Apr 21, 2024  
2022-2023 Undergraduate Bulletin 
    
2022-2023 Undergraduate Bulletin [ARCHIVED BULLETIN]

Course Descriptions


 

English (ENGL)

  
  
  
  
  • ENGL 108 - (LT) Re-Coding Literature: Introduction to Digital Humanities

    Semester Hours: 3 s.h.


    Periodically

    This course explores the promise and limitations of using computing and digital technologies to undertake and present literary analysis.  Topics may include data visualization, text encoding and text analysis, digital archives and digital editions, humanities gaming, and digital storytelling.  This course introduces digital tools as well as humanistic questions concerning aesthetics, ethics, access and inclusion raised by the use of such tools.  Students will encounter those digital tools as they analyze literary texts. 

    Prerequisite(s)/Course Notes:
    WSC 001  or WSC 002 .



  
  • ENGL 109 - Examining Narrative Medicine

    Semester Hours: 3-4
    Periodically

    Narrative Medicine is designed to foster critically engaged empathy in a clinical setting. The field draws on literature, film, media, philosophy and the clinical sciences to enable clinicians to recognize, absorb, metabolize, interpret, and be moved by the stories of illness.  Through closely examining such texts, students will develop an understanding of the role of narrative in the clinical setting as well as an appreciation of narratives about medicine.  Students will write papers that demonstrate close reading, the ability to read texts against one another, and/or to apply theoretical material to narrative texts.  Reading will include literature, theoretical texts and reflective work by physicians. 

    Prerequisite(s)/Course Notes:
    WSC 001  or WSC 002 . Same as WSC 109 .  May not be taken on a Pass/D+/D/Fail basis.  Credit given to this course or WSC 109 , not both.



  
  
  
  • ENGL 113 - (LT) Inventing Identities: Yeats, Heaney, and the Emergence of Modern Irish Poetry

    Semester Hours: 3
    Periodically

    This course deals with the significant work of Irish poets writing in English during the modern period. The course begins with the work of W.B. Yeats, who was writing at a critical moment in Irish history, and who exercised an influence on world literature. The study of texts by Yeats and other prominent Irish poets, such as Seamus Heaney, enables students to develop an understanding of both the nature of an aesthetic work and the critical tools that can be brought to its appreciation.

    Prerequisite(s)/Course Notes:
    WSC 001  or WSC 002 . Same as IRE 113 .



  
  
  
  
  
  
  • ENGL 119 - Milton: Literature, Liberty, Revolution

    Semester Hours: 3
    Fall, Spring
    An examination of Milton’s poetry and prose. Attention is given to such issues as the persona he constructs, his representations of kingship and revolution, and his treatments of marriage and gender. Students come to appreciate some of the literary forms, poetic conventions, and religious, social and political traditions to which Milton was responding and from which he was departing.

    Prerequisite(s)/Course Notes:
    WSC 001  or WSC 002 . (Formerly Milton.)



  
  • ENGL 120 - (LT) British Drama from 1660 to 1789

    Semester Hours: 3
    Periodically

    This course examines the many shifts and transformations in British drama from the Restoration through the 18th century. Dramatists of the period drew upon innovations in theatrical architecture, set design, scenery, lighting, music, and sound to transform their plays into spectacular, sometimes outrageous, events that explored topics such as politics, urban life, religious conflict, gender relations, and class warfare.  Readings may include plays by William Wycherley, George Ethredge, Aphra Behn, William Congreve, John Gay, Oliver Goldsmith, and Richard Sheridan. 

    Prerequisite(s)/Course Notes:
    WSC 001  or WSC 002 . (Formerly English Drama from 1660 to 1789.)



  
  • ENGL 121 - (LT) The Novel Before 1900

    Semester Hours: 3
    Fall, Spring
    The development and variety of the novel form from its beginnings in the 18th century through the 19th century, the great age of the novel. Representative of the major novelistic traditions of those centuries in England, America, France, and Russia, examples studied may include such works as Tom Jones, Frankenstein, Jane Eyre, Moby Dick, Madame Bovary, and The Brothers Karamazov.

    Prerequisite(s)/Course Notes:
    WSC 001  or WSC 002 . (Formerly Studies in the Novel I.)



  
  • ENGL 122 - The Novel: 1900 to the Present

    Semester Hours: 3
    Fall, Spring

    This course investigates the range of novel forms in the 20th and 21st centuries, including works by major writers such as Henry James, E.M. Forster, William Faulkner, James Joyce, Virginia Woolf, Ralph Ellison, Toni Morrison, Margaret Atwood, Chinua Achebe, Kazuo Ishiguro, and Ian McEwan.

    Prerequisite(s)/Course Notes:
    WSC 001  or WSC 002 . (Formerly Studies in the Novel II and The Novel after 1900.)



  
  
  
  • ENGL 125 - (LT) Psychology, Cognitive Science, and Literature

    Semester Hours: 3
    Periodically
    This course explores the interrelations between psychology and literature.  Questions to be considered may include the following: Why and how does the mind spontaneously produce and respond to stories?  How do metaphors guide thinking?  Why do readers care about fictional characters?  Readings may include poems by Walt Whitman and William Wordsworth and short stories or novels by Nathaniel Hawthorne, Philip Roth, Eudora Welty, Jamaica Kincaid, Richard Wright, and Roald Dahl.

    Prerequisite(s)/Course Notes:
    WSC 001  or WSC 002 . Credit given for this course or ENGL 198T, not both. (Formerly ENGL 198T, Readings in Literature or Special Studies: Literature and Psychology: Narrative Selves.)



  
  
  • ENGL 127 - Shakespeare’s Comedy

    Semester Hours: 3
    Periodically
    Comedy is a dramatic structure in which the reversal of fortune goes from bad to good, and moves toward the resolution of social conflicts through recognition, union, and reunion. For Shakespeare, this means the formation of a new society out of a flawed one, through the institutions of class and marriage. This class will trace that idea through several of Shakespeare’s so-called “Comedies” written at various points in his career, with an eye toward investigating both the “romantic” and “anti-romantic” interpretations of these works.

    Prerequisite(s)/Course Notes:
    WSC 001  or WSC 002 .



  
  • ENGL 128 - (LT) British Gothic Fiction and Modern Horror

    Semester Hours: 3 s.h.


    Periodically

    This course examines how British Gothic fiction, often set in the hidden chambers and subterranean passages of foreboding castles, brings repressed tales of subjugation to light and thus critiques oppressive political regimes, systematic injustices, and tyrannical parental figures.  Course texts may include:  Horace Walpole’s The Castle of Otranto; Jane Austen’s Northanger Abbey; Mary Shelley’s Frankenstein; Ann Radcliffe’s The Italian, or the Confessional of the Black Penitents; Emily Bronte’s Wuthering Heights; Rebecca du Maurier’s Rebecca; and Neil Gaiman’s Coraline.  This course will also explore how the gothic genre has been adapted into films such as Black Swan and Ex Machina. 

    Prerequisite(s)/Course Notes:
    WSC 001  or WSC 002 . Credit given for this course or ENGL 194B, not both. (Formerly ENGL 194B, British Gothic and Modern Horror.)

     



  
  • ENGL 129 - (LT) The 18th Century

    Semester Hours: 3
    Fall, Spring
    Typically short, frequently satirical works in prose and verse from the later 17th century to 1800, the period when emerging middle- and lower-class kinds of literature challenged traditional aristocratic kinds. The flourishing of such genres as mockepic, periodical essay, biography, and novel, and of such major authors as Dryden, Defoe, Swift, Pope, Johnson, Boswell, and Blake.

    Prerequisite(s)/Course Notes:
    WSC 001  or WSC 002 .



  
  
  
  
  • ENGL 136 - Beat Generation

    Semester Hours: 3
    Periodically
    This course will introduce students to the culture of conformity of American postwar society and examine the rebellion against it by the poets and novelists of the Beat Generation, writers such as Allen Ginsberg, Jack Kerouac and William Burroughs. We will examine why these writers were dissatisfied during such an affluent time in America, why they chose to rebel against the dominant ideas and values, and how this rebellion shaped revolutionary new forms of writing.

    Prerequisite(s)/Course Notes:
    WSC 001  or WSC 002 . (Formerly 182J.)



  
  
  
  • ENGL 139 - (LT, CC) The African Novel

    Semester Hours: 3
    Fall, Spring

    Introduces selected African novelists of the 20th century such as Chinua Achebe, Sembene Ousmane, Ayi Kwei Armah, Ngugi wa Thiong’o, Bessie Head, Buchi Emecheta and Solomon Mutswairo. Analysis of African literary themes, such as traditional and modern conflicts, resistance to colonialism, effects of independence, neocolonial dilemmas and images of the African woman.

    Prerequisite(s)/Course Notes:
    WSC 001  or WSC 002 . Same as AFST 139 .



  
  • ENGL 140 - African American Literature Before 1920

    Semester Hours: 3
    Fall, Spring
    The origins of an African American literary tradition from the Colonial period to the early 20th century. Themes include the African Diaspora, slavery, folk culture, race, and social equality. Such authors as Equiano, Wheatley, Douglass, Brown, Jacobs, Harper, Washington, and Du Bois.

    Prerequisite(s)/Course Notes:
    WSC 001  or WSC 002 . Credit given for this course or AFST 140 , not both. (Formerly African American Literature I.)



  
  • ENGL 141 - (LT) African American Literature: The Harlem Renaissance and After

    Semester Hours: 3
    Fall, Spring
    The growth of African American literature from the Harlem Renaissance to the present. Such topics as migration, African heritage, protest, vernacular, and gender. Writers include Hughes, Hurston, Wright, Brooks, Ellison, Baldwin, Baraka, Walker, Morrison, and Wilson.

    Prerequisite(s)/Course Notes:
    WSC 001  or WSC 002 . Credit given for this course or AFST 141 , not both. (Formerly African American Literature II.)



  
  • ENGL 142 - The American Renaissance, 1820-1860

    Semester Hours: 3
    Periodically
    A study of a period in American literary history so rich, it as been called “the American Renaissance.” Works by such authors as Emerson, Thoreau, Melville, Poe, Hawthorne, Douglass, Stowe, Whitman and Dickinson. The development of a distinctively American literature is studied in the context of the revolutionary changes and deep conflicts that characterized American life in this period.

    Prerequisite(s)/Course Notes:
    WSC 001  or WSC 002 .



  
  
  
  • ENGL 147A - American Fiction, 1950-Present

    Semester Hours: 3
    Periodically

    This course explores how fiction since WWII engages the complex cultural challenges structuring the Cold War and post-Cold War periods, such as: the rise of neoliberalism, increasing globalization, identity formation, and the climate crisis. Assigned writers may include Vladimir Nabokov, Thomas Pynchon, Don DeLillo, Toni Morrison, Ralph Ellision, Joyce Carol Oates, and Octavia Butler.

    Prerequisite(s)/Course Notes:
    WSC 001  or WSC 002 .



  
  
  
  
  • ENGL 151 A-Z - Special Topics: Major Authors

    Semester Hours: 3


    This course explores the works of either one author or two significantly related authors who have contributed to literature written in English. The authors studied will vary.

    Current Special Topics

    CRWR 151A, Fiction: Major Authors: Jane Austen

    Jane Austen turned her brilliantly observant eye on her contemporary world:  England in the early 1800s.  Fusing savage wit with eloquent prose, she sets up characters who seek to wield power through barely veiled cruelty to justifiable ridicule, and she also writes movingly about characters who refuse to make moral compromises in order to rise in status.  Within her contemporary world, as Austen depicts it, desires are intensely felt, but are forced to give way to pragmatic considerations—therefore, romantic love, in her novels, is almost never earned or expressed without the knowledge gained through self-reflection or loss.  As we read Austen’s fiction, we will explore the literary and cultural contexts in which her writing emerged, as well as the constructs of gender, sexuality, and inherited privilege that she opened to incisive critique.  The readings for this course will include Lady Susan, a short novel in which a woman boldly pursues her own sexual pleasure and power without apology or regrets; Pride and Prejudice, a novel in which a man who has totally repressed his desires finds himself “bewitched” by a young woman who couldn’t care less whether he lives or dies; Sense and Sensibility,  in which one woman’s descent into madness is answered by another woman’s cultivation of reason and self-mastery; Emma, a radical contrarian novel in which a rich young woman decides never to marry in order to rule over her self-created world; and Persuasion, in which an oppressive familial and class structure finally breaks down, allowing marriage between a woman and man, who recognize each other as equals, to take place.  Throughout the course, we will also screen and discuss a number of film and television adaptations of Austen’s work, including Amy Heckerling’s film Clueless and the most recent film version of Emma, directed by Autumn de Wilde, which was released in 2020.    This is a Writing Intensive course and it fulfills a Pre-1900 Literature requirement and the Major Author requirement in the Creative Writing Concentration.

    Prerequisites: WSC 001. May not be taken on a Pass/D+/D/Fail basis. 

     

    Prerequisite(s)/Course Notes:
    WSC 001  or WSC 002 . May not be taken on a Pass/D+/D/Fail basis.  As individual authors are selected, each is assigned a letter (A-Z) which is affixed to the course number. Specific titles and course descriptions for special topics courses are available in the online class schedule



  
  • ENGL 152 - Literary Perspectives on Children’s and Young Adult Literature

    Semester Hours: 3
    This course examines children’s literature by bringing to bear theories and approaches to narrative and genre that illuminate issues of class, gender, ethnicity, colonialism, disability and other topics of concern to both children and adults. The class pays special attention to the concepts, values and assumptions about childhood and adolescence held by authors, audiences, publishers, and critics and to how these conceptions influence the aesthetic qualities, ethical concerns, and narrative techniques evident in this important body of work.

    Prerequisite(s)/Course Notes:
    WSC 001  or WSC 002 . May not be taken on a Pass/D+/D/F basis.  Credit given to this course or ENGL 198W, not both. May not be taken on a Pass/D+/D/Fail basis. (Formerly, ENGL 198W)



  
  
  
  • ENGL 155 - (LT) Childhood and Adolescence in Literature

    Semester Hours: 3
    Periodically
    This course examines representations of the child and young adult in literature in order to explore the ways in which they revise, complement, contradict, or illuminate our notions of childhood and, implicitly, ourselves. Topics may include: the invention of childhood, the idealization or demonization of children and young adults, the child’s perspective as a medium of critique, and childhood and fantasy. Readings may include Songs of Innocence and Experience, Huckleberry Finn, Alice in Wonderland, Little Women, The Wonderful Wizard of Oz, and Tar Beach.

    Prerequisite(s)/Course Notes:
    WSC 001  or WSC 002 .



  
  • ENGL 156 - The Bible as Literature

    Semester Hours: 3
    Periodically
    The aim of this course is to view the Bible as, firstly, a major work of literature and history, and secondly, as a major sourcebook of myth, story, metaphor, and images that have shaped Western literature and art. We will look at the impact of the Bible on English and American literature and explore it as the testing ground for modern theories of literary criticism. Along the way, we will take note of the original languages of the Bible, the art of translation, and some of the theological concepts that have given the Bible its distinctive place in literature and history.

    Prerequisite(s)/Course Notes:
    WSC 001  or WSC 002 . May not be taken on a Pass/D+/D/Fail basis.



  
  
  
  
  • ENGL 160 - Contemporary Literatures

    Semester Hours: 3


    Periodically

    This course explores diverse forms of and approaches to, recent literature written in English.  In addition to grappling with the term “contemporary,” the course will address topics such as the relationship of contemporary literature to earlier periods, engagement with current socio-political contexts, responses to climate change, and the status of the literary in relation to changes in technology, media, and markets.

     

    Prerequisite(s)/Course Notes:
    WSC 001  or WSC 002 .



  
  • ENGL 161 - (LT) How The Simpsons Saved American Literature

    Semester Hours: 3
    Periodically
    The Simpsons have explored, adapted and parodied many pieces of American literature.  The works studied (Huckleberry Finn, Citizen Kane, Who’s Afraid of Virginia Woolf, The Music Man, Wiseguys, Goodfellas, and The Natural, among others) examine the following themes in American literature: the roles of men and women, family values, heroes and role models, American ingenuity, the underdog and the outlaw, and success.

    Prerequisite(s)/Course Notes:
    WSC 001  or WSC 002 . (Formerly 192C.)



  
  • ENGL 162 - (LT) Law and Literature

    Semester Hours: 3
    Periodically
    Consideration of the interrelations of law and literature, especially of the ways law, lawyers, and trials have been represented in fiction. The course explores the ways literature illuminates how the rule of law may be compromised by corruption, incompetence, state power, ethnic and gender discrimination, and verbal craft. Works may include Antigone, The Merchant of Venice, Measure for Measure, Billy Budd, The Trial, The Crucible, and Twelve Angry Men.

    Prerequisite(s)/Course Notes:
    WSC 001  or WSC 002 .



  
  • ENGL 163 - (LT) Contemporary Irish American Literature and Culture

    Semester Hours: 3
    This course surveys Irish American literature, music and film in several distinct units, beginning with the history of the Irish in America and concluding with the contemporary Irish American mystique. We will examine the breadth of Irish American identity, from the Westies to JFK, and from F. Scott Fitzgerald to the Dropkick Murphys and Black 47.

    Prerequisite(s)/Course Notes:
    WSC 001  or WSC 002 . Same as IRE 163 .



  
  
  
  
  
  • ENGL 168 - (CC, LT) Caribbean Experience in Literature

    Semester Hours: 3
    Periodically
    An exploration of the literature of the English-speaking Caribbean (Antigua, Barbados, Belize, Guyana, Jamaica, St. Kitts, St. Lucia, and Trinidad). Emphasis is placed on the ways in which this literature deals with the experience of slavery, colonization, and independence and the ways in which it treats such issues and themes as regional identity, color, race, class, gender, and family relations. Attention is also given to the ways in which the literature and culture of the Caribbean makes use of such cultural elements as Carnival and vernacular Africanized English known as patois and creole.

    Prerequisite(s)/Course Notes:
    WSC 001  or WSC 002 . Same as AFST 168 .



  
  • ENGL 169 - (LT) Renaissance Pick-Up Artists

    Semester Hours: 3
    Periodically
    This course explores early modern English love poetry by Shakespeare and his contemporaries in England during the 16th and 17th centuries. Students study these poems in the context of pastoral and courtly love traditions and examine the relationship between English poems and their classical and medieval predecessors. Readings include poems by Thomas Wyatt, Philip Sidney, Edmund Spenser, Andrew Marvell, John Donne, Robert Herrick, Mary Wroth, Katherine Philips, John Wilmot, and Aphra Behn.

    Prerequisite(s)/Course Notes:
    WSC 001  or WSC 002 . (Formerly ENGL 184H, (LT) Readings in Literature or Special Studies: Renaissance Pick-up Artists – 16th and 17th Century Love Poems.)



  
  • ENGL 171 - The History of the Book

    Semester Hours: 3-4
    Once a Year
    This course introduces students to the cultural and material history of the book. Topics may include the technologies of book production, the development of manuscript, print, and digital cultures, the economics of the book trade, the establishment of copyright laws, the impact of reading, writing, and literacy on society, the role of libraries and universities in the dissemination of books and book learning, and the advent of modern editorial practices

    Prerequisite(s)/Course Notes:
    WSC 001  or WSC 002 . (Formerly The History of Publishing in America.)



  
  • ENGL 172 - Editing Fundamentals

    Semester Hours: 3
    Fall, Spring

    This course will instruct students in the practices that make up the complete process of editing a book: both copy and manuscript editing. Students will learn the processes of production editing and proofreading, the symbols used by proofreaders in the editing process, the proper way to use printer’s marks, and how to mark up a manuscript to make it ready for the printer. Oral presentation required.

    Prerequisite(s)/Course Notes:
    WSC 001  or WSC 002 . Students taking the Publishing Studies concentration must take ENGL 172.



  
  
  
  
  
  • ENGL 177A - Textbook Publishing

    Semester Hours: 3
    Periodically

    This course will instruct students in the categories within the textbook division–the various age levels and the fields of study–of a publishing house.  The course will emphasize to students the editorial practices essential to a clear presentation of information. Students will be instructed in the nature of marketing, distribution, and promotion. Students will edit one entire manuscript including copy editing, proofreading, design, and production. 

    Prerequisite(s)/Course Notes:
    WSC 001  or WSC 002 .



  
  • ENGL 178A - Literary Publishing

    Semester Hours: 3
    This course interrogates the art and business of publishing in multiple genres (fiction, poetry, and creative non-fiction) and media (commercial and independent-press books, literary magazines, and digital platforms).   Case studies illuminate the meaning and import of publication and what happens to texts once they are published.  Students follow a manuscript from inception to publication with attention to the roles of professionals (writers, agents, acquiring editors, international scouts, book reviewers, designers, publicists) who participate in that process.

    Prerequisite(s)/Course Notes:
    WSC 001 and ENGL 172.



  
  • ENGL 178D - Digital Publishing

    Semester Hours: 3
    This course explores the practices, issues, and opportunities digital technology has introduced into the publishing industry.  Discussions and readings address content acquisition and development, archiving and asset management, digital formats (e-books, digital downloads, digital audiobooks), the role of search engines, the content aggregator landscape, sales trends and  the analysis of  digital market, and challenges to traditional business models.  This course considers how digital media alter reading and writing as a cultural practices and publishing as a cultural forum. 

    Prerequisite(s)/Course Notes:
    WSC 001  or WSC 002 . Credit will be given for this course or ENGL 190X, not both.



  
  • ENGL 180 - (LT) The Outlaw in American Literature: An Irish-American Perspective

    Semester Hours: 3
    Periodically
    The hostile reception met by Irish immigrants arriving in America in the 18th and 19th centuries contributed to many of them becoming outlaws. Authors often cast outlaw narratives as romantic stories of rebels fighting oppression. Viewing the literature both in its historical context and through its present-day evaluations, this course endeavors to understand the beliefs, myths, and legends surrounding outlaws that constitute an important Irish contribution to American culture.

    Prerequisite(s)/Course Notes:
    Same as IRE 180 .



  
  • ENGL 181 - (LT) The Graphic Novel

    Semester Hours: 3
    Periodically
    This course examines the literary genre of the graphic novel, which, like all comics, juxtaposes words and images to convey a story, whether fiction or non-fiction. Graphic novels typically address complex and challenging issues and topics, such as violence, trauma, sexuality, gender, and race. We will look at the narrative techniques and forms specific to the genre and the broader history of comics and visual narrative in order to better understand the place of the graphic novel within that history. Works to be considered may include Maus, Persepolis, Fun Home, Watchmen, Jimmy Corrigan: The Smartest Kid in the World, A Contract with God, Blankets, and Ghost World.  

    Prerequisite(s)/Course Notes:
    WSC 001  or WSC 002 . (Formerly ENGL 196B)



  
  • ENGL 182 to 184 A-Z - Readings in Literature or Special Studies

    Semester Hours: 3
    Fall, Spring
    Each semester, the department offers several “special studies” courses. These courses deal with specific issues, themes, genres, and authors. Intensive study of major authors and/or literary themes. Subjects to be selected yearly.

    Prerequisite(s)/Course Notes:
    WSC 001  or WSC 002 . The topics of the “special studies” courses change every semester. Please consult the English Department Course Description Booklet for topics offered in a particular semester.



  
  • ENGL 185 - (LT) Revolutions: British Literature 1945 to the Present

    Semester Hours: 3
    Periodically

    An overview of British literature from the end of World War II to the present day. Texts will be examined against the backdrop of historical events such as postwar austerity, the end of the British Empire, the evolution of a multicultural Britain, and the “sexual revolution” of the 1960s. Authors may include Elizabeth Bowen, Phillip Larkin, Muriel Spark, Tom Stoppard, Harold Pinter, Angela Carter, Kazuo Ishiguro, Ian McEwan, and Andrea Levy, among many others.

    Prerequisite(s)/Course Notes:
    WSC 001  or WSC 002 .   (Formerly British Literature After 1945 and Revolutions: British Literature After 1945.)



  
  • ENGL 186 - (LT) Other Britons: The Literature of Multicultural Britain 1945 to the Present

    Semester Hours: 3
    Periodically
    An exploration of works by and about Britons of color since the end of World War II, with emphasis on issues of postcolonialism and postimperialism during the decades in which Britain has become a multiracial society. Authors may include Hanif Kureishi, Salman Rushdie, Buchi Emecheta, Zadie Smith, Kazuo Ishiguro, Andrea Levy, Monica Ali, Sam Selvon, E. R. Braithwaite, Helen Oyeyemi, and Caryl Phillips, among others.

    Prerequisite(s)/Course Notes:
    WSC 001  or WSC 002. [Formerly (LT) The Literature of Multicultural Britain and Other Britons: The Literature of Multicultural Britain.]



  
  • ENGL 187 - (LT) Modern British Literature

    Semester Hours: 3
    Periodically
    This course examines the response of modern British writers to the cultural, technological, social, sexual, political, and philosophical upheavals in Britain after the Victorian Age—that is, from the death of Queen Victoria (1902) to the start of World War II (1939). Readings may include works by British and Anglo-Irish authors such as W.B. Yeats, George Bernard Shaw, James Joyce, Virginia Woolf, E. M. Forster, T. S. Eliot, Elizabeth Bowen, W. H. Auden, and Evelyn Waugh, among others.

    Prerequisite(s)/Course Notes:
    WSC 001  or WSC 002 . (Formerly ENGL 198N)



  
  
  • ENGL 189 - Contemporary British Theater

    Semester Hours: 3
    January

    Students in this course read, study, discuss, and write about British and Irish theater since World War II. Among the playwrights to be studied are Samuel Beckett, Noel Coward, Tom Stoppard, Harold Pinter, David Hare, Alan Ayckbourn, Peter Shaffer, and George Bernard Shaw. Since the course is taught in London, class work is supplemented with five performances of contemporary plays and world theater classics (depending on what is being staged in London at the time). Additionally, the course includes tours of Shakespeare’s Globe and the Royal National Theatre. The course also introduces students to London as one of the major literary and dramatic capitals of the English-speaking world. The British Library is used as a major resource for literary research.

    Prerequisite(s)/Course Notes:
    WSC 001  or WSC 002 .  May be repeated once for credit. (Formerly ENGL 184G)



  
  • ENGL 190 A-Z - Special Studies in Literature

    Semester Hours: 1-3
    Fall, Spring
    Each semester, the department offers several “special studies” courses. These courses deal with specific issues, themes, genres, and authors. Intensive study of major authors and/or literary themes. Subjects to be selected yearly.

    Prerequisite(s)/Course Notes:
    WSC 001 . The topics of the “special studies” courses change every semester. Please consult the English Department Course Description Booklet for topics offered in a particular semester. (Formerly Readings in Literature or Special Studies.)



  
  • ENGL 191 - Internship

    Semester Hours: 1-6
    Periodically
    English majors and minors are encouraged to find, in not-for-profit groups as well as in for-profit organizations, internships in which they will apply skills learned in their English major or minor to work outside the academic setting.

    Prerequisite(s)/Course Notes:
    WSC 001  and prior approval by the department chairperson. A minimum GPA of at least 3.0 is required for student eligibility for participation in internship courses. A preliminary interview will be held with the student and the department chairperson or the faculty internship director to establish the nature of the academic work associated with on-site work of the internship. There will be a minimum of three meetings (one at the beginning of the internship, one around mid-term, and one at the end of the work experience). A minimum of 28 hours of on-site work per semester hour is required, accompanied by a minimum of 10 hours of academic work per semester hour—for example, reading, research, and a term paper or final project, to be determined by faculty adviser in conjunction with student. Final grade will be based on both academic and on-site performance. An on-site evaluation of “poor” will result in a final grade no higher than C. May be repeated for up to 6 s.h.; only 3 s.h. of ENGL 191 may be applied toward the minor in English  ; 6 s.h. may be applied toward the major in English . May not be taken on Pass/D+/D/Fail basis.



  
  
  • ENGL 192 A-Z - Special Studies in Literature

    Semester Hours: 3
    Fall, Spring
    Each semester, the department offers several “special studies” courses. These courses deal with specific issues, themes, genres, and authors. Intensive study of major authors and/or literary themes. Subjects to be selected yearly.

    Prerequisite(s)/Course Notes:
    WSC 001 . The topics of the “special studies” courses change every semester. Please consult the English Department Course Description Booklet for topics offered in a particular semester. (Formerly Readings in Literature or Special Studies.)



  
  • ENGL 193 - (LT) Medical Science Fiction

    Semester Hours: 3
    Periodically
    This course in science fiction focuses on medicine and the broader health and life sciences. Treating works ranging from early modern fiction to contemporary bestsellers, the course delves into our continuing fascination with healing and the definition of the human person. From its beginnings, medical science fiction has always asked challenging questions such as: What does it mean to be human? To be healthy? To be diseased? Is health care a right or a commodity? What is the role of disease presentation in natural selection? How does/should the medical profession respond to public fears about genetic engineering and mutation? Writers may include H G. Wells, Octavia Butler, Michael Crichton, Mary Shelley and William Gibson. 

    Prerequisite(s)/Course Notes:
    WSC 001 .



  
  • ENGL 194 A-Z - Special Topics: Junior/Senior Seminar

    Semester Hours: 3-4


    Fall, Spring
    Intensive consideration of critical issues in literary history and interpretation. Topics vary.

    Current Special Topics

    ENGL 194A, Jr/Sr Seminar: The Imaginary Museum: Art in Literature

    Ekphrasis is the evocative Greek term for “a detailed description of a work of visual art” in a literary text.   In this course, ”The Imaginary Museum: Art in Literature,” artworks make their appearance in works of literature in both expected and unexpected ways—namely, inside the galleries of real museums as well as in the galleries of wholly imaginary museums, whose collections of art are conjured up through the feverish dreams, projections, and musings of writers, artists, and other visionaries.  Our course readings will also take us into grand museums located in the art capitals of the world—the Metropolitan Museum of Art and the American Museum of Natural History in New York City, the National Gallery in London, and the Louvre in Paris–as well as off the beaten path to micro-museums consisting of a single artwork or of a solitary cabinet of curiosity filled with an eclectic array of art and artifacts.  With W.H. Auden’s poem “Musee des Beaux-Arts” serving as a point of departure, we will read a series of novels and novellas that cover a sweeping span of time, from the late nineteenth century up through the present day, and then further into an imagined, post-apocalyptic future,  including Oscar Wilde’s Portrait of Dorian Gray;  Vera Caspary’s Laura;  Daphne du Maurier’s Rebecca;  Rachel Pastan’s Alena; Jessie Burton’s The Miniaturist;  Brian Selznick’s Wonderstruck;  Margaret Atwood’s Cat’s Eye;  E.L. Konisburg’s From the Mixed-Up Files of Mrs. Basil E. Frankweiler; Tracy Chevalier’s Girl with A Pearl Earring;  and Emily St. John Mandel’s Station Eleven.   

    Prerequisite: WSC 001. Required course for English majors in the Literatures in English concentration.  May not be taken on a Pass/D+/D/Fail basis

    Prerequisite(s)/Course Notes:
    WSC 001 . Required course for English majors  in the Literatures in English concentration. May not be taken on a Pass/D+/D/Fail basis.  As individual subjects are selected, each is assigned a letter (A-Z) which is affixed to the course number. Specific titles and course descriptions for special topics courses are available in the online class schedule. (Formerly Junior/Senior Seminar.)



  
  
  
  
  • ENGL 196 A-Z - Readings in Literature or Special Studies

    Semester Hours: 1-3


    Fall, Spring
    Each semester, the department offers several “special studies” courses. These courses deal with specific issues, themes, genres, and authors. Intensive study of major authors and/or literary themes. Subjects to be selected yearly.

    Current Special Topics

    English 196N, Dreaming in Literature

    This course is cross-listed with FST 005B.

    If, as Bert States states, “dreaming is the ur-form of all fiction,” what can investigations into how and why we dream tell us about the nature, form, and function of literature?  Conversely, what can investigations into how and why we create literature tell us about the nature, form, and function of dreams and dreaming?  This course will draw on scientific research, literary theory, fiction, and poetry in order to explore how works of literature can illuminate the experience of dreaming and how theories about how and why we dream can illuminate literature.  While we focus on the relationship between dreaming and literary expression, we will discuss several related topics: play, ritual, religious experience, trance, lucid dreaming, and other forms of consciousness akin to dream states.

    Prerequisite(s)/Course Notes:
    WSC 001  or WSC 002 . The topics of the “special studies” courses change every semester. Please consult the English Department Course Description Booklet for topics offered in a particular semester.



  
  • ENGL 196D - (LT) Disability in Literature and Culture

    Semester Hours: 3
    Spring

    This course examines the representation of disability in Western literature and culture. The overriding concerns of the course will be with how the body’s shape and capacities have been assumed to determine character and fate, how physical and mental impairments have been used in literature to signify moral and psychological states, and how representation may challenge conventional conceptions of “normality” and “disability.” Literary texts from various periods will be supplemented with some nonliterary texts and documentary films.

    Prerequisite(s)/Course Notes:
    WSC 001  or WSC 002 . Same as DSST 002 .



  
  • ENGL 198 A-Z - (LT) Special Studies in Literature

    Semester Hours: 3


    Fall, Spring

    Each semester, the department offers several “special studies” courses. These courses deal with specific issues, themes, genres, and authors. Intensive study of major authors and/or literary themes. Subjects to be selected yearly.

    Current Special Topics

    ENGL 198Z (LT) Murder Most Foul

    A bloody crime scene. A blood-curdling scream. A lifeless corpse. Who is a murderer? Who is murdered? Who is the audience that is enjoying an irresistible story of a “good murder”? Long before the detective story became a genre, stories of murder have been popular. Why is this? What makes a murder story “good”? How can an old story be reimagined and become relevant in a new genre, historical era, and cultural context? These are some of the issues we will address as we delve into the theme of murder and how it has been used to entertain audiences in novels, plays, and movies.

    Prerequisite(s)/Course Notes:
    WSC 001  or WSC 002 . The topics of the “special studies” courses change every semester. Please consult the English Department Course Description Booklet for topics offered in a particular semester. (Formerly Readings in Literature or Special Studies.)



  

English as a Second Language (ESL)

  
  • ESL 001a - Introductory English Grammar, Reading, and Writing

    Semester Hours: 0
    This course is designed for non-native speakers of English with novice-low proficiency in reading and writing as defined by the ACTFL proficiency guidelines.  The course focuses on understanding key word and formulaic phrases across a range of highly contextualized texts, many related to college life.  The course will help students improve their vocabulary and understand predictable language, such as found on train schedules, maps, and signs.  Students will also derive meaning from short non-complex texts that convey basic information.  It will help students meet limited basic practical writing needs using lists, short messages, postcards, and simple notes.  Students will also learn how to recombine vocabulary and structures to create simple utterances on familiar (or rehearsed topics).  Through this course students will improve their reading and writing skills to the novice-high proficiency level.



  
  • ESL 001b - Introductory Listening and Speaking in English

    Semester Hours: 0
    This course is designed for non-native speakers of English with novice-low proficiency in listening and speaking (ACTFL).  In this course, students will learn to successfully manage uncomplicated communicative tasks in predictable social situations.  Students will respond to simple, direct questions or requests for information and will learn to ask formulaic questions and understand their responses.  Cultural topics covered will include those most necessary for survival in American academic culture, such as basic personal information, preferences, immediate needs (i.e., food and drink, health and wellness), as well as topics related to life on a university campus (i.e., College life, study habits, and time management.  Through this course, students’ listening and speaking proficiency will improve though class activities and homework assignments that help them apply their knowledge in the modalities of listening and speaking.  Through this course, students will improve their listening and speaking skills to the novice-high proficiency level. 

    Prerequisite(s)/Course Notes:
    Novice-low proficiency in listening and speaking (ACTFL) as defined by the ACTFL Proficiency Guidelines.



  
  • ESL 002a - Intermediate English Grammar, Reading, and Writing I

    Semester Hours: 0
    This course is designed for non-native English-speaking students with novice-high oral and listening proficiency as defined by the ACTFL Proficiency Guidelines to enhance their interpretive listening and viewing skills, interpersonal and presentational oral skills.  They will learn to understand short non-complex listening and viewing texts that convey basic information and deal with basic personal and social topics to which the listener or viewer brings personal interest or experience.  Students will learn to extract meaning from short connected texts featuring description and narration on familiar topics related to predictable situations, as well as from short news reports from local and national news.  They will practice and improve their listening and speaking skills (interpersonal and presentational) by combining and recombining known elements and conversational input. By the end of the course, students will be able to understand spoken texts and speak on a broad range of topics, communicating their own meanings at the intermediate-mid level (ACTFL).

    Prerequisite(s)/Course Notes:
    Novice-high proficiency in reading and writing as defined by the ACTFL Proficiency Guidelines. (May be demonstrated by successful completion of ESL 001a )



  
  • ESL 002b - Intermediate Listening and Speaking in English I

    Semester Hours: 0
    This course is designed for non-native English-speaking students with novice-high oral and listening proficiency as defined by the American Council on the Teaching of Foreign Languages (ACTFL) Proficiency Guidelines to enhance their interpretive listening and viewing skills, interpersonal and presentational oral skills.  They will learn to understand short non-complex listening and viewing texts that convey basic information and deal with basic personal and social topics to which the listener or viewer brings personal interest or experience.  Students will learn to extract meaning from short connected texts featuring description and narration on familiar topics related to predictable situations, as well as from short news reports from local and national news.  They will practice and improve their listening and speaking skills (interpersonal and presentational) by combining and recombining known elements and conversational input. By the end of the course, students will be able to understand spoken texts and speak on a broad range of topics, communicating their own meanings at the intermediate-mid level (ACTFL).

    Prerequisite(s)/Course Notes:
    Novice-high proficiency in listening and speaking as defined by the AFTFL Proficiency Guidelines. (May be demonstrated by successful completion of ESL 001b )



  
  • ESL 003a - Intermediate English Grammar, Reading, and Writing II

    Semester Hours: 0
    This course is designed for non-native English-speaking students with intermediate-mid proficiency in reading and writing as defined by the American Council on the Teaching of Foreign Languages (ACTFL) Proficiency Guidelines.  The course focuses on improving students’ grammar usage, broadening their vocabulary, improving their academic writing, and enhancing their interpretive reading strategies so they can narrate and describe in different time frames when writing about everyday events and situations in paragraph length discourse using complex syntax.  Students will use a broad range of texts to study conventions of academic writing, which they will use in practice: generating ideas, drafting, revising, editing, and publishing, with the goal of enabling students to master summarizing, paraphrasing, and reflecting upon assigned reading materials.  By the end of the course, students will improve their reading and writing skills to the intermediate-high level (ACTFL).

    Prerequisite(s)/Course Notes:
    Intermediate-mid proficiency in reading and writing, as defined by the ACTFL Proficiency Guidelines. (May be demonstrated by successful completion of non-credit bearing ESL 002a )



  
  • ESL 003b - Intermediate Listening and Speaking in English II

    Semester Hours: 0
    This course is designed for non-native English speaking students with intermediate-mid oral and listening proficiency as defined by the American Council on the Teaching of Foreign Languages (ACTFL) Proficiency Guidelines to enhance their interpretive listening and viewing skills, and interpersonal and presentational oral skills.  This course focuses on effective strategies for listening to oral presentations, participating in classroom and general academic discourse, giving presentations, and leading discussions.  Students will also watch local and national news to promote discussion about the news and the different perspectives embedded in news broadcasts.  At the end of the class, students will be able to understand longer spoken texts supported with visual cues (i.e., PowerPoint presentations and video texts) and will be able to provide spoken narrations and descriptions in all time frames in paragraph-length discourse with complex syntax in rehearsed topic areas.  By the end of the course, students will improve their listening and speaking skills to the intermediate-high level (ACTFL).

    Prerequisite(s)/Course Notes:
    Intermediate-mid proficiency in listening and speaking as defined by the ACTFL Proficiency Guidelines. (May be demonstrated by successful completion of non-credit bearing ESL 002b )



  
  • ESL 004a - Intermediate English Grammar, Reading, and Writing III

    Semester Hours: 0
    This course is designed for non-native English-speaking students with intermediate-high proficiency in reading and writing as defined by the American Council on the Teaching of Foreign Languages (ACTFL) Proficiency Guidelines.  It focuses on improving students’ grammar usage, broadening their vocabulary, enhancing their interpretive reading strategies, analyzing cultural content in the texts, and improving their academic writing so they can narrate and describe in different time frames when writing about everyday events and situations.  Students will read a broad range of texts, and improve their mastery of the conventions of academic writing with special attention to well-structured paragraphs and the rhetorical structure of longer essays.  By the end of the course students will improve their reading and writing skills to the advanced-low level (ACTFL).

    Prerequisite(s)/Course Notes:
    Intermediate-high proficiency in reading and writing as defined by the ACTFL Proficiency Guidelines. (May be demonstrated by successful completion of non-credit bearing ESL ESL 003a )



  
  • ESL 004b - Intermediate Listening and Speaking in English III

    Semester Hours: 0
    This course is designed for non-native English-speaking students with intermediate-high oral and listening proficiency, as defined by the American Council on the Teaching of Foreign Languages (ACTFL) Proficiency Guidelines, to enhance their interpretive listening and viewing skills, and interpersonal and presentational oral skills.  Students will practice and improve their skills in understanding spoken English on different topics.  The primary goals are the development of interpretive listening and viewing skills with a focus on the language functions of narration and description in all time frames in content areas, including current events. Course activities will also help students expand the range of effective strategies used for listening to presentations and lectures, participating in and leading class discussions, giving presentations, and improving their pronunciation.  By the end of the course students will improve their listening and speaking skills to the advanced-low level (ACTFL).

    Prerequisite(s)/Course Notes:
    Intermediate-high proficiency in listening and speaking as defined by the ACTFL Proficiency Guidelines. (May be demonstrated by successful completion of non-credit bearing ESL 003b )



  
  • ESL 005A - Advanced Reading, Writing, and Grammar I

    Semester Hours: 0


    Fall, Spring, Summer

    This course is designed for English language learners with advanced-low reading and writing skills as defined by the ACTFL Proficiency Guidelines.  Reading and writing tasks will focus on the language functions of narration and description in all time frames, with attention to paragraph-level discourse and complex syntax, building toward reading and writing projects that engage the language functions of argument (sustained opinion) and hypothesis.  

    Prerequisite(s)/Course Notes:
    Intermediate-high proficiency in reading and writing (level 4) or placement into level 5 by an appropriate test score.

    Repeatable once, not for credit.



  
  • ESL 005B - Advanced Listening, Viewing, and Speaking I

    Semester Hours: 0


    Fall, Spring, Summer

    This workshop-style course is student-centered and aims to maximize student opportunities to practice and improve their speaking and listening skills.  The course is designed for non-native English-speaking students to polish and enhance their communicative skills in English and to help them succeed in their academic, professional, and social pursuits. The primary goals of the course are the development of students’ interpretive listening and viewing skills as well as the improvement of their interpersonal and presentational speaking skills in paragraph-length discourse, with a focus on the language functions of narration and description in all time frames in content areas including current events and other concrete (non-abstract) topics. The class will help students develop effective strategies for listening to lectures, participating in classroom and general academic discourse, and giving presentations. In addition, the course provides a focus on pronunciation training and opportunities for oral fluency practice. 

    Prerequisite(s)/Course Notes:
    Intermediate-high proficiency in listening and speaking (level 4) or placement into level 5 by an appropriate test score.

    Repeatable once, not for credit.



  
  • ESL 006A - Advanced Reading, Writing, and Grammar ll

    Semester Hours: 0


    Fall, Spring, Summer

    This course is designed for non-native English-speaking students with advanced-mid proficiency in reading and writing as defined by the ACTFL Proficiency Guidelines. The course focuses on improving students’ grammar usage, broadening their vocabulary, improving their academic writing, and enhancing their interpretive reading strategies. Through the use of a broad range of texts, students study the conventions of academic writing along with a review of grammar and prose mechanics. In this course we teach students to write in extended length about a variety of concrete and abstract topics, in the language functions of argument (supported opinion) and hypothesis, in formal register with significant precision and detail. 

    Prerequisite(s)/Course Notes:
    Advanced-low proficiency in reading and writing (level 5) or placement into level 6 by an appropriate test score.

    Repeatable once, not for credit.



 

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