniques as well as increased fluency with the language of ancient, classic and contemporary ceramics.

    Prerequisite(s)/Course Notes:
    FA 080  or 081 . Lab fee additional.



  
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    FA 081 - Ceramic Materials and Techniques

    Semester Hours: 3
    Periodically
    Study of the physical and chemical properties of clay and glaze including their transformation by firing. Research and experimentation with clays, glazes, and kilns of various cultures, past and present. Exploration of aesthetic, formal and technical implications of ceramic materials and firing techniques.

    Prerequisite(s)/Course Notes:
    Lab fee additional.



  
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    FA 082 - (CP) Ceramic Sculpture

    Semester Hours: 3
    Once a Year
    Exploration of sculpture using the medium of clay. Emphasis on creative work. Slide lectures, research into contemporary ceramic sculpture, short papers on artists and techniques.

    Prerequisite(s)/Course Notes:
    FA 080 . Lab fee additional.



  
  
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    FA 100 - Departmental Honors Candidacy: Project

    Semester Hours: 3
    Fall, Spring
    The research for and the writing of a substantial essay in the field of fine arts or the execution and presentation of a creative project in an acceptable media.

    Prerequisite(s)/Course Notes:
    Open only to senior fine arts majors (those who have achieved better than a 3.4 cumulative average and 3.5 departmental average) who desire to graduate with departmental honors and who secure, before registration, written permission of the instructor who will supervise the project. FA 100 may be substituted for 199 by those who meet the above qualifications.



  
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    FA 102A - Introduction to New Media Design

    Semester Hours: 3-4
    Fall
    This course introduces students to the planning, design and production skills necessary to conceive and produce website, motion graphics, sound design and social media. All students create an online web-based portfolio and a professional blog. This course includes lecture(s) from guest speaker(s) from the design, media, art, marketing, public relations and advertising professions, and assistance with internships and career planning in the creative professions.

    Prerequisite(s)/Course Notes:
    Lab fee additional. (Formerly New Media Design I.)



  
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    FA 102B - Social Media and Web Design

    Semester Hours: 3
    Spring
    This course covers the research, planning, techniques and aesthetics of social and web media design. Using image manipulation and layout and animation software, students learn to conceive, develop and design social media and websites for creative and applied purposes. Students are given the opportunity for individual experimentation with the design and content developed during the course and are encouraged to develop a personal style. There are assignments, critiques and discussions on designers and technological issues. All students create an online web-based portfolio and a professional blog. This course includes lecture(s) from guest speaker(s) from the design, media, art, marketing, public relations and advertising professions and assistance with internships and career planning in the creative professions.

    Prerequisite(s)/Course Notes:
    Lab fee additional. (Formerly New Media II, Intermediate Web Design.)



  
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    FA 102C - Motion Graphics and Sound Design for Digital Media

    Semester Hours: 3
    Fall
    Strategy design helps commercial and nonprofit organizations decide what to create and how to innovate. Motion graphics are the implementation of this strategy in order to portray an organization’s character on screen using visuals, sound, and temporal elements. Students learn the planning and production tools necessary for strategy design, motion graphics, and sound design, including research, creative exploration, treatments, storyboards, and software prototypes. All students create an online Web-based portfolio and a professional blog. This course includes lecture(s) from guest speaker(s) from the design, media, art, marketing, public relations, and advertising professions and assistance with internships and career planning in the creative professions.

    Prerequisite(s)/Course Notes:
    Lab fee additional. (Formerly New Media III, Intermediate Motion Graphics and Sound Design; New Media Design III, Intermediate Motion Graphics and Sound Design.)



  
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    FA 102D - Design for Smartphones and iPads

    Semester Hours: 3
    Spring
    Projects explore the design, planning and research of the content, graphics and interfaces for mobile devices such as smartphones and iPads for business, entertainment, social action and communications. Students create self-designed projects for inclusion in a professional-level portfolio, preparing them for careers or graduate school. All students create an online web-based portfolio and a blog. This course includes lecture(s) from guest speaker(s) from the design, media, art, marketing, public relations and advertising professions, and assistance with internships and career planning in the creative professions.

    Prerequisite(s)/Course Notes:
    Lab fee additional. (Formerly New Media IV: Advanced Screen-based Design Projects.)



  
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    FA 106 - Special Projects

    Semester Hours: 1-3
    Fall, Spring
    Independent study in two and three-dimensional forms. Projects vary from year to year. Permission of department chairperson.

    Prerequisite(s)/Course Notes:
    Limited to fine arts majors.



  
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    FA 120 - Furniture Design – Wood

    Semester Hours: 3
    Fall, Spring
    A continued study and application of various techniques and theories of 3-D design. Emphasis will be on the material of solid wood, and sustainable design. Explore the creative process, develop critical thinking skills, challenge limits, and produce successful design in a series of hands-on assignments.

    Prerequisite(s)/Course Notes:
    FA 071 . Lab fee additional. (Formerly 3-D Design/ID 4.)



  
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    FA 121 - Furniture Design – Metal

    Semester Hours: 3
    Fall, Spring
    A continued study and application of various techniques and theories of 3-D design. Emphasis will be on metals: (e.g., steel, aluminum and others). Explore the creative process, develop critical thinking skills, challenge limits, and produce successful design in a series of hand-on assignments.

    Prerequisite(s)/Course Notes:
    Lab fee additional. (Formerly 3-D Design/ID 5.)



  
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    FA 122 - Metalsmithing-Raising

    Semester Hours: 3
    Fall, Spring
    Fundamental design and techniques of hollow ware: raising, forming and planishing spouts, handles, bodies and box forms, hinging. The aesthetic merit of each student’s work is an intrinsic component in its evaluation.

    Prerequisite(s)/Course Notes:
    FA 070  or permission of instructor. Lab fee additional.



  
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    FA 123 - Metalsmithing-Jewelry

    Semester Hours: 3
    Fall, Spring
    Design and techniques including filigree work, advanced surface treatments, engraving, enameling, stone, wood or metal inlay. The aesthetic merit of each student’s work is an intrinsic component in its evaluation.

    Prerequisite(s)/Course Notes:
    FA 120  or permission of instructor. Lab fee additional.



  
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    FA 158 - E-Publication Design

    Semester Hours: 3
    Fall
    Comprehensive design projects exploring specific areas of publication, utilizing digital publishing software design. Projects include design research and presentation. Internships are encouraged in this and all further graphic design courses.

    Prerequisite(s)/Course Notes:
    Lab fee additional. (Formerly Graphic Design III; Communication Design III.)



  
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    FA 159G - Packaging, Branding, Dimensional Design

    Semester Hours: 3
    Spring
    Further comprehensive design projects exploring specific area of design, including packaging, branding, industrial design, design research and presentation. Internships inside and outside the University are encouraged in this and all further graphic design courses.

    Prerequisite(s)/Course Notes:
    Lab fee additional. (Formerly Graphic Design IV, Communication Design IV.)



  
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    FA 160 - Painting III

    Semester Hours: 3


    Fall, Spring
    A continuation of FA 046 . A studio course to provide advanced students with the means to express their own ideas in the most suitable painting medium.

    Prerequisite(s)/Course Notes:
    FA 045 , 046 . (Formerly Painting Workshop I.)

     



  
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    FA 161 - (CP) Sculpture Studio—Sustainability in Art

    Semester Hours: 3
    Fall, Spring
    This course will focus on new developments in earth art.

    Prerequisite(s)/Course Notes:
    Lab fee additional. (Formerly Sculpture Studio IV.)



  
  
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    FA 167 - (CP) Sculpture Studio—Sustainability in Art II

    Semester Hours: 3
    Fall, Spring
    This course will focus on new developments in studio social sculpture.

    Prerequisite(s)/Course Notes:
    Lab fee additional. (Formerly Sculpture V: Advanced Modeling.)



  
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    FA 170 - (CP) Basic Black and White Film Photography: Developing/Darkroom Printing

    Semester Hours: 3
    Fall, Spring 
    Billions of digital images are made every year, but it all begins here with black-and-white film, an effective means of  image-making in the 21st century. Students will learn the fundamentals of 35mm film cameras and darkroom practice. This course offers a solid foundation in the technical and aesthetic vocabulary applicable to all forms of photography. Time in the darkroom also offers an appreciation for the simple beauty of the hand-made b&w print. A deeper understanding of light, metering, lenses, framing  and capturing the moment, will allow students to create, not just take pictures. Assignments, critiques, visual presentations. Students must have an adjustable 35mm film camera capable of manual controls. Must purchase photographic supplies.

    Prerequisite(s)/Course Notes:
    Lab fee additional. (Formerly Basic Photography.)



  
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    FA 170A - Intermediate Photography

    Semester Hours: 3
    Fall, Spring
    Focus on advanced techniques and aesthetics of black-and-white darkroom printing using 11”x14” fiber paper. Students gain a deeper and more expansive understanding of what a photograph can be. Discussions of contemporary photography and photographic ideas. Great opportunity for experimentation with technique, form and content. Students are encouraged to develop their own personal vision. In the latter part of the semester students may also use digital technology in their work: scanning negatives, shooting and/or printing digitally. Classwork will include assignments, critiques of student work, and discussions of historical/contemporary photographers and issues.

    Prerequisite(s)/Course Notes:
    FA 170  or permission of instructor. Lab fee additional.



  
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    FA 170B - Commercial Photography

    Semester Hours: 3
    Spring
    Introduction to commercial photography. Students will learn how to photograph in the fields of fashion, product, beauty and advertising. Studio and location work with emphasis on problem-solving skills. Lectures, lighting demonstrations, exercises and assignments. The assignments will be posted to the student’s own social media page. 

    Prerequisite(s)/Course Notes:
    FA 170G , 170C , 170A , or permission of the instructor. Digital camera required; knowledge of Adobe Photoshop and studio lighting. Lab fee additional. (Formerly Advanced Photography.)



  
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    FA 170C - (CP) Introduction to Digital Photography

    Semester Hours: 3
    Fall
    This is an introductory-level course to the aesthetics and techniques of digital photography. This course will cover the basics of digital cameras including shutter, F-stops and depth of field, metering, etc. It is also an introduction to Adobe Photoshop and digital printing. Students will shoot using digital cameras, manipulate their imagery in Photoshop and make inkjet prints in the computer lab. Course includes weekly assignments, class critiques and lectures. Students should have access to a digital camera with F-stop and shutter controls.

    Prerequisite(s)/Course Notes:
     Lab fee additional.



  
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    FA 170D - Intermediate Digital Photography

    Semester Hours: 3
    Fall, Spring
    As photography continues to evolve, new artistic and career opportunities come to light. Students will dig deeper into Photoshop and be better able to adapt their work to the ever-changing markets for photography.  Novel approaches such as animated GIFs and new takes on traditional methods will be addressed. Online presentation, large-scale printing and book production will be explored and applied to documentary and artistic projects. Students will work towards developing a personal style.

    Prerequisite(s)/Course Notes:
    FA 170C  or permission of instructor. Lab fee additional.



  
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    FA 170E - Documentary Photography

    Semester Hours: 3
    Every Other Spring
    Through assignments and extended projects, students learn to become keen observers, to find and visually convey the stories and meaning of people’s everyday lives. Digital, film and cell phone cameras may be used for capture; both print and digital methods will be used to present work. Class critiques, presentations of historical and contemporary documentary photography, readings, and class discussions provide opportunities for advancement and refinement of each student’s practice. 

    Prerequisite(s)/Course Notes:
    FA 170  or 170C ; knowledge of Photoshop helpful or permission of the instructor. Lab fee additional.



  
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    FA 170F - Color Photography

    Semester Hours: 3
    Fall
    This course is an introduction to color photography; students learn how to fine-tune their ability to see and print in color. Students will shoot with color negatives and create prints in the darkroom using color enlargers. Elements of digital color will be introduced. Discussions on historical and contemporary color photography help students in their assignments. In addition to class discussion and labs, there is a museum or gallery visit.

    Prerequisite(s)/Course Notes:
    FA 170 . Lab fee additional. (Formerly Color Printing from Color Negatives.)



  
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    FA 170G - The Portrait-Studio Photography I

    Semester Hours: 3
    Fall
    Introduction to studio photography and portraiture. Students learn how to light with strobe lights and photograph people using basic principles and techniques of lighting. A variety of approaches are explored from traditional to experimental. Assortment of studio tools; students can choose digital or film, color or black-and-white, as they like. Access to studio seven days a week. Assignments given, as well as freedom to pursue individual ideas. Class critique of student work; visual presentations from historical / contemporary portraiture. Digital camera recommended. 

    Prerequisite(s)/Course Notes:
    FA 170A  or 170C ; familiarity with Photoshop helpful; students should have 6 s.h. in photography or permission of the instructor. Not recommended for first-year students. Lab fee additional.



  
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    FA 170H - Large Format Camera - Studio Photography II

    Semester Hours: 3
    Every other Spring
    This is a large format photography class using the 4”x5” studio view camera.  Building on the lighting techniques learned in 170G , we begin with portraits and then concentrate on still life. Exploration of creative and technical problem-solving using fine art and commercial applications.  Production of black and white and color imagery.  Students may also shoot landscape using traveling 4”x5” field cameras.   Access to studio; assignments, class critiques, film and other visual presentations.

    Prerequisite(s)/Course Notes:
    FA 170G  or permission of the instructor. Lab fee additional.



  
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    FA 170J - Alternative Photographic Processes

    Semester Hours: 3
    Spring
    Alternative photographic processes is a hands-on exploration of early and unusual photographic methods, married with contemporary digital capture and output. Processes include pinhole photography, darkroom printing, digitally enlarged negatives, inkjet printing, and a variety of hand-applied light-sensitive emulsions on fine art paper. The mastery of technique is emphasized alongside individual creativity and self-expression. Classes include lectures on historical and contemporary work, class discussion, and critique.

    Prerequisite(s)/Course Notes:
    FA 170  or 170C ; familiar with Photoshop helpful. Permission of the instructor. Lab fee additional. (Formerly 171.)



  
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    FA 172 - Relief Printing

    Semester Hours: 3
    Fall, Spring
    This course will introduce the basic tools and aesthetics of relief printing, a process of transferring ink from a raised surface. Using water-based inks we will create works using cardboard, linoleum and wood. The historical significance of this area of the print will be discussed and investigated. A visit to a museum/printshop/or artist studio will be made in coordination with the studio portion of this course.



  
  
  
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    FA 181 A-Z - Special Topics in Fine Arts and Design

    Semester Hours: 1-3
    Periodically
    Subject and content vary from year to year.

    Prerequisite(s)/Course Notes:
    Course may be repeated when topics vary and students may register for multiple courses within this numbering scheme. As individual subjects are selected, each is assigned a letter (A-Z) which is affixed to the course number. Specific titles and course descriptions for special topics courses are available in the online class scheduleWSC 001 , 002  or equivalent.



  
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    FA 197 - Internship in Fine Arts

    Semester Hours: 1-3
    Periodically
    Fine arts majors are encouraged to find work in arts-related businesses and institutions to develop their skills and gain professional experience.

    Prerequisite(s)/Course Notes:
    A minimum GPA of at least 3.0 and permission of the department chairperson are required for student eligibility for participation in internship courses. A preliminary interview will be held with the student and the department chairperson or faculty adviser to establish the nature of the academic work associated with on-site work of the internship. A minimum of 28 hours of on-site work per semester hour of credit is required, accompanied by a minimum of 10 hours of academic work per semester hour of credit — for example, reading, research, and a term paper or final project, to be determined by faculty adviser in conjunction with student. Final grade will be based on both academic and on-site performance. An on-site evaluation of “poor” will result in a final grade no higher than C. May be repeated once for credit.



  
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    FA 198 - New York Seminar

    Semester Hours: 3
    Periodically
    Examination of the development of contemporary art in New York from 1945 to the present with emphasis on the past 10 years. Classes meet at Hofstra and at museums, galleries, artists’ studios and other locations where major traditional and transitional trends may be studied. Two formal essays and seminar attendance are required.



  
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    FA 199 - Senior Project

    Semester Hours: 3
    Fall, Spring
    Individual supervised research project in student’s major area including seminar analyses. Project is to be chosen with the approval of the instructor.

    Prerequisite(s)/Course Notes:
    May be repeated once for credit, under special circumstances, with approval of the chairperson. Registration is limited to approved fine arts majors.




Food Studies (FST)

  
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    FST 001 - (IS) Food Studies

    Semester Hours: 3-4


    Once a Year

    This course introduces students to the emerging world of food studies. Students will critically examine food and eating from a variety of perspectives.  Students will study foodways across cultures and across historical periods; representations of food; culinary traditions; current controversies and food-based social movements.  The course uses perspectives from anthropology, biology, economics, global studies, sustainability studies, history, journalism, nutrition, philosophy, and sociology to develop an interdisciplinary approach to the study of food.



  
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    FST 005 A-Z - Special Topics in Food Studies

    Semester Hours: 1-3


    This course explores innovative and timely topics in food studies, which may include the cultural history of different foods, food movements, and political and social issues surrounding food.

    Current Special Topics

    FST 005A: Food and Media

    In today’s media-saturated world, media plays a critical role in our perception of food and its impact on our lives. Through the exploration of the relationship between food and media (print, radio, television, film and social media), this course encompasses both critical and creative opportunities for students to delve into the deconstruction, evaluation, and creation of food media messages.

    FST 005B: Caffeine Culture: Literature and Food

    Imagine tasting something that has the power not only to enthrall your senses but also to change your conceptualization of your own cultural identity.  Writers who have sought to capture transformative experiences like these in their short stories, novels, and essays give expression in their work to broader cultural and historical shifts.  As we read their work through an interdisciplinary lens in this course, the fictional worlds that they create take on new dimensions.  Impressionable or curious children and young adults often play the central roles in these fictional worlds, as do three principal products–coffee, tea, and sugar—that represent contrasts between self-discipline and overindulgence, as well as between comfort and deprivation.  In turn, familiar as coffee, tea, and sugar may seem to be, the stimulating effects produced by mixing caffeine and sugar became part of the cultural rituals practiced in the West only when the modern world took shape and global trading networks were established, giving rise to new spaces of social interaction such as coffeehouses.  Other texts in our course track imported food products like these back to their places of origin, to give voice to those who labor to cultivate these products, or in support of movements advocating for political reform and social justice.  Our reading list will be comprised of literary texts, such as Jonathan Swift’s A Modest Proposal, Lewis Carroll’s Alice’s Adventures in Wonderland, Christina Rossetti’s “Goblin Market,” George Orwell’s Animal Farm, and Joan Lindsay’s Picnic at Hanging Rock, and selected chapters from Stanley Mintz’s Sweetness and Power; Tom Standage’s A History of the World in Six Glasses; and Andrea Stuart’s Sugar in the Blood: A Family’s Story of Slavery and Empire. 



  
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    FST 150 - (IS) Independent Readings in Food Studies

    Semester Hours: 1-3


    Fall, January, Spring, Summer

    Individualized readings course to permit the student to pursue topics of special interest.  Students will prepare oral and written reports based upon their readings.

    Prerequisite(s)/Course Notes:
    Open to students who have completed 9 semester hours of course work in Food Studies or with permission of program director.  May be repeated for credit when topics vary.



  
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    FST 190 - (IS) Practicum in Food Studies

    Semester Hours: 1-3


    Fall, January, Spring, Summer

    Observe, shadow and document professionals in an approved food studies organization. Students will be supervised by program faculty and on-site staff organization, and will meet coursework expectations as agreed upon with supervising faculty member. Alternatively, students may propose an independent project related to an approved food studies organization.

    Prerequisite(s)/Course Notes:
    9 s.h. of course work in Food Studies minor.  This course can be repeated twice for credit.




Forensic Science (FOR)

  
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    FOR 012F - First-Year Seminar

    Semester Hours: 3
    Fall
    This course gives first-year students the opportunity to work in a seminar format with a member of the faculty in an area of the faculty member’s research interests.

    Prerequisite(s)/Course Notes:
    The course is open to first-year students only. Topics vary by semester. Consult the class schedule for proper category listing. Students may take only one 12F or 12S seminar.



  
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    FOR 012S - First-Year Seminar

    Semester Hours: 1-3
    This course gives first-year students the opportunity to work in a seminar format with a member of the faculty in an area of the faculty member’s research interests.
     

    Prerequisite(s)/Course Notes:
    The course is open to first-year students only. Topics vary by semester. Students may take only one 12F or 12S seminar.



  
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    FOR 014F - (NS) First-Year Seminar

    Semester Hours: 3-4
    Fall
    This course gives first-year students the opportunity to work in a seminar format with a member of the faculty in an area of the faculty member’s research interests.

    Prerequisite(s)/Course Notes:
    The course is open to first-year students only. Topics vary by semester. This course is offered for distribution credit; consult the Semester Planning Guide for proper category listing. Students may take only one 14F or 12F seminar and only one 14S or 12S seminar.



  
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    FOR 014S - (NS) First-Year Seminar

    Semester Hours: 3-4
    Spring
    This course gives first-year students the opportunity to work in a seminar format with a member of the faculty in an area of the faculty member’s research interests.

    Prerequisite(s)/Course Notes:
    The course is open to first-year students only. Topics vary by semester. This course is offered for distribution credit; consult the Semester Planning Guide for proper category listing. Students may take only one 14F or 12F seminar and only one 14S or 12S seminar.



  
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    FOR 100 - Survey in Forensic Science

    Semester Hours: 3
    This survey course in forensic science is intended for undergraduate students interested in investigative techniques. It is an integrated laboratory-lecture course that will introduce students to select topics in forensic science as well as some of the physical, chemical and instrumental methods used by detectives and forensic scientists to investigate evidence at the crime scene or in the laboratory. Lecture topics include identifying physical evidence, forensic investigative techniques, chemical and instrumental methods of analyzing evidence. Hands-on activities involving microscopic, spectroscopic, and noninstrumental methods of analysis will acquaint students with some of the fundamental techniques used in the evaluation and characterization of physical evidence. Students will also be introduced to forensic photography with emphasis on scientific documentation of physical evidence in the laboratory setting.

    Prerequisite(s)/Course Notes:
    CHEM 003A , 003B ; or permission of instructor. Lab fee additional.



  
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    FOR 101 - Crime Scene Investigation Methods

    Semester Hours: 3
    Spring
    This course introduces students to forensic techniques and technologies employed at the crime scene (non-laboratory settings). It is an integrated laboratory-lecture course that familiarizes students with the methods of collection, preservation and documentation of physical evidence. Topics include collecting and processing physical evidence, forensic investigative techniques, and physical methods of analysis. Additionally, forensic field techniques in mass-casualty investigations and bioterrorism will be discussed. Hands-on activities will include reconstruction of a crime scene, fingerprint detection and recovery, specialized photographic techniques, and the use of a ballistic alignment laser.

    Prerequisite(s)/Course Notes:
    CHEM 003A , 003B ; or permission of instructor. Lab fee additional.



  
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    FOR 110 - Forensic Science Seminar

    Semester Hours: 1
    Fall
    Students attend weekly seminars of case studies presented by either the course instructor or guest criminalists.  Presentations highlight actual criminal cases and familiarize students with the physical, chemical and instrumental strategies used by criminalists to investigate evidence at the crime scene and in the laboratory.  The critical role forensic science played in either the investigative or adjudicative aspects of the case is examined. 

    Prerequisite(s)/Course Notes:
    FOR 100 , 101 , or permission of instructor.



  
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    FOR 115 - Forensic Biotechnology

    Semester Hours: 3
    Every Other Fall

    Focusing on forensic DNA genotyping, students will develop basic knowledge of the biotechnology utilized in forensic analyses. The core concepts include DNA evidence retrieval, conservation and analysis with modern technology, and analytical instrumentation including DNA extraction, PCR and microchip electrophoresis. The last four weeks are reserved for hands-on experiment on serology, DNA extraction, quantification, seperation, and detection.

    Prerequisite(s)/Course Notes:
    CHEM 003A , 003B ; BIOL 113 ; or permission of instructor. Prerequisite or corequisite: CHEM 135 . No liberal arts credit. May not be taken on a Pass/D+/D/Fail basis. Lab fee additional.



  
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    FOR 120 - Forensic Microscopy

    Semester Hours: 4
    Spring
    This introductory course in forensic microscopy is intended for undergraduate students who are interested in acquiring the knowledge and skills in basic forensic science laboratory methodology and techniques. It is an integrated laboratory-lecture course that introduces students to polarized light and stereomicroscopy, and to the techniques and methods employed in the documentation, collection, examination, identification, individualization, and comparison of trace evidential materials. Topics include trace evidence collection, preparation techniques, polarized light microscopy theory and practice, stereomicroscopy theory and practice, as well as the established rationale and methodologies used by forensic scientists in the American Society of Crime Laboratory Directors (ASCLD) accredited laboratories. 

    Prerequisite(s)/Course Notes:
    FOR 100  or permission of instructor. No liberal arts credit. Lab fee additional.



  
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    FOR 130 - Methods in Trace Analysis

    Semester Hours: 4
    Spring
    Methods in trace analysis is an advanced course in forensic microscopy. It is an integrated laboratory-lecture course that provides students with advanced knowledge in polarized light microscopy theory, as well as in the use of the Grim III, and advanced microspectrometric techniques (FTIR, Raman, UV-Vis, X-ray fluorescence, X-ray diffraction) for the examination, identification, individualization and comparison of trace evidential materials. Topics include trace evidence instrumentation theory and practice, advanced polarized light microscopy theory and micro-techniques.

    Prerequisite(s)/Course Notes:
    CHEM 124 , 125 , 145 ; FOR 120 . No liberal arts credit. Lab fee additional.



  
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    FOR 140 - Evidence Photography for Forensic Applications

    Semester Hours: 3
    Periodically
    This course combines lectures, demonstrations and hands-on training in specialized crime lab photography techniques. The course familiarizes students with methods of visual documentation, evidence analysis and demonstrative aids in court. This is not an introductory course in photography; however, some review of camera functions, film selection, filter applications, and exposure determination is provided. Advanced topics will include copy and close-up photography, photomicrography, photomacrography, illumination techniques, ultraviolet, infrared and fluorescence photography.

    Prerequisite(s)/Course Notes:
    FA 170C ; FOR 101 ; or permission of instructor.  No liberal arts credit. Lab fee additional. (Formerly, Digital Imaging for Forensic Applications.)



  
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    FOR 150 - The Analysis and Pharmacology of Drugs of Abuse

    Semester Hours: 3
    Every Other Spring

    This course familiarizes students with analytical methods used to identify and characterize drugs of abuse. Current theories of drug action, fate in biological systems, and toxicities are presented. Neurobiological theories of drug addiction are also considered. The course focuses on both classical laboratory techniques and state-of-the-art instrumental methods for the identification of drugs of abuse. Additionally, techniques for extracting drug substances from biological fluids and current methods in post-mortem toxicological analysis are discussed. Historical and ethnobotanical aspects of each class of drugs, as well as the cultural origins of drug use, will be discussed. Ethical considerations in performing analyses and formulating opinions will be presented.

    Prerequisite(s)/Course Notes:
    BIOL 113 ; CHEM 135 137 ; or permission of instructor.



  
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    FOR 160 - Introduction to Firearm Identification and Ballistics

    Semester Hours: 3
    Fall, Spring
    This course prepares students in current laboratory techniques and analytical procedures used in the identification of firearms. While the course involves both practical training and classroom instruction, it is not a marksmanship course, and students will not be trained in the firing of weapons. The course highlights firearm safety, operability testing techniques, and scientific methodologies utilized in modern laboratories for identifying firearms. The primary focus of this course is the examination of the unique characteristics transferred from firearms to bullets and cartridge case evidence. Computerized ballistics and its relationship to criminal investigations are studied.

    Prerequisite(s)/Course Notes:
    FOR 100  or permission of instructor. No liberal arts credit.



  
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    FOR 165 - Questioned Documents

    Semester Hours: 3
    Fall, Spring
    This lecture course prepares students in current techniques in forensic document examination. It combines presentations with demonstrations and hands-on activities to introduce students to the scientific examination of handwriting, identification and individualization of prepared documents, determination of genuineness or spuriousness, and formulation of opinions and expert testimony. Unique characteristics transferred from individuals to documents are examined. The course highlights technical and scientific methodologies utilized in modern laboratories for analyzing documents.
     

    Prerequisite(s)/Course Notes:
    CHEM 003A , 003B ; FOR 101 ; PHYS 012A , 012B ; and permission of instructor. No liberal arts credit. Lab fees additional.



  
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    FOR 180 - Forensic Science Internship

    Semester Hours: 3
    Fall, January, Spring, Summer
    Students will spend a minimum of 200 hours, typically during the summer between their junior and senior years, in an approved forensic laboratory. The internship provides students with “real-life” experiences in the field of forensic science, and allows them to apply techniques learned in the classroom to actual criminal investigations. Internship opportunities are arranged and coordinated on an individual basis by the director of the forensic science program. The students’ grades will depend on written assignments and on their site supervisors’ evaluations. No credit toward the BS degree in forensic science  is awarded until FOR 180 is satisfactorily completed.

    Prerequisite(s)/Course Notes:
    BIO 011 ; CHEM 105 , 109 135 , 137 ; FOR 120 ; or permission of instructor. No liberal arts credit.



  
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    FOR 181 - Forensic Science Internship

    Semester Hours: 1-3


    Fall, January, Spring, Summer
    Having successfully completed the required FOR 180 internship, some students may want to gain additional hours in an approved forensic-science setting. These additional elective internship hours may provide students who were previously involved in a particular research project the opportunity to complete their previous work. Other students may want the opportunity to gain additional practical experience in the broad field of forensic science. Internship opportunities are arranged and coordinated on an individual basis by the director of the forensic science program. The students’ grades will depend on written assignments and on their site supervisors’ evaluations.

     

    Prerequisite(s)/Course Notes:
    BIO 011 ; CHEM 105 , 109 , 135 , 137 ; FOR 120 , 180 ; or permission of instructor. No liberal arts credit.



  
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    FOR 185 - Forensic Science Independent Study

    Semester Hours: 1-3
    Fall, Spring, Summer
    Students work under the direction of a faculty mentor on an experimental research project, a “cold” case, or a current criminal investigation. Grading is based on the case presentation or research paper.


    Prerequisite(s)/Course Notes:
    CHEM 105 , 109 , 135 , 137 ; FOR 120 , 180 ; or permission of instructor. No liberal arts credit.



  
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    FOR 190 - Legal Issues Pertaining to Scientific Evidence

    Semester Hours: 3
    Fall
    This course highlights the relationship between legal decision making and forensic science. Evidentiary foundations for types of forensic evidence are presented, and legal evaluation of scientific validity is discussed. Issues pertaining to chain of custody procedures; methods of forensic analysis; identification of individuals; and the relevance, materiality, credibility, and competence of the evidence are examined.

    Prerequisite(s)/Course Notes:
    FOR 100  or permission of instructor.



  
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    FOR 192 A-Z - Special Topics in Forensic Science

    Semester Hours: 1-3
    Periodically
    Specialized topics in forensic science not covered in other forensic science courses, such as arson and explosives, or forensic DNA analysis, are presented.

    Prerequisite(s)/Course Notes:
    FOR 100 , 101 , or permission of instructor. Minimum GPA of 2.0 required. May be repeated for credit when topics vary. May not be taken on a Pass/D+/D/Fail basis. No liberal arts credit. Lab fee may be applicable for certain topic offerings. Specific titles and course descriptions for special topics courses are available in the online class schedule.



  
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    FOR 195 - Forensic Expert Witness Testimony

    Semester Hours: 3
    Spring
    This is an interdisciplinary course taught by members of the law and forensics faculties at Hofstra. It is intended for undergraduate students majoring in criminology /forensic science . Students in FOR 195 will collaborate with law students enrolled in a class focusing on the use of expert witnesses to develop the skills necessary to conduct and participate in criminal cases that rely on forensic evidence to prove both the prosecution and defense theories of the case. Both law and forensic science students learn within the context of a simulation and are divided into prosecution-lawyer-expert and defense-lawyer-expert teams. 

    Prerequisite(s)/Course Notes:
    FOR 190 , RHET 007 , CHEM 105, CHEM 109, CHEM 124, CHEM 125, FOR 120, FOR 130 or permission of instructor. No liberal arts credit.



  
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    FOR 198 - Departmental Honors Candidacy: Research

    Semester Hours: 1-3
    Fall, Summer
    Capstone research project in forensic science for students with a minimum cumulative GPA of 3.4 and a minimum GPA of 3.5 chemistry course work. Students complete a research project including laboratory and library work (1 hour conference, 3 hours laboratory per credit) under the direction of a faculty member. Students are required to present research work orally for Departmental Honors, and complete a written report.

    Prerequisite(s)/Course Notes:
    Permission of instructor. Total research credits for 198-199 series must be at least 3 s.h. The number of s.h. are determined by the student and faculty member prior to registration. May not be taken on a Pass/D+/D/Fail basis. No liberal arts credit. Credit given to this course or FOR 183H, not both. (Formerly FOR183H, Honors Undergraduate Research)



  
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    FOR 199 - Departmental Honors Candidacy: Research

    Semester Hours: 1-3
    Spring, Summer
    Capstone research project in forensic science for students with a minimum cumulative GPA of 3.4 and a minimum GPA of 3.5 chemistry course work.  Students complete a research project including laboratory and library work (1 hour conference, 3 hours laboratory per credit) under the direction of a faculty member. Students are required to present research work orally for Departmental Honors, and complete a written report.

    Prerequisite(s)/Course Notes:
    Permission of instructor. Total research credits for 198-199 series must be at least 3 s.h. The number of s.h. are determined by the student and faculty member prior to registration. May not be taken on a Pass/D+/D/Fail basis. No liberal arts credit. Credit given to this course or FOR 184H, not both. (Formerly FOR 184H, Honors Undergraduate Research)




Foundations of Education (FDED)

  
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    FDED 110 - History of American Education

    Semester Hours: 3
    Every other year
    The development of schooling in the context of the history of American education. Includes the development of textbooks and curriculum, educational ideas and practices, and proposals for reform.



  
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    FDED 111 - The American School

    Semester Hours: 3
    Fall, Spring
    This course examines the school as an institution shaped by political, professional, economic, and social units. We examine these units as both distinct and intersecting elements that contribute to the social, philosophical, and historical lens. Hypotheses and analytical tools from a variety of the social sciences are employed as means of exposing and interpreting central features of the American public educational system.

    Prerequisite(s)/Course Notes:
    May be applied toward liberal arts credit.



  
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    FDED 114 - The Education of America’s Minority Groups

    Semester Hours: 3
    Periodically
    Analysis of the education afforded to minority groups, focusing on four major factors: (1) the response of the dominant American society to particular minority groups; (2) the educative milieu of the minority group including attention to family patterns, cultural values and the establishment of ethnic institutions; (3) the schooling provided to minority group members; and (4) the problem of intergroup education in the schools. The primary mode of inquiry will be through the several social and behavioral sciences.



  
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    FDED 127 - Introduction to Philosophy of Education

    Semester Hours: 3
    Fall, Spring
    Examination of the philosophic dimension of key educational ideas over time and exploration of the philosophical issues and assumptions involved in various classroom practices in the past and present.

    Prerequisite(s)/Course Notes:
    May be applied toward liberal arts credit. This is an introductory course in philosophy of education. Students with more than an introductory course in philosophy should consult a Foundation of Education adviser about substitutions.



  
  
  
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    FDED 175 to 179 A-Z - Workshops

    Semester Hours: 1-3
    Periodically
    Workshops are designed to focus on topics of special interest. As individual subjects are selected, each is assigned a letter (A-Z) and added to the course number.  Any course may be taken a number of times so long as there is a different letter designation each time it is taken.




French (FREN)

  
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    FREN 001 - Elementary French

    Semester Hours: 3
    Fall, Spring, Summer
    Fundamentals of structure, sound system and vocabulary building for effective communication: speaking, understanding, reading and writing techniques are introduced.



  
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    FREN 001A - Intensive Beginning French

    Semester Hours: 6
    Periodically
    Intensive exposure to the materials of the first year of language study is covered in one semester.

    Prerequisite(s)/Course Notes:
    Credit not given for both this course and 001  and/or 002 .



  
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    FREN 002 - Elementary French

    Semester Hours: 3
    Fall, Spring, Summer
    Sequel to FREN 001 . Continued development of the fundamentals of structure, sound system and vocabulary building for effective communication and understanding. Speaking, understanding, reading and writing techniques are further developed.

    Prerequisite(s)/Course Notes:
    FREN 001  or equivalent.



  
  
  •  

    FREN 003 - Intermediate French

    Semester Hours: 3
    Fall, Spring, Summer
    Continued development of the fundamentals of structure, sound system, vocabulary building for effective communication and understanding. Speaking, understanding, reading and writing techniques are further developed.

    Prerequisite(s)/Course Notes:
    FREN 002  or 002R  or equivalent.



  
  
  •  

    FREN 004 - Intermediate French

    Semester Hours: 3
    Fall, Spring, Summer
    Places emphasis on attaining an integrated performance in speaking, listening, reading and writing at a high intermediate level of proficiency. Students are able to handle communicative tasks successfully and to write several paragraphs on a variety of topics with reasonable accuracy.

    Prerequisite(s)/Course Notes:
    FREN 003  or equivalent.



  
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    FREN 006 - Advanced Reading Skills in French

    Semester Hours: 3
    Periodically
    Development of reading skills. While the foreign language, spoken and written, will be the basis of class work and written assignments, the course will aim at attaining the stage of liberated reading.

    Prerequisite(s)/Course Notes:
    FREN 004  or equivalent.



  
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    FREN 013 - Intermediate French Grammar

    Semester Hours: 1
    Periodically

    Five weeks of intensive work designed for students who have finished FREN 003  and want to take courses on the advanced French level. This mini-course prepares them to read and write more efficiently.

    Prerequisite(s)/Course Notes:
    FREN 004 - Intermediate French Completion of FREN 003 or higher; or equivalent placement score.



  
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    FREN 014 - Introductory Conversation

    Semester Hours: 1
    Periodically
    Five weeks of intensive work on oral expression for students who have finished FREN 004  and wish to develop the ability to communicate orally with increasing fluency before going on to advanced courses.

    Prerequisite(s)/Course Notes:
    FREN 004 . May be taken by itself or in conjunction with the other mini-courses 013 , 017 A-Z , 018 , and/or 006 . May not be taken with or after 109  or any other higher numbered course. Attendance is mandatory.



  
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    FREN 015 - Practical Translation

    Semester Hours: 1
    Periodically
    Intermediate translation skills, with exercises moving from French to English and from English to French. Structure of French and English is compared through translation exercises.

    Prerequisite(s)/Course Notes:
    FREN 004 . May be taken concurrently with other mini-courses and FREN 006 ; 013  is strongly recommended. May not be taken concurrently with or after FREN 160 .



  
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    FREN 016 - Readings in Business I

    Semester Hours: 3
    Fall
    Readings of French texts taken from standard business works and from contemporary business publications and materials. Concentration on the business terminology of France and Canada.

    Prerequisite(s)/Course Notes:
    FREN 006  or 111  or 112 , or permission of instructor.



  
  
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    FREN 017 A-Z - Aspects of French Culture

    Semester Hours: 1


    Periodically
    Detailed investigation of some aspect of contemporary French life (e.g., film, music, television, comics, newspaper, architecture, etc.). Emphasis on spoken and written expression.

    Current Special Topics

    FREN 017G: Aspects of French Culture: Surrealism

    The nature of surrealism and its manifestations in film, theater, poetry, and the pictorial arts then and today. 

    Prerequisite(s)/Course Notes:
    FREN 004 . May be repeated for credit when topics vary. As individual subjects are selected, each is assigned a letter (A-Z) which is affixed to the course number. Specific titles and course descriptions for special topics courses are available in the online class schedule. (Formerly FREN 017.)



  
  
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    FREN 019 - History of the French Language

    Semester Hours: 1
    Periodically
    A five-week intensive course in French philology. Emphasis on the development of the French vowel and verb system. Previous study of Latin is helpful.

    Prerequisite(s)/Course Notes:
    Intermediate or advanced French phonetics; FREN 111 , 114  or permission.



  
  
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    FREN 107 - Individualized French Aural-Oral Development

    Semester Hours: 0.5
    Fall, Spring
    Stresses authentic intonation patterns, oral proficiency and listening comprehension. Students meet on an individual basis once a week for twenty-five minutes with a native French-speaking instructor. These sessions are augmented by language laboratory and off-campus experiences.

    Prerequisite(s)/Course Notes:
    FREN 002  or equivalent. Note: May not be used to satisfy the foreign language requirement; course may be repeated; a total of 3 s.h. may be applied toward the BA degree. No credit toward French major . P/F grade only.



  
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    FREN 109 - Conversational French

    Semester Hours: 3
    Periodically
    The student will develop ability to organize ideas, feelings, concepts and impart information through oral French. Topics for discussion chosen by students and instructor will be based upon appropriate classic and current materials. Direct experiences such as field trips and movies will be encouraged. Attendance is mandatory.

    Prerequisite(s)/Course Notes:
    FREN 004 .



  
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    FREN 110 - Advanced Conversation

    Semester Hours: 3
    Summer
    Designed to develop ability to communicate in the French manner. Topics for discussion range from the literary to the sociological, from the cultural and aesthetic to the personal. Background readings may be classical or contemporary. Field trips are encouraged. Attendance is mandatory.



  
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    FREN 111 - Advanced French Grammar

    Semester Hours: 3
    Fall, Spring
    Thorough review and refinement of the student’s knowledge of French grammar and structure. Systematic exercises, compositions and illustrative analysis of reading passages.



  
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    FREN 112 - French Composition

    Semester Hours: 3
    Spring
    Designed to improve the student’s ability to write correct French. Stylistic and linguistic studies of selected texts. Exercises in French composition, outside readings.



  
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    FREN 113 - French Civilization

    Semester Hours: 3
    Spring
    A survey of French culture through its arts and letters, scientific contributions and the development of its political and social institutions. Extensive use of audio-visual materials.



  
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    FREN 114 - Introduction to French Literature I

    Semester Hours: 3
    Fall, Spring
    Designed to foster literary appreciation through the analysis of texts from the Chanson de Roland through Corneille’s Cid. Introduction to the basic vocabulary of literary analysis and to the French technique of “explication de texte.”

    Prerequisite(s)/Course Notes:
    FREN 004 .



  
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    FREN 120 - Provence Today

    Semester Hours: 3
    Summer
    Participation in the life of Provence through contact with artists, artisans, professionals, etc., as well as museums, cultural events and historical sites. Preparatory sessions and followup meetings to help students evaluate their experience.

    Prerequisite(s)/Course Notes:
    FREN 004  or permission. Given as part of the Summer in France Program.



  
 

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