Feb 08, 2023  
2020-2021 Undergraduate Bulletin 
    
2020-2021 Undergraduate Bulletin [ARCHIVED BULLETIN]

Course Descriptions


 

French (FREN)

  
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    FREN 122 - (LT, CC) The Francophone Experience in North Africa

    Semester Hours: 3
    Periodically
    An introduction to Algerian, Moroccan and Tunisian cultures from the colonial era to post-colonialism through an analysis of literature and film.

    Prerequisite(s)/Course Notes:
    FREN 004 . Same as AFST 124 .



  
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    FREN 123 - The Francophone Experience in the Caribbean

    Semester Hours: 3
    Periodically
    An introduction to Caribbean cultures from the colonial era to post-colonialism through an analysis of literature and film.

    Prerequisite(s)/Course Notes:
    FREN 111  or 113 .



  
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    FREN 124 - Culture et Littérature Québécoises (Culture and Literature of Quebec)

    Semester Hours: 3
    Periodically
    Students of French become familiar with the basic components of Québécois culture and literature through a study of its history, geography, and examples of its literary tradition. Discovery of the political, cultural, and social aspects of the language issue so much a part of Québécois life.

    Prerequisite(s)/Course Notes:
    FREN 004 .



  
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    FREN 125 - (CC, LT) East Asia Through the French and Francophone Perspectives

    Semester Hours: 3
    Periodically
    An introduction to Asian cultures of the French-speaking world from the colonial era to post-colonialism through an analysis of literature. Students will obtain an appreciation for the rich heritage of the French-speaking world in Asia. They will all become aware of the distinctiveness of cultural identities in East Asia and the Asian Diaspora in the context of the historical struggle with French colonial and national influences.

    Prerequisite(s)/Course Notes:
    FREN 006 , 111 , 112  or 113 . May not be taken on a Pass/D+/D/Fail basis.



  
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    FREN 142 - Readings in French

    Semester Hours: 1-3
    Fall, Spring
    Individualized reading courses to permit the student to pursue topic of special interest.

    Prerequisite(s)/Course Notes:
    Permission of department chairperson. May not be taken on a Pass/D+/D/Fail basis.



  
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    FREN 150 - Internship in French

    Semester Hours: 1-6
    Periodically
    French majors or minors who have been offered an internship may receive credit through this course if approved by the chairperson of the Department of Romance Languages and Literatures . The internship must be in a field in which a major  or a minor  in French would be considered beneficial. Students are encouraged to find internships in social, justice and not-for-profit groups, as well as in for-profit organizations.

    Prerequisite(s)/Course Notes:
    A minimum GPA of 3.0 or approval of the department chairperson is required for student eligibility for participation in internship courses. May be repeated for up to 6 s.h.; only 3 s.h. of FREN 150 may be applied toward a minor in French; 6 s.h. may be applied toward a major  in French. May not be taken on Pass/D+/D/Fail basis. A minimum of 28 hours of on-site work per semester hour is required, in addition to a minimum of 10 hours of academic work – for example, reading, research, and a term paper or final project, to be determined by faculty adviser in conjunction with student. There will be a minimum of three meetings with the faculty adviser (one at the beginning of the internship, one around mid-term, and one at the end of the internship experience); at the last meeting, students report their on-site work and its relevance to their field of study in French. Grade will be based on both academic and on-site performance. An on-site evaluation of “poor” will result in a final grade no higher than C.



  
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    FREN 151 - (LT) Satire in Various Genres

    Semester Hours: 3
    Periodically
    Study of satire attempts to determine how satirical expression in diverse works of the modern period differs from that in the earlier period. Focuses on differences as may occur in such texts by Voltaire and those by Ionesco.

    Prerequisite(s)/Course Notes:
    FREN 114  or permission.



  
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    FREN 155 - (LT) Love Literature through the Ages

    Semester Hours: 3
    Periodically
    The theme of love-literary treatment and attitudes revealed in representative works from its romantic courtly expression in the 12th century (Tristan et Iseult) to its anti-romantic manifestations in the 20th century.

    Prerequisite(s)/Course Notes:
    FREN 114  or permission.



  
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    FREN 160 - Translation

    Semester Hours: 3
    Periodically
    Introduction to the theory of translation and the contrastive structures of English and French. Extensive work in translating from French into English as well as exercises in translating English into French. Texts used for translation come from journalism, nonfiction and literature, and focus on culture-specific traits as revealed through language.

    Prerequisite(s)/Course Notes:
    FREN 114  or permission.



  
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    FREN 162 - (LT) Seminar in the French Theater

    Semester Hours: 3
    Periodically
    Systematic study of the traditions of French theater from the Middle Ages to the modern day. Regular classroom scene study. Students read texts from a literary and a dramatic perspective. Emphasis on the critical reading of a dramatic text as well as phonetic and gestural interpretation of written texts. Students present a final dramatic project in pairs or groups.

    Prerequisite(s)/Course Notes:
    FREN 109  or 110 , and 114 , or permission of instructor.



  
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    FREN 165 - French Phonetic Development

    Semester Hours: 3
    Summer
    Systematic study of sounds and intonation patterns. Class sessions will include explanation of the formation of sounds and the phonology rules as well as group exercises. Regular laboratory sessions will be assigned to drill and reinforce classroom work. Weekly phonetic dictations and tape recordings will check student’s progress in acquiring the correct speech habits necessary for effective communication.

    Prerequisite(s)/Course Notes:
    FREN 109  or 110 , FREN 111  or 112 .



  
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    FREN 166 - Advanced French Grammar and Phonetics

    Semester Hours: 3
    Summer
    In-depth review of the structure of the French language with focus on problems of phonetics, phonology, morphology and syntax. Special attention will be paid to oral expression and to elements of diglossia encountered in everyday communication. Class time will be devoted to drills, exercises and presentations prepared by the students.

    Prerequisite(s)/Course Notes:
    FREN 111  or 112 . Usually given as part of the Summer in France Program.



  
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    FREN 172 - (LT) The Theater of Corneille, Racine and Moliere

    Semester Hours: 3
    Periodically
    Origin and development of the 17th-century classical theater. Love and honor in tragedy, farce to high comedy in Moliere as revealed through discussions of selected works by the three playwrights.

    Prerequisite(s)/Course Notes:
    FREN 114  or permission.



  
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    FREN 180 A-Z - (LT) Special Topics in French and Francophonic Literature

    Semester Hours: 3


    Periodically
    These courses deal with specific issues, themes, genres, and authors.  The topics of these courses change every time the course is offered, therefore students can repeat this number for credit provided different titles. 

    Current Special Topics

    FREN 180I: Existentialism, Surrealism and the Theater of the Absurd

    The early twentieth century intellectual adventure in surrealist poetry, the theater and the novel with Gide, Breton, Camus, Sartre, Becket and Ionesco.

     

     


     

     

    Prerequisite(s)/Course Notes:
    FREN 114  or permission.



  
  
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    FREN 191 - (LT) From Romanticism to Symbolism

    Semester Hours: 3
    Periodically
    The 19th-century development of Romanticism and Symbolism as revealed in the theater and in poetry from Victor Hugo to Baudelaire, Rimbaud and Mallarmé.

    Prerequisite(s)/Course Notes:
    FREN 114  or permission.



  
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    FREN 192 - (LT) 19th-Century French Novel and Short Story

    Semester Hours: 3
    Periodically
    Topics selected from the following: the romantic novel, realism and naturalism in the novel, the novel and history, the short story in the 19th century.

    Prerequisite(s)/Course Notes:
    FREN 114  or permission.



  
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    FREN 195 - (LT) Modern French Theater

    Semester Hours: 3
    Periodically
    Exploration of major dramatic theories and techniques since the romantic age. Reading of representative works from Musset to Ionesco and Arrabal.

    Prerequisite(s)/Course Notes:
    FREN 114  or permission.



  
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    FREN 196 - (LT) Modern French Poetry

    Semester Hours: 3
    Periodically
    Major poets and poetic movements of the 20th century from Valéry, Dada and surrealism through Prévert, Cocteau, St. John Perse, Michaux, Ponge, Emanuel, et al.

    Prerequisite(s)/Course Notes:
    FREN 114  or permission.



  
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    FREN 197 - (LT) 20th-Century French Novel and Short Story

    Semester Hours: 3
    Periodically
    Topics selected from the following: the first generation, up to World War I, novels of childhood and adolescence, novels of the human condition, the “new novel.”

    Prerequisite(s)/Course Notes:
    FREN 114  or permission.



  
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    FREN 198 - (LT) Littérature Québécoise (Literature of Quebec)

    Semester Hours: 3
    Periodically
    A discovery of the cultural and literary traditions of Quebec through a close analysis of several texts by Québécois authors (prose fiction, poetry, theater, and cinema), leads to an understanding of 1) Quebec’s ties to France, 2) its distancing from France, 3) the association with English-speaking Canada/North America, and finally 4) the identity crises of a people of French heritage with a deep-rooted sense of being North American.

    Prerequisite(s)/Course Notes:
    FREN 114  or permission.



  
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    FREN 199 - Departmental Honors Candidacy: Essay

    Semester Hours: 3
    Fall, Spring
    The research for and the writing of a substantial essay in the field of French language and literature. Open only to senior French majors who desire to graduate with departmental honors and who secure, before registration, written permission of the instructor who will supervise the essay.




French Literature in Translation (FRLT)

  
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    FRLT 012F - First-Year Seminar

    Semester Hours: 3
    Fall
    This course gives first-year students the opportunity to work in a seminar format with a member of the faculty in an area of the faculty member’s research interests.

    Prerequisite(s)/Course Notes:
    The course is open to first-year students only. Topics vary by semester. Consult the class schedule for proper category listing. Students may take only one 12F or 12S seminar.



  
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    FRLT 012S - First-Year Seminar

    Semester Hours: 1-3
    Spring
    This course gives first-year students the opportunity to work in a seminar format with a member of the faculty in an area of the faculty member’s research interests.
     

    Prerequisite(s)/Course Notes:
    The course is open to first-year students only. Topics vary by semester. Students may take only one 12F or 12S seminar.



  
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    FRLT 014F - First-Year Seminar

    Semester Hours: 3-4
    Fall

    This course gives first-year students the opportunity to work in a seminar format with a member of the faculty in an area of the faculty member’s research interests.

    Prerequisite(s)/Course Notes:

    The course is open to first-year students only. Topics vary by semester. This course is offered for distribution credit; consult the Semester Planning Guide for proper category listing. Students may take only one 14F or 12F seminar and only one 14S or 12S seminar.



  
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    FRLT 014S - First-Year Seminar

    Semester Hours: 3-4
    Spring

    This course gives first-year students the opportunity to work in a seminar format with a member of the faculty in an area of the faculty member’s research interests.

    Prerequisite(s)/Course Notes:

    The course is open to first-year students only. Topics vary by semester.  This course is offered for distribution credit; consult the Semester Planning Guide for proper category listing. Students may take only one 14F or 12F seminar and only one 14S or 12S seminar.



  
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    FRLT 035 - (LT) French Short Story Tradition

    Semester Hours: 3
    Periodically
    Through close readings and analysis, students will become familiar with the structural elements and the concision of the modern short story form from its early appearance in France in the 18th century to the present day. Short stories from other Francophone communities may also be included in the readings.

    Prerequisite(s)/Course Notes:
    May not be taken on a Pass/D+/D/Fail basis.



  
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    FRLT 041 - (LT) Me, Myself, and I: Autobiographical Expressions from the French

    Semester Hours: 3
    Periodically
    An investigation of various forms of lifewriting translated from French, including autobiography, memoirs, diary, and correspondence. Texts, read in English, represent a wide variety of writings by women and men, from the Renaissance through the late 20th century, from Francophonia as well as from metropolitan France.



  
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    FRLT 042 - (LT) Heroines Exotic and Erotic: Romantic Women in 19th-Century French Narrative Prose

    Semester Hours: 3
    Periodically
    Critical examination of certain tenets of Romanticism as they reflect and form images of women in 19th-century French narrative prose. The impact and continuing influence of these images of femininity on contemporary ideals of womanhood are analyzed. Readings include texts by major 19th-century French novelists like Sand, Stendhal, Balzac, Flaubert, etc. All works are read in English.



  
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    FRLT 043 - (LT, CC) Decolonizing the Mind: Contemporary Literature from Africa to Southeast Asia

    Semester Hours: 3
    Periodically
    Examination of literary voices from Francophone countries including Senegal, Algeria, Tunisia. Topics include decolonization and the African identity, the search for self, the contradictions of life in the colonies and racism. Readings include works by Memmi, Ben Jelloun, Snow-Fall, Senghor. All works are read and discussed in English.

    Prerequisite(s)/Course Notes:
    Same as AFST 043 .



  
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    FRLT 044 - (LT) Major Works of French Literature to 1800

    Semester Hours: 3
    Periodically
    Selected from among major authors of France from the middle ages to the 18th century. No credit toward major in French  but may be used to fulfill part of the BA language or humanities requirement. All works are read and discussed in English.



  
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    FRLT 045 - (LT) Major Works of French Literature Since 1800

    Semester Hours: 3
    Periodically
    Selected from among major authors of France of the 19th and 20th centuries. No credit toward major in French  but may be used to fulfill part of the BA language or humanities requirement. All works are read and discussed in English.



  
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    FRLT 046 - (LT) Sex, Gender and Love in 20th-Century French Prose

    Semester Hours: 3
    Periodically
    Selected narrative and experimental texts examined to show the deconstruction and evolution of traditional concepts of sex, gender and love in 20th-century French literature. Gender reading techniques constitute the principal methodological approach, along with close textual analysis. Readings include works by Andre Gide, Colette, Simone de Beauvoir, Marguerite Duras, Luce Irigaray, Julia Kristeva, Monique Wittig and Jean Genet. All works are read and discussed in English.



  
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    FRLT 047 - (LT) French Literature and the World of Music

    Semester Hours: 3
    Periodically
    Study of the intersection of narrative and musical phenomena as manifested in the French literary tradition. No formal musical knowledge required but a sensitivity to musical and literary forms and techniques is exploited and formalized. Texts represent French literature from the Middle Ages to modern day. All works are read and discussed in English.



  
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    FRLT 048 - (LT) The Knightly Heritage in French Literature

    Semester Hours: 3
    Periodically
    Examination of the knightly themes established in the 12thcentury courtly romances Ywain and Tristan and Iseut, and their various embodiments in major literary works of the 17th and 18th centuries: the “splendid century” of French Classicism, and the age of Enlightenment and pre-Romanticism. Readings include works by Chrétien de Troyes, Corneille, Racine, Lafayette, Prévost, Voltaire, Staël. All works are read and discussed in English.



  
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    FRLT 049 - (LT) Irony in Modern French Literature

    Semester Hours: 3
    Periodically
    Examination of post-Nietzchean French literature showing the failure of the romantic ideal and the virtual impossibility of attaining and maintaining a heroic status for the modern protagonist. While archetypal criticism is the principal means of approaching the works, other methods are encouraged. Literary works by Gide, Malraux, Sartre, Giraudoux, Camus, Ionesco, Beckett, Robbe-Grillet and the surrealists. Critical theory by Northrup Frye. All works are read and discussed in English.



  
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    FRLT 050 - (LT, CC) Reconstructing French Caribbean Identities

    Semester Hours: 3
    Periodically
    Exploration of literary works from French Caribbean islands including Guadeloupe, Martinique and Haiti. Readings include works by Cesaire, Damas, Tirolien, Clitandre, Conde, Schwarz- Bart, Roumain, and others. Topics covered include colonialism, decolonization, racism, and the African heritage. All works are read and discussed in English.



  
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    FRLT 052 - (LT) Sovereignty and Quebec: A Literary and Cultural Perspective

    Semester Hours: 3
    Periodically
    Examination of the French presence in North America, with specific focus on the culture and literature of Quebec. The cultural and social struggle to maintain both a French and a North American identity as seen through the analysis of Québécois texts leads to a better understanding of the current political and cultural plight that faces Quebec citizens as they ponder the pros and cons of sovereignty and unity within Canada. American students come to a more discriminating sense of their own identity as North Americans. All works are read and discussed in English.

    Prerequisite(s)/Course Notes:
    Sophomore standing or above.



  
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    FRLT 060 - (LT) Modern French Feminist Thought

    Semester Hours: 3
    Periodically
    Exploration of 20th-century French feminism through works of theory and literature. No credit toward major in French  but may be used to fulfill part of the BA language or humanities requirement. All works are read and discussed in English.



  
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    FRLT 120 - (LT) Special Topics in French Literature and Civilization

    Semester Hours: 1-3
    January, Spring
    Movements, ideas and issues of special interest such as Dada and surrealism, the rebel and the outsider in modern French literature, history and literature; the idea of Utopia, etc. All works are read and discussed in English.

    Prerequisite(s)/Course Notes:
    May be repeated when topics vary.





Geography (GEOG)

  
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    GEOG 001 - (BH) World Regional Geography

    Semester Hours: 3
    Periodically
    An introductory course that offers students an overview of the major regions of the world, their characteristics, and the contemporary human and environmental issues and challenges faced by each. The course is organized along lines of economic development, with coverage of the more developed regions preceding that of less developed parts of the world.



  
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    GEOG 002 - (BH) Human Geography

    Semester Hours: 3
    Periodically
    Human geography focuses on how society drives environmental/ geographical issues. This course is an in-depth investigation of the key sub-fields of human geography, such as: Population Geography (demography and migration), Political Geography (nation states), Economic Geography (the structure and location of economic activities), Cultural Geography (the world’s major cultural regions) and Urban and Regional Geography (the structure of cities and their hinterlands). Each of these subdisciplines are examined to show how they enhance our spatial understanding of the world.

    Prerequisite(s)/Course Notes:
    This course is a requirement for geography majors and complements GEOG 003 .



  
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    GEOG 003 - (BH) The Geography of a Globalizing World

    Semester Hours: 3


    Periodically

    An introduction to the changing geography of a globalizing world. The course provides students with the conceptual basis for understanding and interpreting global change and the economic, political and cultural relationships that exist between and within the different regions of the world. The focus is on topics such as population, migration, the spatially uneven outcomes of political processes, economic development, environment and climate change, logistics, urbanization and cultural convergence and hybridity.  All are examined through the lens of the various sub-disciplines of geography.

    Prerequisite(s)/Course Notes:
    Credit given for this course or GS 001  , not both. (Formerly, Introduction to Geography.)



  
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    GEOG 004 - (BH) Cultural Geography

    Semester Hours: 3
    Periodically
    Cultural geography is one of the main subdisciplines of human geography. At the core of human geography are the concepts of place and space. In this course we will analyze the relationship between culture and the production of the geographic landscape. We also investigate how migration has led to cultural diffusion, and how culture influences perceptions of the natural environment and the usage of natural resources. Lastly, we analyze the cultural norms that underpin the allocation of public and private space, and how these norms in turn influence our sense of space and place.



  
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    GEOG 005 - (BH) Population and Migration Geography

    Semester Hours: 3
    Periodically
    This course introduces students to two of geography’s subdisciplines, both of great contemporary importance. Initially, students will learn about factors that influence population size, distribution, and structure, relating these to environmental, economic, and political impacts. Afterward, the focus shifts to migration, a very controversial process in many parts of the world. Several regional and national immigration case studies will be analyzed. Oral presentation required.

    Prerequisite(s)/Course Notes:
    Credit given for this course or SOC 147 , not both.



  
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    GEOG 006 - (BH) Resources and Energy Geography

    Semester Hours: 3
    Periodically
    This course is a broad introduction to the geography of resources. Geographical resources include natural, human, capital, as well as energy. Resources are fundamental to many activities and much value is attached to their procurement, transformation and use. Most resources are used to produce an outcome of economic value, such as providing food, energy, or materials for manufacturing and construction. The strategic importance of resource development and the multiple uses of resources will be analyzed.



  
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    GEOG 007 - Fun with Maps and GIS

    Semester Hours: 1
    Periodically
    A practical course that introduces non-geography students to the basics of geospatial data, Geographic Information Systems (GIS) software, and mapmaking. Students will collect or assemble geographic data, prepare that data for GIS, and use GIS to create a basic map. Students will develop beginner-level understandings of geospatial data, the principles of GIS, how to visualize real-world features, and cartographically communicating information. This one-credit course is for those who would like to use maps for their work, but have no prior geospatial, GIS, or cartographic experience.

    Prerequisite(s)/Course Notes:
    No credit toward the major  or the minor  in Geography. Grading is mandatory Pass/Fail. [Formerly Geographic Information Systems (GIS) for Beginners.]



  
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    GEOG 012F - First-Year Seminar

    Semester Hours: 3
    Fall
    This course gives first-year students the opportunity to work in a seminar format with a member of the faculty in an area of the faculty member’s research interests.

    Prerequisite(s)/Course Notes:
    The course is open to first-year students only. Topics vary by semester. Consult the class schedule for proper category listing. Students may take only one 12F or 12S seminar.



  
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    GEOG 012S - First-Year Seminar

    Semester Hours: 1-3
    Spring
    This course gives first-year students the opportunity to work in a seminar format with a member of the faculty in an area of the faculty member’s research interests.
     

    Prerequisite(s)/Course Notes:
    The course is open to first-year students only. Topics vary by semester. Students may take only one 12F or 12S seminar.



  
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    GEOG 014F - First-Year Seminar

    Semester Hours: 3-4
    Fall

    This course gives first-year students the opportunity to work in a seminar format with a member of the faculty in an area of the faculty member’s research interests.

    Prerequisite(s)/Course Notes:

    The course is open to first-year students only. Topics vary by semester.  This course is offered for distribution credit; consult the Semester Planning Guide for proper category listing. Students may take only one 14F or 12F seminar and only one 14S or 12S seminar.



  
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    GEOG 014S - First-Year Seminar

    Semester Hours: 3-4
    Spring

    This course gives first-year students the opportunity to work in a seminar format with a member of the faculty in an area of the faculty member’s research interests.

    Prerequisite(s)/Course Notes:

    The course is open to first-year students only. Topics vary by semester. This course is offered for distribution credit; consult the Semester Planning Guide for proper category listing. Students may take only one 14F or 12F seminar and only one 14S or 12S seminar.



  
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    GEOG 060 - Introduction to Geographic Information Systems and Digital Maps

    Semester Hours: 3


     

    Periodically

    This course introduces students to the foundations, concepts, and application techniques of map use and Geographic Information Systems (GIS). GIS technologies utilize mappable data to solve problems and answer questions by encoding, storing, analyzing, and visualizing geographic data. In this course, students will develop foundational knowledge about and basic skills involving the structures of geographic information, map interpretation, and GIS technologies. Examples include experience with GIS software, global positioning systems (GPS), categories of data management, demographic information, elevation data, aerial photo imagery, basic cartographic design, and cartographic rhetoric. This knowledge and these skills are valuable in a wide array of private and public sector careers. 

    Prerequisite(s)/Course Notes:
    Same as TPP 060 .



  
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    GEOG 080 - (BH) Transport Geography

    Semester Hours: 3


    Periodically

    Contemporary economic processes, such as the globalization of trade and the emergence of economic blocs, have been accompanied by significant growth in the movements of people, freight and information. Transport geography is concerned about these movements along with the infrastructures, institutions and corporations supporting them. It tries to link spatial constraints and attributes with the origin, the destination, the extent, and the nature and purpose of movements. Transportation, therefore, has varied and complex impacts over populations, economies and geography.

    Prerequisite(s)/Course Notes:
    Credit given for this course or GS 120, not both.



  
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    GEOG 100 - Departmental Honors Candidacy: Essay

    Semester Hours: 3
    Fall, Spring
    Research for and the writing of a substantial essay in the field of geography.

    Prerequisite(s)/Course Notes:
    GEOG 191  or permission of the department chairperson. Open only to qualified geography majors  who wish to graduate with departmental honors, and who secure, before registration, written permission of the chairperson and of the instructor who will supervise the essay; cumulative grade point average of at least 3.4; minimum grade point average of 3.5 in the geography major.



  
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    GEOG 102 - (BH) Population, Resources and Environment

    Semester Hours: 3
    Periodically
    Analyzes the relationships among population growth, factors influencing human migration, resource distribution and utilization, and the environmental impact of the human presence at various geographic scales ranging from local to global.



  
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    GEOG 103 - (BH) Cities and Suburbs

    Semester Hours: 3
    Periodically

    This course introduces students to the key features of urban geography, including the distribution, structure and hierarchy of cities, the economic basis for cities, the growth of world cities, and the development of suburbs. The course also examines urban issues such as access to housing, homelessness, segregation and exclusion, as well as urban policy and urban and regional planning. While the scope is global, the emphasis is on the development of cities and suburbs in the United States.



  
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    GEOG 104 A-Z - Special Topics in Geography

    Semester Hours: 1-3
    Periodically
    This course provides a study of a particular subject or problem in geography, with the specific topic for the course varying from semester to semester. Possible course topics include an introduction to geographical information systems (GIS), transportation geography, urbanization in the developing world, the economic geography of China, and environmental geography. Students should consult with the particular instructor each time the course is offered to determine if prior preparation for the topic to be covered is recommended. Such consultation may take place prior to registration or on the first day of class.

    Prerequisite(s)/Course Notes:
    May be repeated for credit when topics vary. Specific titles and course descriptions for special topics courses are available in the online class schedule.



  
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    GEOG 106 - (BH, CC) Urbanization in the Developing World

    Semester Hours: 3
    Periodically
    Coping with rapid urbanization and the uncontrolled growth of cities, poses one of the greatest geographical challenges facing the nations of the developing world. This course introduces students to the study of urbanization in the developing world and explores the urban problems such as insufficient infrastructure, unemployment, lack of housing and inadequate social services that occur in these cities. The course has a regional focus and looks at the development of cities in Latin America, Asia, Sub-Saharan Africa, and North Africa and the Middle East, highlighting each regions distinctive urban patterns and problems. The last section of the course looks at possible solutions and policies that could be adopted to help alleviate the problems of rapid urbanization and poverty in the cities of the developing world.



  
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    GEOG 107 - Urban Geography of Western Europe

    Semester Hours: 3
    Periodically
    The course examines the organization of cities and urban areas in Western Europe. Topical concerns that are discussed include affordable housing, urban planning, transportation, sustainability, segregation, and the problems of increasing urban inequality. The course also draws on specific case studies, including detailed discussion of urban issues in Barcelona, Paris, London, and Berlin, and looks at the ways in which globalization is affecting the urban culture and work opportunities in the cities under review.

    Prerequisite(s)/Course Notes:
    GEOG 001  or 002  or 103  or 106  or GS 001  or 002 , or permission of the department chairperson.



  
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    GEOG 110 - (BH) Geography of the United States and Canada

    Semester Hours: 3
    Periodically
    Geographic factors affecting the exploration, settlement, population distribution, land use, and economic development of the United States and Canada.



  
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    GEOG 113C - (CC) Geography of East and Southeast Asia

    Semester Hours: 3
    Periodically
    This course examines East and Southeast Asia, commonly known as Pacific Asia. Pacific Asian societies have experienced various phases of development since the end of World War II. Topics include socioeconomic features of: Japan, China, South Korea, Hong Kong, Taiwan, Singapore and other countries such as Malaysia, Thailand, Indonesia, Vietnam and the Philippines. Problems and prospects of development in the region as well as issues related to urbanization, transportation, agriculture and resource development are covered.

    Prerequisite(s)/Course Notes:
    Credit given for this course or GEOG 113, not both.



  
  •  

    GEOG 114 - (BH, CC) India and its Neighbors

    Semester Hours: 3
    Periodically

    Analyzes the geography of South Asia, (i.e., the countries of Afghanistan, Pakistan, India, Nepal, Bhutan, Bangladesh, Sri Lanka and the Maldives) with a special focus on the geography of India. Emphasis will be on cultural, economic and political geography. Topics covered include the geo-politics of the region, climate change, globalization, urbanization and rural development, migration, religion, health and disease, gender roles, child labor and contemporary slavery.



  
  •  

    GEOG 115 - (IS)(CC) Global Health Geography

    Semester Hours: 3


    Global Health Geography will introduce students to the connections between our environment, social context, and health, across global and local scales through core geographical concepts of space and place. Key topics will include the common myths about and the actual spatial distribution and diffusion of diseases as people move, the roles of place in community and infrastructure that shape health, access to health care in different parts of the world, connections between landscape, climate change and health, and the health challenges of migration, including forced migration and human trafficking. Students will be exposed to both quantitative and qualitative research methodologies, including how mapping and qualitative interview techniques can be applied in the study of health.

     

    Prerequisite(s)/Course Notes:
    Credit will be given for this class or GS 115, not both.



  
  •  

    GEOG 122 - (BH) The Geography of Western Europe

    Semester Hours: 3
    Periodically
    Analysis of the geographic factors affecting the history, culture, demography and economic development of Western Europe and its various regions and countries. Topics include, population, migration, urbanization and cities, physical geography, political structures and development, the European Union and economic geography. 

    Prerequisite(s)/Course Notes:
    (Formerly Western Europe.)



  
  •  

    GEOG 123 - (BH) Eastern Europe and the Republics of the Former Soviet Union

    Semester Hours: 3
    Periodically
    Study of the environment and peoples of the republics of the former U.S.S.R. and Yugoslavia, and of Poland, the Baltic states, Czek Republic, Slovakia, Hungary, Romania, Bulgaria and Albania. Emphasis on past territorial changes and recent social, economic and political transitions.



  
  •  

    GEOG 131 - Japan

    Semester Hours: 3
    Periodically
    Description and analysis of the geographic aspects of the modernization of Japan, with emphasis on the economic, population and urban geography of the country.



  
  •  

    GEOG 135 - (BH) Economic Geography

    Semester Hours: 3
    Periodically
    Theory and analysis of the location of economic activities; distribution and hierarchy of central places; land use; delineation, structure and growth of economic regions.

    Prerequisite(s)/Course Notes:
    May be used toward the 33 s.h. in economics required of economics majors.



  
  •  

    GEOG 140 - (BH, CC) Geography of Latin America

    Semester Hours: 3
    Periodically
    Study of the physical and human geographic roots of Latin American societies, from Mexico to the southern cone of South America. Explores the forces that shaped this unique region and considers its role in the contemporary world. Impact of historical geography since pre-Columbian period on modern Latin America. Economic and political geography in relation to other world regions. Changing human landscapes and social transformations currently affecting many of the area’s inhabitants.



  
  •  

    GEOG 141 - (BH, CC) Caribbean Geographies

    Semester Hours: 3
    Periodically

    An exploration of the physical and human landscapes of the Caribbean Basin. The course focuses on how geopolitics has shaped the region and how Caribbean peoples have strived to define their political, economic and cultural trajectory. While analyzing the characteristics that define the region as a whole, special attention is paid to the geography of individual countries and territories such as Cuba, Haiti, Dominican Republic, Jamaica, Puerto Rico, Martinique, Trinidad and Tobago and the Virgin Islands, among others.



  
  •  

    GEOG 142 - (BH, CC) Geography of Mexico and Central America

    Semester Hours: 3
    Periodically
    This course will provide students with an overview of the physical and human landscapes of Mexico and Central America, as well as an analysis of the region’s multi-layered relationship with the United States.

    Prerequisite(s)/Course Notes:
    This course may be offered either on the Hofstra campus or as part of Hofstra’s study abroad program in Latin America, when that program operates in Mexico or Central America.



  
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    GEOG 143 - (BH, CC) Geography of South America

    Semester Hours: 3
    Periodically
    Course introduces students to the physical and human landscapes of South America. After beginning with the development of several themes that unite the continent and Latin America more generally, the course shifts to a country-by-country approach to explore the sub-regions, cultures, economic geography, and social issues affecting each of South America’s 13 countries.



  
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    GEOG 145 - (BH, CC) Geography of Africa

    Semester Hours: 3
    Once a year
    Study of Africa’s diverse human and physical landscapes, focusing on the interaction between the two. Analysis of the cultural, environmental, economic, social, political and population geography of the continent. Both North Africa and sub-Saharan Africa, the continent’s two major regions, are featured prominently and examples are drawn from many of Africa’s more than 50 individual nation-states.



  
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    GEOG 148 - (BH) Geography of Australia and the South Pacific

    Semester Hours: 3
    Periodically
    This course introduces students to the physical and human landscapes of a fascinating continent-country and its neighboring island countries in the South Pacific. Topics include the physical geography, settlement geography, economic geography, and environmental geography of the region. On selected occasions during the summer session, the course will be offered in Australia, with two weeks of classes at Hofstra followed by field work in the Australian Outback, the Queensland rainforest, the Great Barrier Reef, and Sydney, Australia’s major city.

    Prerequisite(s)/Course Notes:
    There is a program fee for this course when offered in Australia.



  
  •  

    GEOG 151 - Undergraduate Research in Geography

    Semester Hours: 1-3
    Periodically
    Intensive reading, oral, and written work focusing on a regional and/or topical subdiscipline of geography. Open only to students interested in pursuing advanced work in geography and who have arranged to work with a supervising faculty member.

    Prerequisite(s)/Course Notes:
    A combination of any two semesters of geography courses offered at Hofstra.



  
  •  

    GEOG 152 - Undergraduate Research in Geography

    Semester Hours: 1-3
    Periodically
    Intensive reading, oral, and written work focusing on a regional and/or topical subdiscipline of geography. Open only to students interested in pursuing advanced work in geography and who have arranged to work with a supervising faculty member.

    Prerequisite(s)/Course Notes:
    A combination of any two semesters of geography courses offered at Hofstra.



  
  •  

    GEOG 153 - Undergraduate Research in Geography

    Semester Hours: 1-3
    Periodically
    Intensive reading, oral, and written work focusing on a regional and/or topical subdiscipline of geography. Open only to students interested in pursuing advanced work in geography and who have arranged to work with a supervising faculty member.

    Prerequisite(s)/Course Notes:
    A combination of any two semesters of geography courses offered at Hofstra.



  
  •  

    GEOG 154 - Undergraduate Research in Geography

    Semester Hours: 1-3
    Periodically

    Intensive reading, oral and written work focusing on a regional and/or topical subdiscipline of geography. Open only to students interested in pursuing advanced work in geography and who have arranged to work with a supervising faculty member.

    Prerequisite(s)/Course Notes:
    A combination of any two semesters of geography courses offered at Hofstra.



  
  •  

    GEOG 159 - (IS) Cartographic Communication: The Power of Mapmaking

    Semester Hours: 3
    Periodically
    Maps and geographic visualizations are increasingly common in everyday life and many professional careers. Being able to interpret and evaluate these complex, data-heavy graphics is important to being part of modern society. Students will evaluate and create professional-grade maps for use in professional and popular contexts using Geographic Information Systems (GIS) and graphic design techniques. The course covers tools, data sources, map projections, cartographic color, typography, and layout. In addition, students will learn about the social history and political and ethical implications of mapmaking. The course emphasizes hands-on GIS work.

    Prerequisite(s)/Course Notes:
    GEOG 060 . Lab fee additional.



  
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    GEOG 160 - Intermediate Geographic Information Systems

    Semester Hours: 3
    Periodically
    Geographic Information Systems (GIS) are used to encode, store, analyze, and report spatial data. This multimedia course expands the GIS foundations, concepts, and application techniques already acquired in the introductory course (GEOG 060 - Introduction to Geographic Information Systems and Digital Maps ). It mainly focuses upon the professional applications of the GIS technology as well as the understanding of more advanced spatial analysis functions such as geocoding, classification, statistical surfaces, overlay and network analysis. The student is expected to become proficient in applying GIS for the analysis of problems in a wide array of fields.

    Prerequisite(s)/Course Notes:
    GEOG 060  or approval of instructor. Lab fee additional.



  
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    GEOG 161 - Geographic Information Systems (GIS) for the Natural Sciences

    Semester Hours: 3
    Periodically
    This course is intended to introduce students to the principles and methods of GIS in a multidisciplinary context with applications in natural sciences (such as biology, geology) and applied sciences (engineering). Hands-on laboratory exercises with ArcView software and its extensions will allow students to acquire practical experience in editing, integration, geocoding, display, and analysis of spatial and non-spatial data through multi-layered maps using data from various sources. Emphasis on:  remote sensing to collect data and integrate it with GIS; home range analysis to determine habitat usage and occupancy patterns; vegetation patterns. The course will bring the real-world experience into the class by means of case studies in land-use planning, environmental impact studies, asset management, and transportation engineering.

    Prerequisite(s)/Course Notes:
    Sophomore class standing or above. Lab fee additional.



  
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    GEOG 162 - (IS) Geospatial Remote Sensing

    Semester Hours: 3
    Periodically

    Remote sensing is a set of methods for obtaining information about an area or object without direct physical contact with that area or object. This course introduces students to the basics of geospatial remote sensing, characteristics of remote sensors, remote sensing analyses for research, government and industrial applications. The course emphasizes hands-on training in image acquisition, data evaluation, data management and geographic analyses across social and environmental topics. Students will practice use of geographic information systems (GIS) and related methods and tools. Lab assignments will supplement classroom discussion and reading assignments.

    Prerequisite(s)/Course Notes:
    Lab fee additional.



  
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    GEOG 170 - Advanced Geographic Information Systems (GIS)

    Semester Hours: 3
    Periodically
    Geographic Information Systems (GIS) are used to encode, store, analyze, and report spatial data. This advanced course expands the GIS foundations, concepts, and application techniques already acquired in the introductory and intermediate GIS courses (GEOG 060  and GEOG 160 ). It mainly focuses upon the professional applications of GIS technology, such as project management, geodatabase creation, advanced cartography, and data analysis. The student is expected to become proficient in applying GIS to the analysis of problems in a wide array of fields. The course is interdisciplinary; students may choose projects related to their area of interest (e.g., geography, sustainability, ecology, geology, history, etc.).

    Prerequisite(s)/Course Notes:
    GEOG 160  or permission of instructor. Lab fee additional.



  
  •  

    GEOG 180 - Field Studies in Geography

    Semester Hours: 3
    Periodically
    This course will examine, both theoretically and experientially, a range of methodologies and techniques utilized in field studies in physical, human, and environmental geography. This examination also involves understanding the processes of globalization and modernization and their impacts on the various sites that are observed in the field. Key concepts such as scale, time, succession, and sustainability will be used to observe and understand the diverse landscapes of urban, suburban, and rural spaces. GEOG 180 will be taught in the field, since that is where geographers seek the information that provides the basis of the great majority of their research. It is designed in a flexible manner that will allow it to be incorporated into a Hofstra study abroad program or a U.S.-based study-travel program, or to be offered as a locally taught course that will involve day trips into the field within the greater metropolitan area.

    Prerequisite(s)/Course Notes:
    GEOG 001  or 002  or GS 001  or 002  or permission of the department chairperson.



  
  •  

    GEOG 190 - Internship in Geography

    Semester Hours: 1-3
    Fall, January, Spring, Summer
    This work-study program aims at providing students with an opportunity to apply academic and theoretical knowledge to practical situations.

    Prerequisite(s)/Course Notes:
    18 s.h. in courses recognized as part of the geography program, with a geography GPA of 3.0. or above; or by permission of chairperson of Global Studies and Geography . A minimum of 28 hours of work (for each sh of credit) in an approved academic, government, non-government or research institution is combined with classroom meetings, reading and writing assignments including an in-depth term paper that situates the internship experience within the broader framework of geography scholarship.



  
  •  

    GEOG 191 - Seminar: Geographic Methodology

    Semester Hours: 3


    Periodically

    Covers the fundamental issues associated with research in the social sciences, with a specific focus on geographic analysis. Topics addressed include development of a research project, formulation of research questions and hypotheses, searching for pertinent academic literature, and qualitative and quantitative research approaches and methods. The research project is developed on a topic chosen by each student.  It includes a literature review, a survey instrument and a methodology section. In addition to other modes of evaluation, an oral presentation of the research proposal to the class is required.

    Prerequisite(s)/Course Notes:
     

    A minimum of 18 s.h. of completed credits that count toward the major in Geography, Global Studies, Geography (GIS) or by permission of the department chairperson.



  
  •  

    GEOG 193 - Seminar: Economic Geography

    Semester Hours: 3
    Periodically
    Review of history and the literature. Methodology for investigating economic, geographic problems. Oral and written reports are required.

    Prerequisite(s)/Course Notes:
    GEOG 135  or permission of instructor. May be used toward the 33 s.h. in economics required of economics majors.




Geology (GEOL)

  
  •  

    GEOL 001 - (NS) Planet Earth

    Semester Hours: 3
    Fall, Spring, Summer
    Origin and evolution of the universe, elements, solar system, earth, continents, oceans and atmosphere set in the context of modern plate tectonic theory. The relationship of principal earth components (rocks and minerals) to materials useful to society (ores, fossil fuels and gemstones). Effects of surface processes (rivers, deserts, glaciation, soils) in the context of contemporary problems, including water supply, hurricanes and world climate. Study of tectonic forces with the related geologic hazards of volcanism and earthquakes. Written research report and in-class oral presentation using visual media required of all students. Field trip supports course topics. (2 hours lecture, 2 hours laboratory.)

    Prerequisite(s)/Course Notes:
    Credit given for this course or GEOL 011 , not both. (Formerly 1C; Physical Geological Science.)



  
  •  

    GEOL 002 - (NS) Historical Geological Science

    Semester Hours: 3
    Spring
    Origin and evolution of the Earth and biosphere throughout geologic time. Methods and theory used to reconstruct the events of the Archean, Proterozoic, Paleozoic, Mesozoic and Cenozoic Eras.  Geochronology and the Geologic Time Scale. Evolution, extinction and the fossil record. Continental drift, polar wandering, and seafloor spreading as the basis of modem plate tectonic theory. Geological evolution of New York state. Written research report and in-class oral presentation using visual media required of all students. Field trip supports course topics. (2 hours lecture, 2 hours laboratory.)



  
  •  

    GEOL 003 - (NS) Astrogeology

    Semester Hours: 3
    Periodically
    Utilizing the latest advances in scientific research, this course introduces students to the history of space travel and analysis of planetary geological data. Lecture topics include the internal structure and evolution of the earth-moon system in comparison to the other planets in our solar system. Laboratories include terrestrial sample analysis, cartographic and geomorphic studies, video and computer-based analysis. Written research report and in-class oral presentation using visual media required of all students. Field trips support course topics. (2 hours lecture, 2 hours laboratory.)



  
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    GEOL 004 - (NS) Introduction to Gemology and Gemstones

    Semester Hours: 3
    Periodically
    Study of gem minerals, as a specialized branch of mineralogy. The role of gems as rock forming minerals including the genetic origin in igneous, sedimentary and metamorphic rocks and process environments are discussed. Crystal structure, atomic distribution, chemical composition, chromophores and interrelated physical properties of gem minerals including hardness, cleavage, color, density, and refractive index are emphasized. Testing procedures for the identification of common gemstones and synthetic gemstones focus on density and optical measurements. Written research report and in-class oral presentation using visual media required of all students. Field trip to American Museum of Natural History supports course topics. (2 hours lecture, 2 hours laboratory.)



  
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    GEOL 005 - (NS) Environmental Geology

    Semester Hours: 3
    Fall
    Students will explore the basic functioning of Earth’s systems, including the cycling of solid materials, water, and nutrients. Students will study anthropogenic impacts on these systems that present challenges to the sustainability of human societies. Quantitative techniques that geologists use to analyze environmental problems will be introduced. Small group research projects will culminate in formal presentations created by students and presented orally in class. (2 hours lecture, 2 hours laboratory.)

    Prerequisite(s)/Course Notes:
    (Formerly Environmental Geology and Natural Hazards.)



  
  •  

    GEOL 006 - (NS) Introduction to Dinosaurs and the Mesozoic World

    Semester Hours: 3
    Summer
    Drawing on the latest geological and paleontological research, this course introduces the student to the scientific methods and thinking used to reconstruct the history of the Earth. Although the focus of the course is on dinosaurs and the characteristics of the Mesozoic world in which they lived, students learn how fundamental scientific theories such as geochronology, evolution, and plate tectonics provide the framework for interpreting the geologic past. Course topics also include the history of dinosaur paleontology, the climate, flora, and fauna of the Mesozoic, the evolution of birds, dinosaur paleobiology, and the riddle of the extinction of the dinosaurs. Written research report and in-class oral presentation using visual media required of all students. Field trips support course topics. (2 hours lecture, 2 hours laboratory.)



  
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    GEOL 007 - (NS) Earth Science I

    Semester Hours: 3
    Summer
    This course addresses topics covered in the New York State Regents Earth Science curriculum, including the structure of the Earth, seismology, the origin of the universe, the solar system, and basic climate science and meteorology. (2 hours lecture, 2 hours laboratory.)

    Prerequisite(s)/Course Notes:
    This course is required of secondary science education majors for certification to teach Earth science. It also satisfies a liberal arts distribution requirement in the natural sciences; however, this course is an elective for non-education track geology majors and does not count for major credit.



  
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    GEOL 009 - Introduction to Earth Resources

    Semester Hours: 3
    Periodically
    Analysis of the distribution, quality and quantity of U.S. mineral, energy and water resources (iron, aluminum, bauxite, coal, uranium, etc.). The interplay of the social, environmental, economic and political factors which affect the utilization of these resources. A discussion of the economic and environmental considerations that influence the exploitation, conservation or recycling of these resources and the selection of alternate energy sources. (3 hours lecture.)



  
  •  

    GEOL 010 - Environmental Geology

    Semester Hours: 3
    Periodically
    Effects of human activities on geologic forces and features and vice versa; planned and accidental changes in developmental patterns of soil, streams, estuaries and coastlines; analysis of human attempts to modify the actions of storms, floods, droughts, avalanches, earthquakes and volcanoes; geologic problems of economic and energy resources, urban and industrial expansion and of air, water and soil pollution. Field trips strongly recommended. (3 hours lecture.)



  
  •  

    GEOL 011 - Physical Geology

    Semester Hours: 3
    Periodically
    Origin, evolution and geologic cycles of minerals and rocks. Concerns the processes and features on the surface of the earth and how they have been modified by water, ice, wind and man. Deals with geologic principles applied to problems of energy and economic resources, natural hazards (earthquake, beach erosion, floods, etc.), urban expansion and environmental effects from pollution. Field trips strongly recommended. (3 hours lecture.)

    Prerequisite(s)/Course Notes:
    Credit given for this course or GEOL 001 , not both.



  
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    GEOL 012 - Earth History and Crustal Evolution

    Semester Hours: 3
    Periodically
    Principles and methods used in the analysis and interpretation of ancient life and earth history-its paleogeography, paleontology and paleoclimates. Includes the study of continents, oceans and ocean basins in relation to continental drift and seafloor spreading (the global tectonics). Considers the origin of the earth, its crust, atmosphere, oceans and life. Field trips strongly recommended. (3 hours lecture.)



  
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    GEOL 012F - First-Year Seminar

    Semester Hours: 3
    Fall
    This course gives first-year students the opportunity to work in a seminar format with a member of the faculty in an area of the faculty member’s research interests. 

    Prerequisite(s)/Course Notes:
    The course is open to first-year students only. Topics vary by semester. Consult the class schedule for proper category listing. Students may take only one 12F or 12S seminar.



  
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    GEOL 012S - First-Year Seminar

    Semester Hours: 3
    Spring
    This course gives first-year students the opportunity to work in a seminar format with a member of the faculty in an area of the faculty member’s research interests.

    Prerequisite(s)/Course Notes:
    The course is open to first-year students only. Topics vary by semester. Consult the class schedule for proper category listing. Students may take only one 12F or 12S seminar.



  
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    GEOL 014F - First-Year Seminar

    Semester Hours: 3-4
    Fall
    This course gives first-year students the opportunity to work in a seminar format with a member of the faculty in an area of the faculty member’s research interests. Written research report and in-class oral presentation using visual media required of all students. Field trips support course topics.

    Prerequisite(s)/Course Notes:
    The course is open to first-year students only. Topics vary by semester.  This course is offered for distribution credit; consult the Semester Planning Guide for proper category listing. Students may take only one 14F or 12F seminar and only one 14S or 12S seminar



 

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