May 27, 2024  
2022-2023 Undergraduate Bulletin 
    
2022-2023 Undergraduate Bulletin [ARCHIVED BULLETIN]

Course Descriptions


 

Physics (PHYS)

  
  • PHYS 014S - First-Year Seminar

    Semester Hours: 3-4
    Spring
    This course gives first-year students the opportunity to work in a seminar format with a member of the faculty in an area of the faculty member’s research interests.

    Prerequisite(s)/Course Notes:

    The course is open to first-year students only. Topics vary by semester.  This course is offered for distribution credit; consult the Semester Planning Guide for proper category listing. Students may take only one 14F or 12F seminar and only one 14S or 12S seminar.



  
  • PHYS 100 - Departmental Honors Candidacy: Research

    Semester Hours: 3
    Fall, Spring
    Research into a physical problem — either experimental, theoretical or computational — in physics, applied physics or astrophysics.

    Prerequisite(s)/Course Notes:
    Open only to senior physics majors  who are eligible for and desire to graduate with departmental honors. Students make a written and oral presentation to department faculty. Interested students must secure, before registration, written permission of the chairperson and instructor who will supervise the investigation. (Formerly Honors Program.)



  
  
  
  
  • PHYS 118B - Modern Physics Laboratory I

    Semester Hours: 1
    Once a Year
    Measurement of the atomic constants; atomic spectra; X-ray diffraction; mass spectroscopy; electron paramagnetic resonance; Rutherford scattering; vacuum deposition and thin films; nuclear physics including counting techniques, alpha, beta and gamma spectra, neuron cross sections and activation analysis. (3 hours laboratory exercises to accompany PHYS 118A .) Students will make an oral presentation of their results.

    Prerequisite(s)/Course Notes:
    Corequisite: PHYS 118A . Satisfies the intermediate/advanced laboratory requirement. It is strongly recommended to take PHYS 118A  concurrently.



  
  • PHYS 118C - Modern Physics Laboratory I

    Semester Hours: 1
    Once a Year
    Measurement of the atomic constants; atomic spectra; X-ray diffraction; mass spectroscopy; electron paramagnetic resonance; Rutherford scattering; vacuum deposition and thin films; nuclear physics including counting techniques, alpha, beta and gamma spectra, neuron cross sections and activation analysis. (3 hours laboratory exercises to accompany PHYS 118A .) Students will make an oral presentation of their results. 

    Prerequisite(s)/Course Notes:
    PHYS 118A . Satisfies the intermediate/advanced laboratory requirement.



  
  
  
  
  
  
  
  
  
  
  
  
  
  
  
  
  
  
  
  • PHYS 170 - Independent Undergraduate Research

    Semester Hours: 1-3
    Periodically
    Students who qualify will undertake a research project under individual faculty guidance. Students may elect to continue undergraduate research for more than two terms. Students will make oral presentations of their results. 

    Prerequisite(s)/Course Notes:
    Permission of department chairperson is required. May be repeated for credit with approval of the department chairperson.



  
  • PHYS 170L - Independent Undergraduate Research

    Semester Hours: 1-3
    Periodically
    Students who qualify will undertake an experimental or computer research project under individual faculty guidance. Students may elect to continue undergraduate research for more than two terms. Students will make oral presentations of their results.

    Prerequisite(s)/Course Notes:
    Permission of department chairperson. Satisfies the intermediate/advanced laboratory requirement. May be repeated for credit with approval of the department chairperson.



  
  
  • PHYS 171L - Independent Undergraduate Research

    Semester Hours: 1-3
    Periodically
    Students who qualify will undertake an experimental or computer research project under individual faculty guidance. Students may elect to continue undergraduate research for more than two terms. Students will make oral presentations of their results. 

    Prerequisite(s)/Course Notes:
    Permission of department chairperson is required. Satisfies the intermediate/advanced laboratory requirement.



  
  • PHYS 185 - Physics Internship

    Semester Hours: 1-6
    Periodically
    Physics majors  who have been offered an internship may receive credit through this course if approved in advance by the chairperson of the Physics and Astronomy  Department. The internship must involve significant experiential training for a position in which a college degree would be necessary for full-time employment and in which a major in physics would be considered beneficial. The number of semester hours depends on the type of work and on the number of hours worked and will be determined by the chairperson.

    Prerequisite(s)/Course Notes:
    PHYS 118A , students must be physics majors with an overall GPA of 3.0 or better and physics GPA of 3.0 or better. May be repeated for credit up to 6 s.h. Generally, students can expect to receive 1 s.h. per 28 hours worked. At the end of the semester, students will write and present a paper on the role of physics in the internship position. Students will be expected to keep a journal on their experience and to meet with the faculty mentor assigned to the course a minimum of three times to review the journal and paper preparations. Semester hours earned count toward general degree requirements. A maximum of 1 s.h. may be applied toward the BA in physics ; a maximum of 2 s.h. may be applied toward the BS in physics  or the BS in applied physics . Final grades will include both on-site and academic work. An on-site evaluation of “poor” will result in a final grade no higher than “C”.




Political Science (PSC)

  
  
  • PSC 002 - (BH) Comparative Politics

    Semester Hours: 3
    Fall, Spring
    This course introduces students to the major concepts and issues in comparative politics, using a variety of case studies from different regions of the world. Topics examined include: political institutions, political culture, and political participation. Issues relating to regime types, political economy, and political development will also be examined.



  
  
  
  • PSC 014F - First-Year Seminar

    Semester Hours: 3-4


    Fall

    This course gives first-year students the opportunity to work in a seminar format with a member of the faculty in an area of the faculty member’s research interests.

    Prerequisite(s)/Course Notes:
    The course is open to first-year students only. Topics vary by semester.  This course is offered for distribution credit; consult the Semester Planning Guide for proper category listing. Students may take only one 014F or 012F seminar and only one 014S or 012S seminar.



  
  • PSC 014S - First-Year Seminar

    Semester Hours: 3-4
    Spring
    This course gives first-year students the opportunity to work in a seminar format with a member of the faculty in an area of the faculty member’s research interests.

    Prerequisite(s)/Course Notes:
    The course is open to first-year students only. Topics vary by semester.  This course is offered for distribution credit; consult the Semester Planning Guide for proper category listing. Students may take only one 014F or 012F seminar and only one 014S or 012S seminar.



  
  
  
  
  
  • PSC 108 - (BH, CC) Politics of the Middle East

    Semester Hours: 3
    Fall, Spring
    A general introduction to the political, economic, and cultural dynamics of the contemporary Middle East. Examines the legacy of colonialism and the resultant culture clash between East and West, the impact of nationalist and Islamic movements, trends of authoritarianism and democracy, the political economy of oil, and the rise of al-Qaeda.



  
  • PSC 109 - (CC) Political Islam

    Semester Hours: 3
    Periodically
    This course examines the political dimensions of Islam. We will trace back the roots of Islam centered political ideologies, situating them within their historical and social contexts. We will investigate social, political, economic, and religious agendas of traditionalist, modernist, as well as fundamentalist Muslim movements. Focusing on a set of chosen Muslim countries, we will explore what motivates individuals to join political movements, drawing on Islam as a main reference system. Students will get acquainted with basic political concepts of the Islamic tradition, and the way these concepts are negotiated vis-à-vis modern institutions and values such as the nation state, secularism, democracy and human rights.

    Prerequisite(s)/Course Notes:
    Same as RELI 153 .



  
  
  
  • PSC 112 - Politics of Education

    Semester Hours: 3
    Periodically

    This course offers students the opportunity to explore, synthesize and develop a critical understanding of the politics of education. Through an examination of political theory in education, the political structure of the American education system, and selected educational policy issues, students will gain insight into the political quality of American society more generally.

    Prerequisite(s)/Course Notes:
    May be applied toward liberal arts credit. Liberal arts credit is awarded to students who have declared or intend to declare a major or minor in education. 



  
  • PSC 113 - Technology and Defense Policy

    Semester Hours: 3
    Once a Year
    Emphasis on weapons technology (ABMs long range missiles, nuclear weapons) and how evolving technology influences and is in turn, influenced by changing policies in military security and arms control. Analysis of major U.S. policy decisions concerning strategies, arms control and military systems. The technological, environmental, political, strategic and budgetary factors affecting these decisions are examined.

    Prerequisite(s)/Course Notes:
    Same as TPP 113 .



  
  
  
  • PSC 116 - (BH, CC) Women and Politics in the Middle East

    Semester Hours: 3-4
    This course examines women’s involvement in and their exclusion from politics in the Middle East with attention to the relationship between gender and power. The course covers a broad range of Middle Eastern countries and themes such as sexuality, employment, political activism, and Islamist movements. Variable credit to allow the option for an additional fourth credit hour when taught as a writing-intensive class.



  
  • PSC 117 - (CC) Religion and Politics in Turkey

    Semester Hours: 3
    Periodically
    This course focuses on religious and political identities and institutions in Turkey as they have been formulated and contested throughout the late Ottoman Empire and Republican Turkey. We will study the religious history and the role of Islam as a cultural, societal and political force. Combining historical, sociological, and anthropological perspectives, the course aims to create a comprehensive picture of modern Turkey that allows for a deeper understanding of the country’s ambivalent relationship to its Ottoman past, the Western world, and the public role of Islam.

    Prerequisite(s)/Course Notes:
    RELI 050  or 012 , with permission of instructor.



  
  • PSC 118 - Political Economy of Turkey

    Semester Hours: 3
    Periodically
    This is an interdisciplinary course focusing on the nation of Turkey, and exploring the conflicts in Turkish society between modern and traditional, secular and religious, and rich and poor. Particular attention is paid to the young and dynamic nature of the country, and classes cover a broad range of topics examining Turkey’s history and its modern political structure. Among the topics to be studied are, the attempts over the past two hundred years to modernize Turkey, the social and political conflicts these attempts have generated, the domestic and international political difficulties the country is faced with, and the nature of its recent economic problems. Required readings are drawn from a variety of sources and disciplines in the social sciences.

    Prerequisite(s)/Course Notes:
    Same as ECO 118 .



  
  • PSC 119 - (BH) Urban Politics and Governance

    Semester Hours: 3
    This course explores the role of political, economic, and social forces that have influenced the development of the major issues facing urban communities in the 21st Century. The course also examines the role of major participants and stakeholders in local politics.  The course also considers and the role of government policy in addressing a variety of urban problems.

    Prerequisite(s)/Course Notes:
    Credit is given for PSC 119 or AFST 112  but not both.



  
  
  
  • PSC 122 - Congress: National Legislative Process

    Semester Hours: 3
    Spring

    The course examines the lawmaking branch of the United States government. Congress is studied as an assembly of individuals representing disparate local constituencies and the nation’s most powerful lawmaking body. Students who take the course will gain insight into how Congress works, its virtues and shortcomings, and how the institution might be improved.



  
  • PSC 123 - The Politics of American Health Care

    Semester Hours: 3
    Spring
    This course will focus on how and why the American health care system differs from of other industrialized countries and will ask whether these differences are assets or liabilities.  Students will confront a number of paradoxes regarding American health care. These include: How is it possible for the American health care system to be characterized simultaneously as the best and worst in the world? Why are many Americans critical of the system even as they purport to be satisfied with their own health care? If Americans agree that the system is broken or flawed, why are efforts to reform health care so controversial and why are the problems so difficult to solve? The course will focus on efforts to reform the American health care system including the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act.

    Prerequisite(s)/Course Notes:
    May not be taken on a Pass/D+/D/Fail basis. Credit given either for this course or PSC 151, The Politics of Health Care, not both. (Formerly, PSC 151, The Politics of Health Care.)



  
  • PSC 124 - (BH) US Immigration Politics and Policy

    Semester Hours: 3-4
    This course seeks to provide a broad overview of immigration politics and policy in the United States. What groups are important in determining how immigrants are recruited, received, excluded from, and deported from the United States? Why has it been so difficult to “reform” the US immigration system or even agree on what shape a comprehensive reform might take? How does social science inform the debate about immigration policy in the United States, particularly when public opinion is sensitive to racial appeals and perceptions of threat? The course will begin with a history of immigration policy from the Republic’s earliest days to the present day. It will focus on a few watershed policies such as those enacted in 1882, 1924, 1965, 1986, and 1996, finishing with the immigration proposals put forward at the national level in the past 20 years. Who are the winners and losers in this policy area? Why is it so difficult for the national government to adopt meaningful reform at the national level? Are state and local governments better positioned to address our economic, social, and humanitarian goals? What do we know about how immigrants integrated into American society socially, economically, and politically?



  
  
  
  
  
  • PSC 130 - (BH, CC) Latin American and Caribbean Politics

    Semester Hours: 3
    Spring
    Comparative study of selected aspects of Latin American and Caribbean political behavior, with particular attention devoted to social stratification, political elites, power structures and political change. Also examines the clash between traditional cultural values and modernizing pressures in the Latin American and Caribbean context.



  
  • PSC 131 - (CC) Comparative Political Economy of Development

    Semester Hours: 3
    Spring
    This course uses a political lens to examine why some countries have demonstrated a significant level of economic development while others have not. Students will explore various theoretical explanations as well as empirical evidence, paying particular attention to political responses to changing international economic forces.

    Prerequisite(s)/Course Notes:
    May not be taken on a Pass/D+/D/Fail basis.



  
  • PSC 132 - Comparative European Governments

    Semester Hours: 3
    Fall, Spring

    This course examines the contemporary changes, challenges, and events across Europe and how the past has shaped contemporary Europe. We will examine in-depth the political history and contemporary politics of several European countries, including Central Europe. Examination of several countries will elucidate the differences and similarities across Europe. Special attention will be given to current events.



  
  
  
  
  • PSC 136 - Terrorism in World Politics

    Semester Hours: 3
    Once a Year
    This course examines the nature of terrorism and related forms of political violence and the motivations behind their use. In addition, the class examines some of the most pressing problems related to terrorism and the means by which governments have attempted to deal with these problems. Specific issues to be covered include: terrorist decision-making, ideology and terrorism, the phenomenon of suicide terrorism, past and present significant terrorist organizations and movements, state sponsorship of terrorism, weapons of mass destruction and terrorism, and military, diplomatic, and other counterterrorism approaches. 

    Prerequisite(s)/Course Notes:
    May not be taken on a Pass/D+/D/Fail basis. Credit given for this course, PSC 152: Terrorism in World Politics, or PSC 152A: Terrorism in World Politics. (Formerly PSC 152: Terrorism in World Politics, PSC 152A: Terrorism in World Politics.)



  
  
  
  
  
  
  
  • PSC 145 - (BH, CC) Japan: Government and Politics

    Semester Hours: 3
    Once a year
    The Japanese political system, focusing upon the evolution of Japan as a modern nation-state since the Meiji Restoration of 1868.  Examines the clash between traditional Japanese culture and modernizing pressures from the West.  Special attention to the right-wing ideology that has shaped modern Japan and to the opponents of that ideology; the political impact of Japan’s economic development through technological innovation; the dynamics of contemporary Japanese party politics and mass political participation: Japan’s role in global affairs.



  
  
  
  • PSC 148 - Political Science Scope and Methods

    Semester Hours: 3
    Periodically
    An introduction to a variety of empirical research methods used by political scientists. The primary aims of the course are to train students to be more sophisticated consumers of diverse empirical research and to allow students to conduct advanced independent undergraduate work.

    Prerequisite(s)/Course Notes:
    (Formerly Contemporary Political Analysis.)



  
  • PSC 149 - Political Analysis and Statistics

    Semester Hours: 3-4


    Once a Year

    An introduction to modern political analysis with a focus on using statistics to analyze quantitative data. Students will learn statistical skills to analyze real political science data, translating that analysis into easy-to-understand text and visual representations of the data.  When taught for 4 credits, the course will provide students an introduction to the R computer program, an emerging, open-source application/language to conduct statistical analysis.

     

    Prerequisite(s)/Course Notes:
    May not be taken on a Pass/D+/D/Fail basis.



  
  • PSC 151 A-Z - Special Topics in American Politics

    Semester Hours: 1-4


    Periodically

    An advanced course in the analysis of major problems in American Politics.
     

    Current Special Topics

    PSC 151F: Evaluating the Obama Presidency

    This seminar will examine leadership and policymaking during the Obama presidency.  We will begin by examining the 2008 presidential race and Barack Obama’s historic election as the first African American President of the United States.  We then will analyze major policy issues in the eight years of the Obama administration, including the great recession, health care, immigration, climate change, counter-terrorism, U.S. wars in Afghanistan and Iraq, and other topics.  We will conclude with an assessment of Obama’s legacy for the institution of the American presidency as well as U.S. and world politics. We will have special opportunities to meet with presidency scholars and former administration officials in connection with Hofstra’s Thirteenth Presidential Conference: The Barack Obama Presidency, which will take place April 19-21, 2023.

    PSC 151J: Careers in Washington DC

    This one-credit pass-fail course is an optional add-on to the Political Science Department’s annual Washington, D.C. trip (Saturday, October 22-Tuesday October 25, 2022). Its goal is to prepare students to use the Washington Trip’s networking opportunities to establish career connections. Students will view four online mini-lectures prior to the trip and participate in the trip itself, which includes visits to Washington museums, briefings from public service career professionals, and networking opportunities with Hofstra alumni in DC. There will be several brief written/practical assignments to be handed in after the trip.

    Prerequisite(s)/Course Notes:
    As individual subjects are selected, each is assigned a letter (A-Z) which is affixed to the course number. The course involves substantial reading, discussion and writing. Includes regular seminar sessions and individual conferences with instructor. Specific titles and course descriptions for special topics courses are available in the online class schedule. (Formerly PSC 151: Seminar: American Politics.)



  
  • PSC 152 A-Z - Special Topics in International Politics

    Semester Hours: 1-4
    Periodically
    An advanced course in the analysis of major problems in International Politics.

    Prerequisite(s)/Course Notes:
    As individual subjects are selected, each is assigned a letter (A-Z) which is affixed to the course number. The course involves substantial reading, discussion and writing. Includes regular seminar sessions and individual conferences with instructor. Specific titles and course descriptions for special topics courses are available in the online class schedule. (Formerly PSC 152: Seminar: International Politics.)



  
  • PSC 153 A-Z - Special Topics in Political Theory

    Semester Hours: 1-4


    Periodically

    An advanced course in the analysis of major problems in Political Theory.

    Current Special Topics

    PSC 153D: Political Ideologies

    Public intellectuals have predicted  the ‘end of ideology’.  Today, ideologies seem more relevant than ever, and ideological polarization is on the rise in many countries, including the United States. Our primary purpose will be to secure a solid grasp of the core tenets of several major political ideologies, along with their respective back-stories and historical contexts.  We’ll examine a number of case studies throughout the semester, detailing relevant real-world events, people, organizations and systems, and we’ll read articles from current media about contemporary ideological debates and developments.  This is a course about ideas, and students who find such material invigorating will be highly stimulated by these investigations.

    Prerequisite(s)/Course Notes:
    As individual subjects are selected, each is assigned a letter (A-Z) which is affixed to the course number. The course involves substantial reading, discussion and writing. Includes regular seminar sessions and individual conferences with instructor. Specific titles and course descriptions for special topics courses are available in the online class schedule. (Formerly PSC 153: Seminar: Political Theory.)



  
  • PSC 154 A-Z - Special Topics in Comparative Politics

    Semester Hours: 1-4


    Periodically

    An advanced course in the analysis of major problems in Comparative Politics.

    Current Special Topics

    PSC 154E: Arab Revolutions

    In 2011, a massive wave of protest against dictatorship swept the Arab world. The outcomes ranged from fragile democratic transition to civil war to retrenchment of the previous regime. This course will examine the causes, events and outcomes of this phenomenon collectively known as “Arab Spring” in multiple countries. These events continue to reverberate in regional politics and offer a unique window into the challenges of large-scale political change in the Arab world and beyond. 

    Prerequisite(s)/Course Notes:
    As individual subjects are selected, each is assigned a letter (A-Z) which is affixed to the course number. The course involves substantial reading, discussion and writing. Includes regular seminar sessions and individual conferences with instructor. Specific titles and course descriptions for special topics courses are available in the online class schedule. (Formerly PSC 154: Seminar: Comparative Politics.)



  
  • PSC 161 - Independent Readings in Political Science

    Semester Hours: 1-3
    Fall, Spring

    Individualized reading course designed to meet special interests of the student and to fill gaps in the student’s understanding of political science.

    Prerequisite(s)/Course Notes:
    Written consent by a member of the department to serve as the tutor. Ordinarily, open only to juniors and seniors who are capable of independent study.



  
  • PSC 162 - Independent Readings in Political Science

    Semester Hours: 1-3
    Fall, Spring
    Individualized reading course designed to meet special interests of the student and to fill gaps in the student’s understanding of political science.

    Prerequisite(s)/Course Notes:
    Written consent by a member of department to serve as the tutor. Ordinarily open only to juniors and seniors who are capable of independent study.



  
  • PSC 170 - Political Science Internship

    Semester Hours: 1-3


    This is an individualized course designed to complement student’s specialized study of political science with supervised practice in the field.  Political Science majors who have been offered an internship (with an official invitation letter from the internship site) may receive credit through this course, if approved by the Internship coordinator and chair of the Political Science Department. The internship must be training for a position in which a college degree would be necessary for full-time employment and in which a major in Political Science would be considered beneficial.

    Prerequisite(s)/Course Notes:
    Students who undertake a local internship in political science will have at least sophomore standing and an overall GPA of 2.5.  The internship may count toward the major or minor in political science, as elective PSC credit, or additional coursework credit in PSC. There are no formal prerequisites, but students are strongly encouraged to take the foundational course corresponding to the subject content of their internship.  For instance, American Politics (PSC 1) is strongly encouraged prior to an internship in the home office of a member of Congress or state legislator.  International Politics (PSC 135) is strongly encouraged prior to an internship at the United Nations.  The department accepts no more than 6 credits of internship toward the major.

    This course is offered for variable credit from 1-3 credits.  For each credit offered, the student is required to log in 28 hours working at the internship site, 10 hours on research and analysis and 3 contact hours with supervising professor for a total of 41 hours. Final grades will include both on-site and academic work.   



  
  • PSC 192 - Field Study at the United Nations

    Semester Hours: 3
    January, Every Other Year

    This course takes advantage of Hofstra’s proximity to the United Nations and its related organizations in New York City. About half of the time available in this course will be devoted to learning about the institution and work of the UN itself. The other half will consist of briefings from the various embassies representing their nations at the UN. Students will have the opportunity to interact directly with diplomats and high level staff who do the actual work of global politics. With the exception of the first, organizational, meeting, which will be held on campus, all other sessions will be held in Manhattan.



  
  
  • PSC 195 - Introduction to Administration

    Semester Hours: 3
    Periodically
    Identify patterns and principles of administration common to the fields of business, education, health and medicine, and public administration. The functional categories of decision making (planning), organizing, allocating resources, directing, controlling, communications and leadership are treated.

    Prerequisite(s)/Course Notes:
    Credit given for this course or EADM 200, not both.




Portuguese (PORT)

  
  
  
  
  
  
  • PORT 101 - Advanced Portuguese Language

    Semester Hours: 3
    Periodically
    PORT 101-106 is an integrated sequence of courses, rather than six individual courses. This sequence gradually develops the student’s proficiency in the spoken language, in writing (including grammar) and in reading. Text material ranges from short stories to longer narratives and poetry and includes culture and civilization topics. Students’ individual needs and interests will help determine the exact nature of each course. A detailed personal record of reading progress is maintained to assure the systematic development of each student’s facility in literary criticism. Courses may be taken in any order.



  
  • PORT 102 - Advanced Portuguese Language

    Semester Hours: 3
    Periodically
    PORT 101-106 is an integrated sequence of courses, rather than six individual courses. This sequence gradually develops the student’s proficiency in the spoken language, in writing (including grammar) and in reading. Text material ranges from short stories to longer narratives and poetry and includes culture and civilization topics. Students’ individual needs and interests will help determine the exact nature of each course. A detailed personal record of reading progress is maintained to assure the systematic development of each student’s facility in literary criticism. Courses may be taken in any order.



  
  • PORT 103 - Advanced Portuguese Language

    Semester Hours: 3
    Periodically
    PORT 101-106 is an integrated sequence of courses, rather than six individual courses. This sequence gradually develops the student’s proficiency in the spoken language, in writing (including grammar) and in reading. Text material ranges from short stories to longer narratives and poetry and includes culture and civilization topics. Students’ individual needs and interests will help determine the exact nature of each course. A detailed personal record of reading progress is maintained to assure the systematic development of each student’s facility in literary criticism. Courses may be taken in any order.



  
  • PORT 104 - Advanced Portuguese Language

    Semester Hours: 3
    Periodically
    PORT 101-106 is an integrated sequence of courses, rather than six individual courses. This sequence gradually develops the student’s proficiency in the spoken language, in writing (including grammar) and in reading. Text material ranges from short stories to longer narratives and poetry and includes culture and civilization topics. Students’ individual needs and interests will help determine the exact nature of each course. A detailed personal record of reading progress is maintained to assure the systematic development of each student’s facility in literary criticism. Courses may be taken in any order.



  
  • PORT 105 - Advanced Portuguese Language

    Semester Hours: 3
    Periodically
    PORT 101-106 is an integrated sequence of courses, rather than six individual courses. This sequence gradually develops the student’s proficiency in the spoken language, in writing (including grammar) and in reading. Text material ranges from short stories to longer narratives and poetry and includes culture and civilization topics. Students’ individual needs and interests will help determine the exact nature of each course. A detailed personal record of reading progress is maintained to assure the systematic development of each student’s facility in literary criticism. Courses may be taken in any order.



  
  • PORT 106 - Advanced Portuguese Language

    Semester Hours: 3
    Periodically
    PORT 101-106 is an integrated sequence of courses, rather than six individual courses. This sequence gradually develops the student’s proficiency in the spoken language, in writing (including grammar) and in reading. Text material ranges from short stories to longer narratives and poetry and includes culture and civilization topics. Students’ individual needs and interests will help determine the exact nature of each course. A detailed personal record of reading progress is maintained to assure the systematic development of each student’s facility in literary criticism. Courses may be taken in any order.



 

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