Feb 08, 2023  
2020-2021 Undergraduate Bulletin 
    
2020-2021 Undergraduate Bulletin [ARCHIVED BULLETIN]

Course Descriptions


 

Disability Studies (DSST)

  
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    DSST 012F - First-Year Seminar

    Semester Hours: 3
    Fall
    This course gives first-year students the opportunity to work in a seminar format with a member of the faculty in an area of the faculty member’s research interests.

    Prerequisite(s)/Course Notes:
    The course is open to first-year students only. Topics vary by semester. Consult the class schedule for proper category listing. Students may take only one 12F or 12S seminar.



  
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    DSST 012S - First-Year Seminar

    Semester Hours: 1-3


    Spring
    This course gives first-year students the opportunity to work in a seminar format with a member of the faculty in an area of the faculty member’s research interests.

     

    Prerequisite(s)/Course Notes:
    The course is open to first-year students only. Topics vary by semester. Students may take only one 12F or 12S seminar.



  
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    DSST 014F - First-Year Seminar

    Semester Hours: 3-4
    Fall

    This course gives first-year students the opportunity to work in a seminar format with a member of the faculty in an area of the faculty member’s research interests.

    Prerequisite(s)/Course Notes:

    The course is open to first-year students only. Topics vary by semester. This course is offered for distribution credit; consult the Semester Planning Guide for proper category listing. Students may take only one 14F or 12F seminar and only one 14S or 12S seminar.



  
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    DSST 014S - First-Year Seminar

    Semester Hours: 3-4
    Spring
    This course gives first-year students the opportunity to work in a seminar format with a member of the faculty in an area of the faculty member’s research interests.

    Prerequisite(s)/Course Notes:

    The course is open to first-year students only. Topics vary by semester. This course is offered for distribution credit; consult the Semester Planning Guide for proper category listing. Students may take only one 14F or 12F seminar and only one 14S or 12S seminar.



  
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    DSST 150 A-Z - Special Topics in Disability Studies

    Semester Hours: 1-4
    Special topics courses explore current developments in the field of Disability Studies. Topics will vary by semester. 

    Prerequisite(s)/Course Notes:
    Subjects will change from semester to semester and the course may be repeated for credit when topics vary. Specific titles and course descriptions for special topics courses are available in the online class schedule.



  
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    DSST 188 - Independent Study in Disability Studies

    Semester Hours: 1-3
    An individualized course of readings in an area of Disability Studies not covered in regular courses, to be arranged in consultation with the instructor. Reading and writing (or other) requirements to be determined by the instructor.

    Prerequisite(s)/Course Notes:
    DSST 001  or 002  and permission of the instructor. May be used in partial fulfillment of requirements for a minor in disability studies .



  
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    DSST 198 - Departmental Honors Candidacy: Essay

    Semester Hours: 3
    Fall, Spring
    Research for and writing of a substantial essay in disability studies. Open only to disability studies students  who are eligible and desire to graduate with departmental honors. Interested students must secure, before registration, written permission of the instructor who will supervise the essay.

    Prerequisite(s)/Course Notes:
    Minimum overall GPA of 3.6. May be repeated for credit up to a maximum of 6 s.h., if taken in both fall and spring of senior year.  May not be taken on a Pass/D+/D/Fail basis.




Drama (DRAM)

  
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    DRAM 001 - (AA) Theater Appreciation I

    Semester Hours: 3-4
    Once a Year
    Introduction to theatrical art for the general student, its nature as a composite creation and its contribution to western culture. Analysis and appreciation of the elements which compose the art of the theater.



  
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    DRAM 003 - The New York Theater Experience

    Semester Hours: 3
    In this lively class, students travel in teacher - guided groups to New York City to see a wide variety of theater, including Broadway, Off-Broadway, Off-Off-Broadway, experimental theater, and opera. By the end of the semester all students will have a greater understanding and appreciation of the wide variety of theatrical experiences available in The Big Apple, and the confidence to navigate New York City on their own.

    Prerequisite(s)/Course Notes:
    Lab fee additional.



  
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    DRAM 004 - Freshman Theater Laboratory

    Semester Hours: 0.5
    Fall, Spring
    This course introduces the freshman theater student to the Hofstra theater community, and prepares the student for active participation in University theater productions, leading ultimately to a career in the theater. Practical emphasis is placed on acquiring auditioning and/or production skills.

    Prerequisite(s)/Course Notes:
    Open to first-year BA drama  majors only or by permission. Pass/D+/D/Fail grade only.



  
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    DRAM 005 - Play Production

    Semester Hours: 4
    Fall, Spring
    Introduction to backstage organization and basic practices in stagecraft, lighting and other phases of theatrical production. Required of all drama majors  in freshman or sophomore year. Laboratory hours arranged by instructor. Students are subject to production call beyond regular class hours.

    Prerequisite(s)/Course Notes:
    No liberal arts credit.



  
  
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    DRAM 012F - First-Year Seminar

    Semester Hours: 3
    Fall
    This course gives first-year students the opportunity to work in a seminar format with a member of the faculty in an area of the faculty member’s research interests.

    Prerequisite(s)/Course Notes:
    The course is open to first-year students only. Topics vary by semester. Consult the class schedule for proper category listing. Students may take only one 12F or 12S seminar.



  
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    DRAM 012S - First-Year Seminar

    Semester Hours: 1-3
    Spring
    This course gives first-year students the opportunity to work in a seminar format with a member of the faculty in an area of the faculty member’s research interests.

    Prerequisite(s)/Course Notes:
    The course is open to first-year students only. Topics vary by semester. Students may take only one 12F or 12S seminar.



  
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    DRAM 013 - Speech for the Actor

    Semester Hours: 3
    Once a year
    Basic principles of stage speech. Practice hours in addition to regular class meetings will be required. For drama majors  only or by permission of instructor.

    Prerequisite(s)/Course Notes:
    No liberal arts credit.



  
  
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    DRAM 014F - First-Year Seminar

    Semester Hours: 3-4
    Fall

    This course gives first-year students the opportunity to work in a seminar format with a member of the faculty in an area of the faculty member’s research interests.

    Prerequisite(s)/Course Notes:

    The course is open to first-year students only. Topics vary by semester. This course is offered for distribution credit; consult the Semester Planning Guide for proper category listing. Students may take only one 14F or 12F seminar and only one 14S or 12S seminar.



  
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    DRAM 014S - First-Year Seminar

    Semester Hours: 3-4
    Spring

    This course gives first-year students the opportunity to work in a seminar format with a member of the faculty in an area of the faculty member’s research interests.

    Prerequisite(s)/Course Notes:

    The course is open to first-year students only. Topics vary by semester. This course is offered for distribution credit; consult the Semester Planning Guide for proper category listing. Students may take only one 14F or 12F seminar and only one 14S or 12S seminar.



  
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    DRAM 015 - Basic Stage Makeup

    Semester Hours: 2


    Fall, Spring
    Fundamentals of straight and corrective makeup with emphasis on styling techniques for the thrust, arena and proscenium stage.

    Prerequisite(s)/Course Notes:
    For drama majors  only or by permission of the instructor. No liberal arts credit. Materials fee additional.

     



  
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    DRAM 016 - Stage Lighting

    Semester Hours: 2
    Spring
    The mechanical and technological basis of stage lighting. Study and practice of the fundamental processes which are necessary groundwork for lighting design.

    Prerequisite(s)/Course Notes:
    No liberal arts credit. 



  
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    DRAM 017 - Scenic Art for the Theater

    Semester Hours: 2
    Every other year
    Fundamentals of theatrical scenic art. Covering color mixing, tools, layout, scenic brush techniques, tromp-l’oeil, faux painting and texturing. Discussion of scenic designer/scenic artist relationship.

    Prerequisite(s)/Course Notes:
    DRAM 005 . No liberal arts credit. Materials fee of $100. (Formerly Scene Construction and Painting Techniques.)



  
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    DRAM 018 - Costume Construction

    Semester Hours: 2
    Every Other Year
    A beginning laboratory course devoted to the techniques of draping, sizing and cutting of costumes for the theater. Emphasis on methods and materials.

    Prerequisite(s)/Course Notes:
    DRAM 005 . No liberal arts credit. Lab fee additional.



  
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    DRAM 019 - Rigging and Scenery for the Stage

    Semester Hours: 2
    Every other year
    Specific practices of assembling, rigging and moving scenic units. Basic traditional methodology as well as new methods and techniques (mechanical and scientific) adaptable to the theater.

    Prerequisite(s)/Course Notes:
    DRAM 005 . No liberal arts credit.



  
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    DRAM 020 - Sound for the Theater

    Semester Hours: 2
    Every Other Year
    Sources, processes and procedures used in creating and obtaining properties and sound and music into a performance. Project work includes the finding and recording of sound material and the operation of sound equipment.

    Prerequisite(s)/Course Notes:
    No liberal arts credit.



  
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    DRAM 021 - Properties for the Theater

    Semester Hours: 2
    Every Other Year

    The materials and techniques of property construction, and an overview of theatrical and historical style and how they relate to the needs of the script; the organization and operation of the prop department within a theatrical production.  

    Prerequisite(s)/Course Notes:
    DRAM 005 . No liberal arts credit. May not be taken on a Pass/D+/D/Fail basis. Materials fee $80.



  
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    DRAM 022 - Drafting for the Theater

    Semester Hours: 2
    Fall
    Intensive, project oriented, skills course in drafting principles and graphic standards for the theater.

    Prerequisite(s)/Course Notes:
    DRAM 005 . Corequisite: DRAM 178 . No liberal arts credit. May not be taken on a Pass/D+/D/F basis.   



  
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    DRAM 023 - Speech for the Actor (Advanced)

    Semester Hours: 2
    Once a year
    Further development of the voice as to range, flexibility, resonance; intensive work in diction for classical drama; dialects. Application of these techniques to representative dramatic literature. One additional weekly contact hour is scheduled because of individualized demands of the course material.

    Prerequisite(s)/Course Notes:
    DRAM 013  and 014 . No liberal arts credit.



  
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    DRAM 024 - Speech for the Actor (Advanced)

    Semester Hours: 2
    Once a year
    Further development of the voice as to range, flexibility, resonance; intensive work in diction for classical drama; dialects. Application of these techniques to representative dramatic literature. One additional weekly contact hour is scheduled because of individualized demands of the course material.

    Prerequisite(s)/Course Notes:
    DRAM 013 , 014  and 023 . No liberal arts credit.



  
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    DRAM 031 - Movement for the Actor I

    Semester Hours: 2
    Fall, Spring
    The applied study of basic, physical preparation for performance in the theatrical arena. The course examines physical awareness through improvisation exercises and warm-up techniques. Explorations using shape, time, space, and stillness to better understand the physical necessity for clearer and more expressive communication in performance.

    Prerequisite(s)/Course Notes:
    DRAM 059  or 059A . No liberal arts credit. May not be taken on a Pass/D+/D/Fail basis.



  
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    DRAM 032 - Movement for the Actor II—Mask

    Semester Hours: 2
    Fall, Spring
    Further applied study of the performer’s physical communication through mask. The course uses physical improvisation and exploration to assist the performer with character development.

    Prerequisite(s)/Course Notes:
    DRAM 031 . No liberal arts credit. Materials fee. May not be taken on a Pass/D+/D/Fail basis.



  
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    DRAM 033 - Movement for the Actor III — Advanced Movement Techniques

    Semester Hours: 2
    Fall
    A study of physical movement for period settings, physical comedy, and auditioning. Physical exploration and examination designed to render the body more effective in performance in classical theatre through contemporary theatre as well as in comedic performance.

    Prerequisite(s)/Course Notes:
    DRAM 031 , 032 . No liberal arts credit. May not be taken on a Pass/D+/D/Fail basis.



  
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    DRAM 034 - Movement for the Actor IV—Stage Combat

    Semester Hours: 2
    Fall, Spring
    Study in performing safe and effective stage combat techniques. The course is an applied focus on the actor’s physical, vocal, and emotional approach to performing violent action for stage and screen.

    Prerequisite(s)/Course Notes:
    DRAM 031 , 032  or permission of the instructor. No liberal arts credit. May not be taken on a Pass/D+/D/Fail basis. Weapons maintenance fee.



  
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    DRAM 034A - Basic Stage Combat

    Semester Hours: 2
    Fall, Spring
    The safe and effective performance of violent action for stage and screen. Emphasis on hand-to-hand combat and safe handling of basic weaponry.

    Prerequisite(s)/Course Notes:
    DRAM 059  or 059A  or permission of instructor. No liberal arts credit. May not be taken on a Pass/D+/D/Fail basis. Weapons maintenance fee.



  
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    DRAM 035 - Introduction to Laban Movement Analysis

    Semester Hours: 2
    Periodically
    A systematic study of Laban Movement Analysis (LMA) describing concepts and principles of human movement, including an overview of the Bartenieff Fundamentals, which are both a movement technique and an integrative tool for reeducating the body. The course will help students further develop the mental focus and emotional responsiveness necessary for both the dancer and the actor. It will also examine the principles of LMA as they apply to dance choreography, acting, and pedagogy.

    Prerequisite(s)/Course Notes:
    This course is designed for dance and drama  students. Same as DNCE 035 . May not be taken on a Pass/D+/D/Fail basis. No liberal arts credit.



  
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    DRAM 054 - Stage Management

    Semester Hours: 2
    Fall
    The organization, planning and operation of a theatrical production. Topics include basic management skills, rehearsal processes and scheduling, company management, prompt scripts, cast and crew management, production scheduling, design and production meetings and basic budgeting methods.

    Prerequisite(s)/Course Notes:
    No liberal arts credit. May not be taken on a Pass/D+/D/Fail basis.



  
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    DRAM 055 - Rehearsal and Production-Theater

    Semester Hours: 0.5
    Fall, Spring
    Required of the department major. Practice in all phases of theatrical production in connection with regular mainstage departmental presentations. Up to 3 semester hours may be applied to any degree.

    Prerequisite(s)/Course Notes:
    Pass/D+/D/Fail grade only. Open to the general student body. No liberal arts credit. (Formerly Rehearsal and Performance –Theater.)



  
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    DRAM 056 - Rehearsal and Performance—Theater

    Semester Hours: No credit
    Fall, Spring
    Practice in all phases of rehearsal and performance of theatrical production in connection with regular mainstage departmental presentations.

    Prerequisite(s)/Course Notes:
    Pass/D+/D/Fail grade only. Open to the general student body. No liberal arts credit.



  
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    DRAM 059 - Fundamentals of Acting I

    Semester Hours: 3
    Once a Year
    Basic acting techniques arranged to provide students with continuing guidance in the development of their abilities.

    Prerequisite(s)/Course Notes:
    Drama major or permission of instructor. (Formerly Fundamentals of Acting.



  
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    DRAM 059A - (CP) Acting Laboratory I

    Semester Hours: 3
    Once a Year
    Exploration of the basic techniques of stage performance, introduction to major contemporary approaches.

    Prerequisite(s)/Course Notes:
    Non-drama majors only. Same as DRAM 059 . (Formerly Acting Workshop.)



  
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    DRAM 060 - Fundamentals of Acting II

    Semester Hours: 3


    Once a year
    Basic acting techniques arranged to provide students with continuing guidance in the development of their abilities.

    Prerequisite(s)/Course Notes:
    DRAM 059 , drama major  only and permission of instructor. (Formerly Fundamentals of Acting.)

     



  
  
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    DRAM 078 - (CP) Theater Design Fundamentals: Methods and Materials

    Semester Hours: 3
    Spring
    An exploration of the process of theatrical design. Dramatic script analysis and conceptualization in visual terms. Historic period research within the context of design for the theater. Practical study of basic methods and materials used to graphically depict designs for the theater.

    Prerequisite(s)/Course Notes:
    Specific design materials required. Limited enrollment.



  
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    DRAM 100 - Departmental Honors Candidacy: Essay

    Semester Hours: 3
    Fall, Spring
    The research and writing of a substantial honors essay, the writing of a full-length play or a performance project with a strong accompanying written component.

    Prerequisite(s)/Course Notes:
    A substantial honors essay consists of 10,000 words at a minimum, or the writing of a full-length play or a performance project with a strong accompanying written component consists of 7,500 words at a minimum.  If a directing project is chosen, DRAM 190  must have been completed and the student must have taken or be concurrently enrolled in DRAM 155 . Open to qualified senior majors who desire to graduate with departmental honors. Approval of the chairperson and an adviser is required.



  
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    DRAM 103 - Senior Practicum

    Semester Hours: 1-3
    Fall, Spring
    Presentation and execution of a creative project in any aspect of theatrical art.

    Prerequisite(s)/Course Notes:
    Open only to senior BFA Theater Arts  and BA Drama majors  or by special permission of the departmental chairperson. Written permission of an adviser who will supervise the project must be presented at registration.



  
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    DRAM 110 A-Z - Special Topics in Drama

    Semester Hours: 1-4


    Seminars on selected aspects of theater: study of movements, ideas, individual artists and playwrights or exploration of significant performance or production techniques such as mime, Commedia dell’arte, constructivism, touring theater.

    Current Special Topics

    DRAM 110C Dangerous Ideas

    Each week a faculty member from a different department will explore a concept that has shaped human experience across time and space. The course is available only on a pass/D+/D/fail basis.

    Ideas matter. Concepts such as cultural identity, the meaning of food, democracy, faith, race, freedom, gender, have inspired social movements, shaped ways of life and political systems, and dramatically influenced the lives of individuals. Scientific ideas (such as evolution, species extinction, climate science) and skepticism about science also have power to shape our lives. Powerful ideas can be dangerous, generating turmoil and destabilizing the status quo, or supporting the status quo when change is needed, or creating unanticipated consequences.

    No prerequisites. There is no required reading for the course, but attendance is required.

    A student may register for any of the cross-listed sections (they are all one and the same course): ANTH 188K, DRAM 110C, PHI 051D, PSC 154B, RELI 141F, RHET 187F.

    DRAM 110D (01), CRN 93593: To Life! Jewish Experience and Identity on Stage

    The transcendent Yiddish production of Fiddler on the Roof closed in New York in January 2020, after a successful two-year run, 56 years after the path-breaking musical first opened on Broadway. This show’s striking, sustained popularity and acclaim is but one example of the powerful impact of Jewish lives, history, experience and identities on mainstream and experimental performance of the 20th and 21st centuries in the US. In this course, we will first trace the history of Jews in the US and explore how different genres of theatre and performance reflect the idea of “Jewishness” and evolving, multiple Jewish identities. By spotlighting the work of Jewish American theatre artists – performers, playwrights, composers, designers, and directors – and analyzing a variety of plays, we will gain an understanding of how theater resists and/or creates cultural stereotypes, and how, through performance, alliances can be forged with other shifting identity categories – including race, class, gender and sexuality.
    Cross-listed with JWST 090B (93882).

    Prerequisite(s)/Course Notes:
    May be repeated for credit when topics vary. Specific titles and course descriptions for special topics courses are available in the online class schedule. (Formerly 110.)



  
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    DRAM 112 A-Z - Advanced Special Topics in Drama

    Semester Hours: 1-3


    Periodically
    Intended primarily for students who have had previous background in subjects under discussion. Closer study of aspects of dramatic literature, theater history or performance and production skills.

    Prerequisite(s)/Course Notes:
    Junior class standing or permission of instructor or chairperson. May be repeated for credit when topics vary.Specific titles and course descriptions for special topics courses are available in the online class schedule. (Formerly 112.)

     



  
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    DRAM 115 - Independent Studies

    Semester Hours: 0.5-3
    Periodically
    Research, production or performance work on subject of advanced or special interest resulting in a substantial essay, major project or public performance. Offers opportunity for experienced drama major to pursue individual research or exploration under faculty supervision.

    Prerequisite(s)/Course Notes:
    Permission of chairperson and adviser. Not open to freshmen or sophomores. May be repeated for credit when topics vary.



  
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    DRAM 133 - History of Clothing

    Semester Hours: 3
    Every Other Year
    History of Western costume from the ancient Greeks to the beginning of the 21st century. Research methods, basic costume silhouette and style of each period, plus an overview of the most comment garments worn. Emphasis given to the information most commonly needed by a theatrical costume designer. Costume styles examined within historical context.

    Prerequisite(s)/Course Notes:
    DRAM 003  or permission of instructor. Materials fee additional. May not be taken on a Pass/D+/D/Fail basis.



  
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    DRAM 150 - Theater Today

    Semester Hours: 3
    Periodically
    Phenomena of the theater off- and off-off-Broadway. The new plays, playwrights and theater innovation will be covered. The approach is sociological, critical and evaluative. Attendance at performances in the New York area will be required.

    Prerequisite(s)/Course Notes:
    Not open to freshmen. Separate materials fee for theater attendance required.



  
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    DRAM 155 - Advanced Production Laboratory I

    Semester Hours: 3
    Fall
    Intended primarily for the production major. Special problems in production and training for technical direction. Students are given a variety of responsible positions in connection with regular departmental presentations. Rehearsal and production calls beyond regular class hours.

    Prerequisite(s)/Course Notes:
    DRAM 005  and permission of instructor. May be repeated once for credit. No liberal arts credit. (Formerly Advanced Production Workshop.)



  
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    DRAM 156 - Advanced Production Laboratory II

    Semester Hours: 3
    Spring
    Intended primarily for the production major. Advanced stage lighting, special techniques and laboratory experimentation. Students are given a variety of responsible positions in connection with regular departmental presentations. Rehearsal and production calls beyond regular class hours. 

    Prerequisite(s)/Course Notes:
    DRAM 005  and permission of instructor. May be repeated once for credit. No liberal arts credit. (Formerly Advanced Production Workshop.)



  
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    DRAM 163 - Seminar in Theater Style I

    Semester Hours: 3


    Once a year
    Theoretical approaches to both dramatic genre and period as sources of theatrical styles and their relationships to the work of the actor, director, designer. Students may be subject to call beyond regular class hours.

    Prerequisite(s)/Course Notes:
    Open to senior drama  and theater arts  majors only. (Formerly Seminar in Theater Style.)

     



  
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    DRAM 164 - Seminar in Theater Style II

    Semester Hours: 3


    Once a year
    The integration of independent research in these areas with theatrical demonstration. Students may be subject to call beyond regular class hours.

    Prerequisite(s)/Course Notes:
    DRAM 163 ; open to senior theater arts  majors only. (Formerly Seminar in Theater Style.)

     



  
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    DRAM 165 - Acting: Characterization and Scene Study

    Semester Hours: 3
    Scene study workshop concentrating primarily on plays of the 19th to 21st centuries; explorations in structuring and shaping a role with truthful interaction, clear intention and emotional commitment on stage.

    Prerequisite(s)/Course Notes:
    DRAM  , 060 , Theatre Arts Performance majors only.



  
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    DRAM 166 - Acting: Performing in the Plays of Shakespeare

    Semester Hours: 3
    Once a year
    Examination of Shakespeare’s language through sonnets and scenes; application of text analysis and fundamental acting technique to verse speaking and to life experience from a different milieu.

    Prerequisite(s)/Course Notes:
    DRAM 059 , 060 , 165  and permission of instructor. (Formerly Acting: Characterization and Scene Study.)



  
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    DRAM 166A - (CP) Shakespeare Workshop

    Semester Hours: 3


    Analyzing and acting Shakespeare’s works by exploring sonnets, scenes, and monologues.

     

    Prerequisite(s)/Course Notes:
    DRAM 059 or 059A.

    BA Drama majors and minors only or by permission from the instructor.



  
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    DRAM 167 - Acting as a Profession

    Semester Hours: 1-3
    Fall

    Advanced workshop in building the skills needed for a professional career in acting. The class is arranged whenever possible around the specialties of a visiting artist, and features guest lectures by a wide array of working artists and professionals.

    Prerequisite(s)/Course Notes:
    Senior BFA  degree candidates of permission of instructor.



  
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    DRAM 168 - Repertory Theater

    Semester Hours: 3
    Spring
    Advanced work in skills which support a professional career in acting. Arranged whenever possible around the specialties of a visiting professor or artist.

    Prerequisite(s)/Course Notes:
    Open only to Junior BFA Theater Arts majors with a concentration in Performance or by permission of instructor. Studio fee additional.



  
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    DRAM 169 - Acting for Television and Film

    Semester Hours: 3
    Spring
    Techniques used in acting for the camera. Processes that differ from those used in stage acting. Extending the range of the student actor to include electronic and film media. Scene study, and appropriate projects assigned. Students are subject to rehearsal and production calls beyond class hours.

    Prerequisite(s)/Course Notes:
    Junior and senior BFA  students or permission of instructor. No credit for both DRAM 169 and 169A . Studio fee additional.



  
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    DRAM 169A - Acting for the Camera

    Semester Hours: 3
    Periodically
    This course focuses on the processes and techniques used in preparing and acting for the camera. Individual and group scene study and single- and multi-camera production techniques are combined with critical text analyses for the student interested in developing a comfort and familiarity with acting for film, television, and the web. For students planning to work as actors, this course provides insights into working with directors and within a “camera” environment. For students planning to work behind the camera, this course provides useful insights for working with actors. Substantive written critical evaluations are required. Students are subject to rehearsals and production calls beyond class hours.

    Prerequisite(s)/Course Notes:
    DRAM 059  and 060  or 059A  and 060A , or permission of instructor. Same as RTVF 090 . No credit for DRAM 169  and 169A. (Formerly 169; Acting for Television and Film.)



  
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    DRAM 173 - (AA) History of the Drama I

    Semester Hours: 3
    Once a year
    Lines of development in the creation of the great dramatic literature of the West, intensive reading of the principal playwrights from Aeschylus to Sheridan.

    Prerequisite(s)/Course Notes:
    WSC 001 , 002  and passing the Writing Proficiency Exam.



  
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    DRAM 174 - (AA) History of the Drama II

    Semester Hours: 3
    Once a year
    Lines of development in the creation of the great dramatic literature of the West, intensive reading of the principal playwrights from Aeschylus to Sheridan.

    Prerequisite(s)/Course Notes:
    WSC 001 , 002  and passing the Writing Proficiency Exam.



  
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    DRAM 175 - (AA) Modern Drama I

    Semester Hours: 3
    Once a year
    Trends in drama related to social and literary forces of the late 18th to late 19th centuries, plays from 1780 to 1895.

    Prerequisite(s)/Course Notes:
    WSC 001 , 002  and passing the Writing Proficiency Exam.



  
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    DRAM 176 - (AA) Modern Drama II

    Semester Hours: 3
    Once a year
    Trends in contemporary drama related to social and literary forces of the late 19th to 21st centuries, plays from 1895 to the present.

    Prerequisite(s)/Course Notes:
    WSC 001 , 002  and passing the Writing Proficiency Exam.



  
  
  
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    DRAM 190 - Play Directing

    Semester Hours: 3
    Fall
    The steps – conceiving, casting, coaching, rehearsing, etc. – whereby a theatrical representation is translated from the director’s conception of the play. Students are subject to rehearsal and production calls beyond regular class hours.

    Prerequisite(s)/Course Notes:
    DRAM 003  or 009 .



  
  
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    DRAM 198 - Showcasing the Actor

    Semester Hours: 0


    Spring

    This is an advanced acting seminar culminating in performing in the BFA Senior Showcase. Students will use the showcase as a springboard for a career as an actor. 
     



  
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    DRAM 199 - Internship in Drama/Theater Arts

    Semester Hours: 0.5-3
    Fall, Spring, January, Summer
    This course allows students to expand their knowledge of theater in a professional setting.

    Prerequisite(s)/Course Notes:
    Drama or theater arts majors or minors only, and permission of the department chairperson. Minimum GPA of 2.5. Interns are required to work a minimum of 28 hours on-site during the semester for each semester hour of credit and perform a minimum of 10 hours of academic work per semester hour, including reading, research, and a term paper or final project, or the student must document the relevance of their work experience with response papers or journal, and/or a demonstration or presentation for a faculty adviser. Grades will be based on both on-site evaluation and academic work. An on-site evaluation of “poor” will result in a grade no higher than a C. May not be taken on a Pass/D+/D/Fail basis. May be repeated once for a total of up to six credits.




Economics (ECO)

  
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    ECO 001 - Principles of Economics

    Semester Hours: 3
    Fall, Spring, Summer
    Introduction to economic concepts and doctrines, followed by an extended analysis of the impact of the Keynesian revolution on the government’s role in the economy, its effects on economic stability, on growth and on social problems such as poverty.

    Prerequisite(s)/Course Notes:
    Credit given for ECO 1 or 007 , not both. ECO 1 is not a prerequisite for ECO 002 .



  
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    ECO 002 - Principles of Economics

    Semester Hours: 3
    Fall, Spring, Summer
    Examination of the market economy emphasizing oligopoly, income distribution followed by an analysis of special problems arising out of international trade.

    Prerequisite(s)/Course Notes:
    ECO 001  is not a prerequisite for ECO 2.



  
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    ECO 007 - (BH) Explorations of Current Economic Issues

    Semester Hours: 3
    Periodically
    Introduces key concepts of economics through detailed exploration of topics at the center of economic and political debate: economic growth and income distribution; proper role of government in our “mixed” economy; globalization of economic activity; strategic role of financial institutions and markets in the new world economy.

    Prerequisite(s)/Course Notes:
    Credit for ECO 001  or 7, not both.



  
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    ECO 010 - (BH) Economics, Environment and Community

    Semester Hours: 3
    Periodically
    Examination of the issues of natural resource limits, the ongoing quest and needs for economic growth, threats to environmental sustainability from over-exploitation of resources and environmental pollution, and a variety of economic and social policies designed to mitigate adverse human impacts on resource and environmental systems.

    Prerequisite(s)/Course Notes:
    May not be taken as one of the elective courses in economics required for the economics major .



  
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    ECO 012F - First-Year Seminar

    Semester Hours: 3
    Fall
    This course gives first-year students the opportunity to work in a seminar format with a member of the faculty in an area of the faculty member’s research interests.

    Prerequisite(s)/Course Notes:
    The course is open to first-year students only. Topics vary by semester. Consult the class schedule for proper category listing. Students may take only one 12F or 12S seminar.



  
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    ECO 012S - First-Year Seminar

    Semester Hours: 1-3
    Spring
    This course gives first-year students the opportunity to work in a seminar format with a member of the faculty in an area of the faculty member’s research interests.

    Prerequisite(s)/Course Notes:
    The course is open to first-year students only. Topics vary by semester. Students may take only one 12F or 12S seminar.



  
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    ECO 014F - First-Year Seminar

    Semester Hours: 3-4
    Fall

    This course gives first-year students the opportunity to work in a seminar format with a member of the faculty in an area of the faculty member’s research interests.

    Prerequisite(s)/Course Notes:

    The course is open to first-year students only. Topics vary by semester. This course is offered for distribution credit; consult the Semester Planning Guide for proper category listing. Students may take only one 14F or 12F seminar and only one 14S or 12S seminar.



  
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    ECO 014S - First-Year Seminar

    Semester Hours: 3-4
    Spring

    This course gives first-year students the opportunity to work in a seminar format with a member of the faculty in an area of the faculty member’s research interests.

    Prerequisite(s)/Course Notes:

    The course is open to first-year students only. Topics vary by semester. This course is offered for distribution credit; consult the Semester Planning Guide for proper category listing. Students may take only one 14F or 12F seminar and only one 14S or 12S seminar.



  
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    ECO 080 - Mathematical Methods in Economics

    Semester Hours: 3
    Once a year

    The course introduces students to mathematical concepts and methods that play a central role in contemporary economics.  Although the emphasis is on the development of students’ mathematical competence, the course will highlight applications of mathematical techniques to aspects of economic theory selected by the instructor.  Topics covered include basic algebra, calculus, and matrix algebra. 

    Prerequisite(s)/Course Notes:
    ECO 001, ECO 002, MATH 050 or instructor’s permission.  Should be taken by majors as soon as possible after ECO 001 and ECO 002.  (Formerly ECO 180 - Mathematical Methods in Economics.)



  
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    ECO 100 - Departmental Honors Candidacy: Essay

    Semester Hours: 3
    Fall, Spring
    Research for and the writing of a substantial essay in the field of economics.

    Prerequisite(s)/Course Notes:
    Open only to senior economics major  who are eligible for and desire to graduate with departmental honors. Students should start work and develop a formal proposal under supervision of a faculty adviser in the semester preceding their registration for ECO 100. Written permission of the adviser and department chairperson required prior to registration. Students must defend the honors essay by the last day of classes before a committee including the adviser and two additional faculty members.



  
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    ECO 101 - Introduction to Economics

    Semester Hours: 3
    Periodically
    This course is an intensive and combined study of undergraduate micro- and macro-economics. It assumes no prior knowledge of economics and starts with an introduction of basic economic concepts. The first part of the course focuses on the way in which prices and distribution are determined in a free market economy. Short and long-run costs of firms, pricing, in competitive, monopolistic and oligopolistic markets are among the issues discussed. The second part of the course then turns to the economy as a whole, focusing on the Keynesian revolution and the role of government in a free market economy. Banking system, central banking, money creation are among the issues discussed in this part along with economic growth and problems of international trade.



  
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    ECO 110 - (BH, CC) Economics of Latin America

    Semester Hours: 3
    Periodically
    A survey of modern Latin American economics. Examines post-independence export-led development and the turn to import-substitution industrialization. Evaluates the critique of import-substitution, and examines the debt crisis of the 80s and the rise of neoliberal policies in the 80s and 90s. Evaluates the consequences of trade liberalization, financial liberalization, privatization, and trade integration. Attention given to the various contemporary responses to perceived failures of neoliberalism.

    Prerequisite(s)/Course Notes:
    One introductory course in economics.



  
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    ECO 111 - Economic Development in Sub-Saharan Africa

    Semester Hours: 3
    Periodically
    Development theories, practices and results evident in the region’s primary industries such as agriculture, pastoral farming, mining and manufacturing from the colonial period to the present. Precolonial socioeconomic formations in each country within the region are examined as background to transformations fostered by colonialism.

    Prerequisite(s)/Course Notes:
    One introductory course in economics. Same as AFST 111 .



  
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    ECO 112 - Economic Development of China

    Semester Hours: 3
    Periodically
    Analysis of several industrialization strategies adopted by the Chinese after 1949 and shifts in ideology and social policy that have accompanied them. Some 19th and early 20th century economic history helps to understand present problems.

    Prerequisite(s)/Course Notes:
    One introductory course in economics.



  
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    ECO 114 - Japan’s Modern Economy

    Semester Hours: 3
    Periodically
    Historical background of the late 19th century to World War II. Structural characteristics of the contemporary economy; industrial organization, banking and finance, labor market. Role of government and macroeconomic policies. Economic, social and cultural factors in growth. Japan and the world economy.

    Prerequisite(s)/Course Notes:
    One introductory course in economics.



  
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    ECO 115 - Economics of European Integration

    Semester Hours: 3
    Periodically
    This course will examine the post-war history of European integration, including the customs, economic, monetary, and political union, and the common market, as well as specific policies like monetary and fiscal coordination in a single-currency area, competition policy, common agricultural policy, the significance of the euro, and EU enlargement.

    Prerequisite(s)/Course Notes:
    One introductory course in economics. (Formerly Economy of Western Europe.)



  
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    ECO 116 - (BH) Economics of the Middle East

    Semester Hours: 3
    Periodically
    Contemporary economy of the Middle East in its sociopolitical and historical contexts. Focus is on the post-World War II period: population, industrialization, oil, economic implications of militarization, growing religious fervor, revolution and rising instability.

    Prerequisite(s)/Course Notes:
    One introductory course in economics.



  
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    ECO 117 - (CC) Women and Development in the Middle East

    Semester Hours: 3
    Periodically
    Examination of the impact of economic development on gender in contemporary Middle Eastern countries. Factors such as social in contemporary Middle Eastern countries. Factors such as social division of labor in the family, fertility, education, employment, occupational segregation, and discrimination are studied within the broader socioeconomic and culture context of the Middle East.

    Prerequisite(s)/Course Notes:
    At least two semesters of social sciences and/or women’s studies, or instructor’s approval.



  
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    ECO 118 - Political Economy of Turkey

    Semester Hours: 3
    This is an interdisciplinary course focusing on the nation of Turkey, and exploring the conflicts in Turkish society between modern and traditional, secular and religious, and rich and poor. Particular attention is paid to the young and dynamic nature of the country, and classes cover a broad range of topics examining Turkey’s history and its modern political structure. Among the topics to be studied are, the attempts over the past two hundred years to modernize Turkey, the social and political conflicts these attempts have generated, the domestic and international political difficulties the country is faced with, and the nature of its recent economic problems. Required readings are drawn from a variety of sources and disciplines in the social sciences.

    Prerequisite(s)/Course Notes:
    Same as PSC 118 .



  
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    ECO 120 - (BH, CC) African Labor Economics

    Semester Hours: 3
    Periodically
    Work, working people and working class movements in modern Africa are the focus of this introductory course. Through contemporary and historical cross-country studies of workers in a wide variety of economic, political and institutional settings, we will evaluate rival perspectives on a host of interesting and controversial topics. These include changing occupational and industrial formations, gender and racial/ethnic gaps in jobs and income, poverty and inequality, immigration, urban informal employment, worker training and health care, labor unions, government’s regulatory and job creation roles. This is a distribution course in both the Behavioral Social Sciences and the Cross-Cultural categories.

    Prerequisite(s)/Course Notes:
    One introductory economics course, or LABR 001A  or instructor’s  permission. Credit given for ECO 120, LABR  120  or AFST 120 .



  
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    ECO 121 - (BH) Economics of Discrimination

    Semester Hours: 3
    Periodically
    An inquiry into the distribution of income and wealth, with emphasis on opportunities and returns of minority groups, the economics of discriminatory practices, alternatives in providing greater equity and welfare to victims of discrimination.

    Prerequisite(s)/Course Notes:
    One introductory course in economics.



  
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    ECO 125 - Monetary Economics

    Semester Hours: 3
    Periodically
    Forms and functions of money; theories of money demand and supply; the relation between monetary aggregates, credit conditions and economic activity in the different models; the role of central banking; domestic and international aspects of monetary policy.

    Prerequisite(s)/Course Notes:
    ECO 001 , 002 .



  
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    ECO 130 - Microeconomic Behavior and Institutions

    Semester Hours: 3
    Spring
    In-depth survey of key aspects of microeconomics, including neoclassical and behavioral theories of choice; analysis of institutions governing the coordination of economic activities; and analysis of competition and cooperation among individuals and organizations.

    Prerequisite(s)/Course Notes:
    ECO 001 , 002 ; MATH  061  or 071 . (Formerly Intermediate Microeconomics.)



  
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    ECO 131 - Government and Business

    Semester Hours: 3
    Fall, Spring, Summer
    Public policy toward business, government powers and private rights, the structure of industrial markets, regulation of competition and monopoly, economic aspects of the antitrust laws.

    Prerequisite(s)/Course Notes:
    ECO 002 .



  
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    ECO 132 - Intermediate Macroeconomics

    Semester Hours: 3
    Once a year
    Theory; GNP and its limitations; components of aggregate demand; monetary and fiscal policy; analysis of inflation, unemployment and growth.

    Prerequisite(s)/Course Notes:
    ECO 001 , 002 . Prerequisite or corequisite: MATH 040 .



  
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    ECO 133 - (BH) Health Economics

    Semester Hours: 3
    Once a Year
    This course applies general theoretical principles of economics to the health care sector. The basic approach is to recognize the importance of scarcity and incentives, allowing for differences peculiar to health. The demand and supply of health and medical care are examined as they involve physicians, nurses and hospitals. The competitiveness of their markets, health insurance and the role of government are explored. Special topics include regulation and planning, benefit-cost analysis, and reform health plans

    Prerequisite(s)/Course Notes:
    ECO 002 ; MATH 008  or BAN 001 ; or permission of instructor.



  
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    ECO 136 - Public Finance and Fiscal Policy

    Semester Hours: 3
    Periodically
    Expenditures and revenues of federal, state and local governments; analysis of effects upon private enterprise and public welfare; fiscal policy in relation to equity, stability, growth and defense.

    Prerequisite(s)/Course Notes:
    One introductory course in economics.



  
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    ECO 137 - Transnational Enterprise in World Economy

    Semester Hours: 3
    Periodically
    Origins, organization, magnitude and scope of private and state-owned TNE’s. Neoclassical, managerial and radical theories of the transnational firm. Evaluation of the market and nonmarket including political, behavior of TNE’s and their socioeconomic impact on both advanced capitalist and socialist economics, and the underdeveloped nations of the Third World. Case studies from agribusiness, minerals and fuels, manufacturing and financial sectors. Public policy.

    Prerequisite(s)/Course Notes:
    One introductory course in economics.



  
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    ECO 139 - Economic History of Europe

    Semester Hours: 3
    Every other year
    The changing economic framework of European institutions and cultures studied in selected pivotal periods such as the 11th-12th, 14th-15th and 17th-19th centuries.

    Prerequisite(s)/Course Notes:
    One introductory course in economics or HIST 011 , 012 . Same as HIST 139 .



  
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    ECO 140 - Economic History of the United States

    Semester Hours: 3
    Every other year
    Trends and patterns in the production, distribution and consumption of material wealth that mark the economic development of the United States from colonial times to the 20th century. These matters are subjected to economic analysis, but are also seen in relation to changing social and political institutions and moral values.

    Prerequisite(s)/Course Notes:
    One introductory course in economics or HIST 013 , 014C . Same as HIST 140 .



 

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