Sep 27, 2022  
2020-2021 Graduate Studies Bulletin 
    
2020-2021 Graduate Studies Bulletin [ARCHIVED BULLETIN]

Biology Courses


Biology

Courses

Biology (BIO)

  •  

    BIO 200 - Computer Utilization in Biological Research


    Semester Hours: 3
    Periodically
    Lectures and laboratory experiences concerning the use of Geographic Information Systems in a multidisciplinary context, with specific applications in natural sciences (e.g., biology, geology) and applied sciences (e.g., engineering). Hands-on laboratory exercises with current software to provide practical experience in editing, integration, geocoding, display and analysis of spatial and non-spatial data through multilayered maps using data from various sources. Emphasis will be given to case studies such as remote sensing, mapping important resources, home range analysis, and vegetation patterns for land use planning, environmental impact studies, asset management, and transportation engineering. Students will be expected to work on an independent project, analyzing a substantial data set relevant to the theory and techniques covered in class.



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    BIO 201 - Statistical Analysis of Biological Data


    Semester Hours: 4
    Periodically
    Practical application of statistical techniques to the analysis of data typically encountered by researchers in the life and health sciences. Students learn practical and intuitive approaches to choosing statistical techniques appropriate for particular experimental designs. Parametric statistical tests covered include single and two-way ANOVA, regression and correlation. Tests of “messy” or nonparametric data are considered as well, including analysis of frequencies and substitutions for ANOVA (2 hours lecture, 1 hour recitation).



  •  

    BIO 202 - Laboratory/Research Techniques for K-12 Biology Teachers


    Semester Hours: 3
    Summer
    This course is designed to help K-12 school teachers develop either cell/molecular or ecology/evolution research methods classes and inquiry-driven laboratory experiences for their students. The course will introduce teachers to model systems that can be applied to research and inquiry-based laboratories. Model organisms, subject matter, and targeted school level may change with separate offerings of this course. Course content will include the basic biology of the organisms and an introduction to the types of research for which the organisms are currently being used. Techniques that can be used for inquiry-driven investigations will be introduced. In the second half of the course, class participants will work in groups to design new experiments or avenues of investigation.

    Prerequisite(s)/Course Notes:
    The course may be repeated for credit when the model systems covered change. May not be taken on a Pass/Fail basis.



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    BIO 203 - Advanced Field Ecology


    Semester Hours: 3
    Periodically
    This course includes lectures, laboratory and field experiments, and field trips to selected geographic regions and/or habitats. Areas of study include techniques of specimen collection, preservation, identification, field data collection and analysis, and students will gain experience with tools and electronic equipment commonly used in field ecological studies. Comparative studies of terrestrial plants and animals in the field are stressed. An independent research project will be designed, carried out, and reported by each student. This course is recommended for students considering ecological field research.

    Prerequisite(s)/Course Notes:
    An undergraduate course in general ecology; permission of instructor. Fee varies depending on location and content of course.



  •  

    BIO 204 - Advanced Coastal Marine Biology


    Semester Hours: 3
    Periodically
    An intensive, field-oriented course covering the biological, chemical, geological and physical features of coasts and seas. Lectures and field work emphasize the taxonomy, ecology and behavior of marine species from habitats such as coral reefs, mangroves, mudflats, rocky shores, salt marshes and sandy beaches. Students will employ sampling techniques to study factors that influence the abundance and distribution of marine species. Primary scientific literature will be used to critically evaluate the ecological role and adaptations of species in the major habitats of the selected geographic region for the course.

    Prerequisite(s)/Course Notes:
    Permission of instructor. Fee varies depending on location and content of course.



  •  

    BIO 205 - Marine Microbiology


    Semester Hours: 3
    Spring
    This course concerns morphology, physiology, ecology and distribution of marine and estuarine bacteria, algae, fungi, protozoa and other planktonic organisms. Biological corrosion, pollution, pathogenicity and economic significance of marine microorganisms will also be considered.

    Prerequisite(s)/Course Notes:
    Undergraduate courses in microbiology, cell biology or biochemistry, or permission of instructor.



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    BIO 206 - Foundations of Modern Biology for Middle- and High-School Biology Teachers


    Semester Hours: 3
    Once a Year
    An in-depth consideration of the overarching concepts of modern biology for graduate students in biology-education programs. Basic unifying concepts in biology will be studied in an historical perspective to demonstrate how the process of science leads to scientific knowledge. Common misunderstandings of basic concepts will be explored. Students will develop activities for classroom and laboratory teaching of commonly misunderstood concepts. Emphasis will be placed on genetics, evolution, and ecology, and on inquiry-driven activities.

    Prerequisite(s)/Course Notes:
    SED 235 ; minimum GPA of 2.75. May not be taken for credit toward a BA or BS in biology. Permission of instructor and biology graduate program director required for credit toward MS  or MA  in biology.  May not be taken on a Pass/Fail basis.



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    BIO 207A - Biology of Fishes


    Semester Hours: 3
    Every Other Year
    Anatomy, systematics, biogeography, respiration, osmoregulation, buoyancy and sensory systems of marine and freshwater fishes. The course concludes with a discussion of the interactions between humans and fishes, including poisonous and venomous fishes and fisheries management and conservation.

    Prerequisite(s)/Course Notes:
    Undergraduate course work in comparative anatomy or marine biology, or permission of instructor.



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    BIO 208 - Biology of Mammals


    Semester Hours: 3
    Every Other Fall
    This course explores the biology, conservation, and management of terrestrial and marine mammal species in North America. Topics include distribution, physiology, behavior, commercial value, and viability of game and non-game species – from woodrats to whales. Physiology, behavior, and conservation will be discussed from an evolutionary perspective.



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    BIO 209 - Anatomy and Physiology for Medical Physics


    Semester Hours: 3
    Fall
    This course provides an understanding of basic human anatomy and physiology, with an emphasis on identification of anatomical structures of the major organ systems, using radiographic visualization techniques such as X-ray or CT images. Students will relate the various modalities used for diagnostic imaging to anatomical structure and physiological function.

    Prerequisite(s)/Course Notes:
    Open only to students enrolled in the MS program in medical physics  with a minimum GPA of 3.0 in course work in medical physics or permission of program director. May not be taken on a Pass/Fail basis. (Formerly Diagnostic Imaging in Human Anatomy and Physiology.)



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    BIO 210 - Advanced Genetics


    Semester Hours: 3
    Periodically
    This course concerns problems of modern genetics based upon the most recent research.

    Prerequisite(s)/Course Notes:
    A course in genetics or permission of instructor.



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    BIO 212 - Chromosome Biology


    Semester Hours: 3
    Periodically
    This course concerns the structure, function and behavior of chromosomes in eukaryotes, prokaryotes and viruses. Also considered are lampbrush and polytene chromosomes in differentiation, the mitotic apparatus, and the synaptonemal complex.

    Prerequisite(s)/Course Notes:
    A course in genetics or permission of instructor. May not be taken on a Pass/Fail basis.



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    BIO 213 - Current Topics in Genetics and Evolution


    Semester Hours: 3
    Once a Year
    A problem-based overview of biology for graduate students. Designed for students with little or no prior experience in biology course work, this course covers the basics of genetics, the function and manipulation of DNA, evolution, and ecology. Problems within each topic allow the student to understand the conceptual basis of the topic and obtain the skills needed to approach more complex issues.

    Prerequisite(s)/Course Notes:
    May not be taken for credit toward a BA or BS in biology, or MS  or MA  in  biology. Recommended for elementary education majors. May not be taken on a Pass/Fail basis.



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    BIO 217 - Biology of Birds


    Semester Hours: 4
    Periodically
    This course covers the biology of birds, including evolution, systematics, physiology, and behavior.  The laboratory portion emphasizes learning about the birds of Long Island and study of bird biology in the field. Occasional Saturday field trips occur.

    Prerequisite(s)/Course Notes:
    An undergraduate course in ecology and evolution, or permission of instructor. May not be taken on a Pass/Fail basis. Credit for this course or BIO 108, not both. Lab fee additional. (Formerly 3 s.h.)



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    BIO 220 - Endocrinology


    Semester Hours: 3
    Periodically
    The role of the major endocrine glands in controlling overall homeostasis will be addressed, focusing primarily on mammals. This course will take an integrative approach, highlighting the molecular and cellular events leading to proper functioning of the endocrine organs. In addition, the pertinent methodologies used in the field will be discussed.

    Prerequisite(s)/Course Notes:
    An undergraduate course in cell biology or permission of instructor.



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    BIO 225 - Principles of Systematic Biology


    Semester Hours: 3
    Periodically
    This course is devoted to the study of the diversity and evolution of living organisms. The theory and practice of biological systematics, from the description of new species to the reconstruction of the phylogenetic relationships of higher taxonomic groupings, will be presented. Current topics in systematics will be explored utilizing primary scientific sources. Students will learn computer programs for phylogenetic reconstruction and will complete an analysis of their chosen taxonomic group.

    Prerequisite(s)/Course Notes:
    An undergraduate course in evolution or permission of instructor. No credit for BIO 225 if BIO 122 is on undergraduate transcript.



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    BIO 227 - Behavioral Ecology


    Semester Hours: 4
    Every Other Year

    This course reviews the fundamental principles of behavioral ecology, and explores current topics receiving particular attention in the field, including, but not limited to, parental care, parent-offspring conflict, sexual selection, sperm competition and mating systems, resource exploitation, foraging strategies, life history strategies, cooperation and sociality. Students will learn laboratory and field techniques used in behavioral ecology, formulate hypotheses, design and carry out original experiments in the laboratory component of the course, write a formal lab report and take field trips to observe animal behavior in natural habitats.  Students will also use both text and primary literature to develop an in depth knowledge of experimental design and theory of behavioral ecology in the context of current trends and controversies in the field. Students will research and introduce current primary literature to the class and will write a grant proposal (3 hours lecture, 3 hours lab, per week).

    Prerequisite(s)/Course Notes:
    No credit for Bio 227 if Bio 117 is on undergraduate transcript. Credit given for this course or BIO 253A, Special Topics in Behavioral Ecology, not both. (Formerly BIO 253A Special Topics in Behavioral Ecology.)



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    BIO 228 - Advanced Organismal Biology


    Semester Hours: 2-4
    Periodically
    Lectures and laboratories will explore advanced topics in organismal biology. Students will critically analyze findings in the primary scientific literature on the ecology and evolution of selected taxa. Specific topics vary by semester.

    Prerequisite(s)/Course Notes:
    A course in general ecology, evolution; or permission of instructor. May be repeated for credit when topics vary. May not be taken on a Pass/Fail basis.



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    BIO 230 - Plant Ecology of Long Island and Adjacent Areas


    Semester Hours: 4
    Periodically
    Taught in the field and in the lab, dealing primarily with organisms encountered on the field trips. Emphasis on field observation, laboratory study, identification and ecology of plants on Long Island and adjacent areas.

    Prerequisite(s)/Course Notes:
    Introductory general biology course sequence which included introductory botany or ecology. May not be taken on a Pass/Fail basis. Lab fee additional.



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    BIO 231 - Fungi of Long Island and Adjacent Areas


    Semester Hours: 4
    Periodically
    Fieldwork is expected as emphasis is on study of fungi from collected samples. Isolation, culture and identification are an integral part of course work.

    Prerequisite(s)/Course Notes:
    Introductory general biology course sequence which included a survey of eukaryotic diversity.



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    BIO 233 - Applied and Environmental Microbiology


    Semester Hours: 4


    Periodically.

    This course will introduce graduate students to traditional microbiology and molecular methods as they are applied to problems related to environmental microbiology and microbial biotechnology. In class, students will discuss concepts and current scientific literature on how microbial ecology tools can be used in environmental microbial research. The laboratory portion of the course will include labs in field work, environmental sample collection, training in classic microbiology, molecular techniques and microbial genomic analyses. 

    Prerequisite(s)/Course Notes:
    An undergraduate course in microbiology or permission of instructor. Credit given for this course or BIO 132, not both.  Lab fee additional. (Formerly, BIO 253 A-B)



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    BIO 234 - Experimental Molecular Biology


    Semester Hours: 4
    Periodically
    This laboratory-intensive course provides students with a solid foundation in practical basic and advanced molecular biological techniques, including their theory and applications to biological and medical research. Students gain skills in nucleic acid isolation and characterization and protein expression techniques, as well as fundamental bioinformatics tools. Genomic approaches and current advances in molecular techniques are also explored through a series of hands-on projects, presentations, and readings from the primary scientific literature.

    Prerequisite(s)/Course Notes:
    One semester undergraduate organic chemistry and at least one of the following courses: upper-level undergraduate genetics, cell biology, or biochemistry. May not be taken on a Pass/Fail basis. Lab fee additional. (2 hours lecture, 4 hours laboratory each week.)



  •  

    BIO 235 - Hormones and Behavior


    Semester Hours: 3
    Spring
    This course provides a foundation for understanding current issues in endocrinology by focusing on hormone effects on behavior. This is accomplished through exploration of the evolutionary trajectory of hormones and investigation of their effects across various taxa.  

    Prerequisite(s)/Course Notes:
    Undergraduate course work in physiology and animal diversity, or permission of instructor.  May not be taken on a Pass/Fail basis.



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    BIO 236 - Microbial Pathogenesis


    Semester Hours: 3
    Periodically
    The mechanisms of pathogenesis by which cellular microbes invade animal and plant hosts will be explored principally through the analysis of primary literature. Emphasis will be on human bacterial pathogens, although important protist and fungal pathogens will be discussed. Topics include, but are not limited to, pathogen colonization, immune evasion, toxin production and action, biofilms and quorum sensing, and the role of normal microflora in disease prevention.

    Prerequisite(s)/Course Notes:
    Undergraduate course work in microbiology or permission of instructor. May not be taken on a Pass/Fail basis.



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    BIO 237 - Biochemical Mechanisms in Cell Biology


    Semester Hours: 3
    Periodically
    This course covers recent research concerning the biochemical mechanisms involved in regulating various processes in cell biology. Selected advanced topics may include: transcellular signaling, vesicle traffic, quality control of protein synthesis, protein translocation, nuclear transport, extracellular matrix, cytoskeletal function and G-protein function. Students analyze recent reviews and journal articles from the primary literature.

    Prerequisite(s)/Course Notes:
    An undergraduate course in cell biology or genetics, or permission of instructor. May not be taken on a Pass/Fail basis.



  •  

    BIO 238 - Advanced Cell Biology


    Semester Hours: 4


    Periodically

    Once thought to be the purview only of cell and molecular biologists, molecular and cellular methods are now commonly used to solve problems in all sub-disciplines of biology, including conservation, ecology and physiology. Discussion and application of the methods used during the study of membrane trafficking and cell signaling in human cell culture.  Topics include CRISPR-Cas9 genome editing, RNA interference, protein structure and function, mechanisms of protein regulation, protein trafficking and expression, and cell signaling. This course provides training in industry-applicable techniques like ELISA (enzyme-linked substrate immunosorbence assay) and confocal immunofluorescence microscopy. Students will design independent experimental projects while developing scientific writing and presentation skills. Extensive critical reading of primary literature is required.  (1 hour lecture, 5 hours lab.)

    Prerequisite(s)/Course Notes:
    An undergraduate course in cell biology or biochemistry is strongly recommended. Students will be expected to work in teams and complete some experimental protocols outside of regularly scheduled class sessions. Lab fee additional.



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    BIO 240 - Virology


    Semester Hours: 3
    Periodically
    This course concerns molecular and clinical aspects of viruses that infect humans, including replication, gene expression, changes in host cells, pathogenesis, and transmission. Particular attention is paid to Human Immunodeficiency Virus – the cause of AIDS.

    Prerequisite(s)/Course Notes:
    An undergraduate course in cell biology or genetics, or permission of instructor.



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    BIO 242 - Molecular Medicine


    Semester Hours: 3
    Once a Year
    In this course, primary and secondary sources are used to learn about human disease pathology and intervention at the molecular level. Specific diseases covered each semester vary and only two or three broad categories of disease are typically considered each semester (for example, metabolic syndrome, neurodegenerative diseases, and autoimmune diseases). In addition to exploring human disease at a molecular level, this course is also designed to help students become proficient in reading, synthesizing and writing about scientific literature.

    Prerequisite(s)/Course Notes:
    Undergraduate courses in cell biology and genetics, or permission of the instructor. May not be taken on a Pass/Fail basis. (Formerly BIO 253A, Special Topics in Biology: Molecular Medicine.)



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    BIO 243 - Advanced Developmental Biology


    Semester Hours: 3
    Periodically
    A study of the morphological events that occur during embryogenesis, combined with an investigation of the cellular and molecular mechanisms that underlie these events. Included are in-depth investigations of a number of animals that have become standard models for studies in developmental biology. Students are required to prepare individual or group-based oral presentations.

    Prerequisite(s)/Course Notes:
    A background in cell biology and genetics or permission of instructor. May not be taken on a Pass/Fail basis.



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    BIO 244 - Biology of the Cancer Cell


    Semester Hours: 3
    Periodically
    This course concerns various aspects of cancer cell biology on the histological, cellular and molecular levels. Emphasis is on basic research problems including cancer as a misprogramming of normal development, alterations in cell-cell recognition, changes in nuclear events, the oncogene theory, and the mechanisms of action of chemical carcinogens.

    Prerequisite(s)/Course Notes:
    An undergraduate course in genetics and either cell biology or biochemistry, or permission of instructor.



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    BIO 250 - Advanced Parasitology


    Semester Hours: 4
    Spring

    This course emphasizes current research on the diversity, ecology, life cycles, host pathology, and control of parasites. Through primary scientific literature students will explore parasites that infect man as well as host/parasite relationships of species infesting a range of invertebrate and vertebrate hosts. Students are required to complete a review paper on a focused topic in parasitology that pertains to their thesis research. In the laboratory, students learn techniques to isolate, identify, and investigate representative species. (3 hours lecture, 3 hours laboratory.)

    Prerequisite(s)/Course Notes:
    A course in general ecology and/or organismal biology; or permission of instructor. No credit for BIO 250 if BIO 150 is on undergraduate transcript.



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    BIO 251B - Special Topics in Biology


    Semester Hours: 2-4
    Fall, Spring
    Seminar course on selected readings or presentations on the development of the great areas and philosophies and current literature in selected fields of biology. Oral and/or written reports at seminar sessions may be required.

    Prerequisite(s)/Course Notes:
    May be repeated for credit when topics vary.



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    BIO 251C - Special Topics in Biology


    Semester Hours: 1-4
    Fall, Spring
    Independent study course on specific areas and philosophies and current literature in selected fields of biology not covered in other courses.

    Prerequisite(s)/Course Notes:
    May be repeated for credit when topics vary.



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    BIO 253A - Special Topics in Biology


    Semester Hours: 2-4
    Fall, Spring
    Lectures and seminars on special advanced topics in biology. Emphasis is on subjects of current investigation, the scientific literature, and theoretical and philosophical aspects of research.

    Prerequisite(s)/Course Notes:
    May be repeated for credit when topics vary.



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    BIO 254 - Insect Biology


    Semester Hours: 4
    Periodically
    Through lectures, labs and field excursions, students will examine insect structure, physiology, ecology, life histories, behavior, and the impact of insects on humans. Students will be required to complete an in-depth study of some topic covered in class and present their findings both in a written paper, and orally to the class. Furthermore, they will be expected to prepare an insect collection (3 hours lecture, 3 hours lab).

    Prerequisite(s)/Course Notes:
    Credit for this course or BIO 154, not both. The course may require field trips outside of regularly scheduled class sessions. May not be taken on a Pass/Fail basis. Lab fee additional.



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    BIO 255 - Current Topics in Genetics


    Semester Hours: 3
    Periodically
    This course covers recent research in genetics. Students are required to read, understand and discuss primary research articles in genetics and are evaluated on the basis of preparation, participation and understanding of the material. 

    Prerequisite(s)/Course Notes:
    A course in genetics and permission of instructor. (Formerly Seminar: Current Topics in Genetics, 2 s.h.)



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    BIO 264 - Scanning Electron Microscopy


    Semester Hours: 3
    Periodically

    Students will learn fundamental operation and use of scanning electron microscopy, including instruction in tissue preparation, critical point drying, image preparation and analysis. Each student completes an independent research project using the electron microscope, writes up the work in the form of a manuscript and presents the findings to the class. (1 hour lecture, 3 hours laboratory).

    Prerequisite(s)/Course Notes:
    Permission of instructor.  Credit given for Bio  264 or 264A. Lab fee additional. (Formerly BIO 264A)



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    BIO 270 - Physiological Ecology and Functional Morphology of Aquatic Vertebrates


    Semester Hours: 3
    Periodically
    This course covers how fish, aquatic amphibians, reptiles, and birds interact with the environment. The primary focus of the course is fish. It uses an interdisciplinary approach encompassing the areas of anatomy, function, physiology and ecology. Particular attention is given to the way these vertebrate groups overcome problems associated with aquatic life.

    Prerequisite(s)/Course Notes:
    An undergraduate course in vertebrate anatomy or physiology, or permission of instructor. May not be taken on a Pass/Fail basis.



  •  

    BIO 273 - Genomics and Bioinformatics


    Semester Hours: 4
    Periodically
    Large-scale, genome-wide studies produce vast amounts of biological data (e.g., DNA and protein sequences, 3-D structures, and changes in gene expression). The fields of genomics and bioinformatics apply computational tools and skills to how these data are stored, accessed, manipulated, and most importantly, used to answer biological questions related to, for example, evolution, population dynamics, and gene expression. In this course, students will learn, by completing an advanced genomics project, how genome-scale data are generated and analyzed using bioinformatics tools and databases. Students will also lead discussions of the applications of genomics and bioinformatics to medicine, evolution, and biomedical research.

    Prerequisite(s)/Course Notes:
    An undergraduate course in genetics or molecular biology and permission of instructor. Credit given for this course or BIO 173 or CSC 121 or BIO 213 .



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    BIO 275 - Advanced Conservation Biology


    Semester Hours: 3
    Periodically
    This course reviews the basic topics in conservation biology and considers, in detail, advanced topics. Topics include the origin and measurement of genetic species and ecosystem biodiversity, ancient and contemporary extinction processes, species and ecosystem management, and the political and economic aspects of biodiversity preservation. Students use computer simulations to compare strategies for managing and restoring endangered species and ecological communities (2 hours lecture, 1 hour recitation).



  •  

    BIO 280 - Molecular Ecology


    Semester Hours: 3
    Periodically
    Molecular techniques are now instrumental in a wide range of applications from conservation biology to evolutionary ecology. Students will explore the types and applications of molecular genetic tools to investigate ecological processes, from tracking individuals and monitoring within population variation, to large-scale analysis of community composition. The majority of the course will focus on discussions of the primary literature, supplemented by short lectures, textbook readings, and computer-based analysis and problem sets. The class will include a multi-week simple molecular ecology laboratory exercise designed to demystify the basics of molecular bench work.

    Prerequisite(s)/Course Notes:
    Lab fee additional. (Formerly BIO 253A: Special Topics in Biology: Molecular Ecology.) May not be taken on a Pass/Fail basis.



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    BIO 281 - Conservation Genetics


    Semester Hours: 3
    Periodically
    Conservation genetics focuses on themes such as: the loss of genetic variation in small populations, the effects of inbreeding, the genetic management of threatened species, and the contributions of molecular genetics to conservation. This course covers the conceptual background necessary for understanding the importance of genetic diversity in the avoidance of species extinctions. Students will learn about genetic diversity and allele and genotype frequencies and how to apply these concepts to understanding population evolution and species management. Complementing the theoretical aspects of the course will be methods for assessing and describing genetic diversity, and for assessing the risk of extinction of populations of plants and animals.

    Prerequisite(s)/Course Notes:
    At least one undergraduate course in genetics. May not be taken on a Pass/Fail basis.



  •  

    BIO 282 - Advanced Marine Biology


    Semester Hours: 4


    Fall or Spring 

    This course focuses on the study of marine organisms and their adaptations to habitats ranging from the intertidal to the deep sea. Students will explore the biological, chemical, and physical principles that influence the ecology of marine species and communities. Each student will complete a review on a current topic in marine biology and present their findings to the class. In the laboratory component, students investigate the biology of marine species through field work and lab studies. (3 hours lecture, 3 hours laboratory.)

    Prerequisite(s)/Course Notes:
    Course is offered once every two years. A course in general ecology and/or organismal biology; or permission of instructor. No credit for BIO 281 if BIO 181 is on undergraduate transcript.



  •  

    BIO 301 - Master’s Thesis


    Semester Hours: 3
    Fall, Spring
    Laboratory and library research.

    Prerequisite(s)/Course Notes:
    Permission of instructor. Recommend taking BIO 201  prior to or at the same time.



  •  

    BIO 302 - Master’s Thesis


    Semester Hours: 3
    Fall, Spring
    Laboratory and library research. Includes a public oral presentation and examination.

    Prerequisite(s)/Course Notes:
    BIO 301 ; permission of instructor. Recommended prerequisite or corequisite: BIO 201 . Upon completion, students must submit their Hofstra University master’s thesis online through the Axinn Library Serials Office.



  •  

    BIO 303 - Master’s Essay


    Semester Hours: 3
    Fall, Spring
    Library-based research paper comprising a critical review of scientific literature on a selected topic. The thesis portion is the student’s own evaluation of the topic. Course includes a public oral presentation and examination.

    Prerequisite(s)/Course Notes:
    Permission of instructor. Recommended prerequisite or corequisite: BIO 201 . Upon completion, students must submit their Hofstra University master’s thesis online through the Axinn Library Serials Office.



  •  

    BIO 305 - Graduate Seminar


    Semester Hours: .5
    Fall, Spring
    A broad range of research topics in the biological sciences are discussed in weekly seminars. Presentations are made by invited speakers.

    Prerequisite(s)/Course Notes:
    May not be taken on a Pass/Fail basis. Course may be repeated once for a total of 1.0 semester hour.



  •  

    BIO 307 - Internship in Biology


    Semester Hours: 1-3
    Fall, Spring, Summer
    Intensive work to enable the student to develop practical expertise in the field.

    Prerequisite(s)/Course Notes:
    Admission to the concentration. Students may choose from a large selection of participating facilities including (but not limited to) a neighboring institution, a museum, or a zoological park/aquarium. (Formerly Internship in Marine or Freshwater Biology.)