May 27, 2024  
2022-2023 Undergraduate Bulletin 
    
2022-2023 Undergraduate Bulletin [ARCHIVED BULLETIN]

Course Descriptions


 

Premedical Studies (PRMD)

  
  
  • PRMD 020 - Emergency Medicine Clinical Information Management

    Semester Hours: 2
    Fall, Spring
    Students will learn the fundamentals of clinical practice in emergency medicine: 1) medical terminology; 2) the elements that constitute a patient history and the performance of a physical examination; 3) how to document and manage clinical information; and 4) how to enter physicians’ orders into the medical information management system.

    Prerequisite(s)/Course Notes:
    BIOL 113 , 112 ; CHEM 003A 003B ,  ,  , 135 , and 137 , science GPA of 3.0 or higher, recommendation of instructor or adviser. May not be taken on a Pass/D+/D/Fail basis. No liberal arts credit. Classes will be taught at Long Island Jewish Medical Center in New Hyde Park.



  
  • PRMD 021 - Emergency Medicine Clinical Information Management Internship

    Semester Hours: 2
    Fall, Spring
    Students who have mastered the fundamentals of clinical information management and of the operation of an emergency medicine department will have the opportunity to work with emergency medicine attending physicians as clinical information managers.

    Prerequisite(s)/Course Notes:
    PRMD 020  and recommendation of PRMD 020  instructor. No liberal arts credit. Pass/Fail grade only. Students will spend 6 hours per week working in the emergency medicine department at Long Island Jewish Medical Center in New Hyde Park.



  
  • PRMD 021A - Clinical Research Internship

    Semester Hours: 2-4
    Periodically
    Students will learn, in the lecture portion, basic methodology in clinical research, including basic data collection, statistical analysis and research design as well as regulations and ethics unique to the clinical setting. Students will also participate in clinical research projects and will spend a variable number of hours (3-9) in clinical shifts. Students will gain experience as a research assistant by working regular shifts in the emergency department at either North Shore University Hospital or Long Island Jewish Medical Center.

    Prerequisite(s)/Course Notes:
    Undergraduate junior status or post-baccalaureate program, minimum of 20 semester hours of natural science requirements completed, 3.0 overall and science GPA and permission of pre-medical advisor. The lecture portion of the course meets one hour per week.  Students taking the course for two credits will add three hours of clinical work per week; students taking the course for three credits will add six hours of clinical work; students taking the course for four credits will add nine hours of clinical work.  No liberal arts credit. Pass/Fail grade only; students must earn a passing grade in both the lecture and the clinical portions of the course.




Psychology (PSY)

  
  • PSY 001 - Introduction to Psychology

    Semester Hours: 3-4
    Fall, Spring, Summer
    The central goal of this course is to provide a general introduction to the field of psychology. Students will learn how to reason about human behavior, how to think critically about science, and how to apply psychological theory\ and findings to everyday problems and issues. Topics covered will include psychological methods, biological bases of behavior, sensation and perception, learning, memory, personality, psychopathology, and social behavior.

    Prerequisite(s)/Course Notes:
    Prerequisite for all other psychology courses, except PSY 007 , 025  and 027 .



  
  
  • PSY 003 - Current Psychological Issues

    Semester Hours: 3
    Periodically

    Detailed exploration of several psychological topics of important social relevance (e.g., recent topics have included mental health, alcoholism, drug addictions, leadership). Topics vary depending on their social significance. Guest speakers representing topic relevant fields are featured. Students are required to submit independent research papers on each topic.



  
  
  
  
  
  
  • PSY 014F - First-Year Seminar

    Semester Hours: 3-4


    Fall

    This course gives first-year students the opportunity to work in a seminar format with a member of the faculty in an area of the faculty member’s research interests.

    Prerequisite(s)/Course Notes:
    The course is open to first-year students only. Topics vary by semester.  This course is offered for distribution credit; consult the Semester Planning Guide for proper category listing. Students may take only one 014F or 012F seminar and only one 014S or 012S seminar



  
  • PSY 014S - First-Year Seminar

    Semester Hours: 3-4


    Spring

    This course gives first-year students the opportunity to work in a seminar format with a member of the faculty in an area of the faculty member’s research interests.

    Prerequisite(s)/Course Notes:
    The course is open to first-year students only. Topics vary by semester.  This course is offered for distribution credit; consult the Semester Planning Guide for proper category listing. Students may take only one 014F or 012F seminar and only one 014S or 012S seminar.



  
  
  
  • PSY 027 - (BH) Positive Psychology

    Semester Hours: 3
    Once a Year
    This course explores theoretical conceptions of positive psychology, scientific research in this domain, and the experiences and practices that enhance well-being. Positive psychology is the study of how human beings prosper in the face of adversity. Its goal is to identify and enhance the human strengths and virtues that lead to living the “good life.”

    Prerequisite(s)/Course Notes:
    May not be taken on a Pass/D+/D/Fail basis.



  
  
  
  
  • PSY 037 - Industrial Behavior Modification

    Semester Hours: 3
    Periodically
    An introduction to behavioral principles in organizations. Theoretical issues in organizational psychology and the quality of working life is examined from the perspective of laboratory based research of human behavior. The application of operant techniques to traditional industrial problems such as productivity, sales, attendance and safety. Management based on applied behavior analysis is contrasted with traditional motivational theories.

    Prerequisite(s)/Course Notes:
    PSY 001  or 001A .



  
  
  
  
  
  
  
  
  
  • PSY 070 - Evolutionary Psychology

    Semester Hours: 3
    Once a Year
    A critical examination of theory and research in evolutionary psychology, an approach that draws upon the insights of evolutionary biology, cognitive psychology, and the neurosciences to explain the mechanisms of human thought and behavior as evolutionary adaptations to the challenges faced by our ancestors. The course will cover the application of this approach to such topics as sex roles, morality, food preferences, cooperation and war.

    Prerequisite(s)/Course Notes:
    PSY 001  or 001A .



  
  
  
  • PSY 087 - Sport Psychology

    Semester Hours: 3
    Periodically

    This course is designed to educate students on the relationship between the mind and body in sport.  Students will learn how the mind influences sport performance and how sports performances influence the mind by acquiring an understanding of contemporary principles and theories developed in sport and psychology and then applying that to real sport situations in both recreational and competitive settings.

    Prerequisite(s)/Course Notes:
    PSY 001 or PSY 001A  



  
  
  • PSY 095 - Research Experience in Psychology

    Semester Hours: 1-3
    Periodically
    This work-study program provides students with an opportunity to apply academic and theoretical knowledge to the practice of conducting research. Work at an approved on-campus laboratory with mentorship from a faculty member is combined with reading and writing assignments, including an in-depth term paper that situates the research experience within the broader framework of psychological theory and scholarship.

    Prerequisite(s)/Course Notes:
    Successful completion of at least 18 s.h. of psychology with a psychology GPA of 3.0 or above. Permission of the Psychology  Department research and internship coordinator. A minimum of 38 hours of work for each semester hour of credit: 28 hours of research work and 10 hours of academic work. May be repeated for credit up to a total of 3 s.h. May not be taken on a Pass/D+/D/Fail basis.



  
  • PSY 099 - Internship in Psychology

    Semester Hours: 1-3
    Periodically
    This work-study program aims at providing students with an opportunity to apply academic and theoretical knowledge to practical situations. Work in an approved government or non-government agency or research institution is combined with reading and writing assignments, including an in-depth term paper that situates the internship experience within the broader framework of psychological theory and scholarship. 

    Prerequisite(s)/Course Notes:
    Successful completion of at least 18 s.h. of psychology with a psychology GPA of 3.3 or above. Permission of Psychology  Department internship coordinator. A minimum of 38 hours of work for each semester hour of credit: 28 hours of on-site work and 10 hours of academic work. Also required, but not counted as part of the 10 hours of academic work, are a minimum of three meetings with a faculty adviser – one at the beginning, another at mid-term, and the final at the end of the work experience. Grades will be based on both on-site evaluation and academic work. An on-site evaluation of “poor” will result in a grade no higher than a C. May be repeated for up to a total of 3 s.h. May not be taken on a Pass/D+/D/Fail basis.



  
  • PSY 100 - Departmental Honors Candidacy: Research

    Semester Hours: 3-4
    Fall, Spring
    The research for and the writing of a substantial essay in the field of psychology such as a major literature review or an original experiment.

    Prerequisite(s)/Course Notes:
    PSY 001  or 001A . Open only to senior psychology majors who are eligible for and desire to graduate with departmental honors. Interested students must secure the written permission of a full-time faculty member who will supervise the project. An oral defense will be conducted at the conclusion of the project.



  
  • PSY 101 A-Z - Major Concepts in Psychology

    Semester Hours: 1


    Periodically
    An in-depth exploration of a significant historical, theoretical, empirical or methodological concept in the field.

    Current Special Topics

    PSY 101B: The Psychology of Social Media: Likes, Memes, and Addiction

    Discussion of psychological aspects of social media, including its influence in new forms of social interaction, recreation, happiness, body image, education, politics, and cyberbullying; with a strong focus on its addictive power and how to overcome it.

    Prerequisite(s)/Course Notes:
    May be repeated for credit when topics vary. Specific titles and course descriptions for special topics courses are available in the online class schedule.



  
  
  
  
  • PSY 141 - Research Methods and Design

    Semester Hours: 4
    Fall, Spring, Summer
    Major principles of research and data collection techniques in experimental psychology. Laboratory work with animals and/ or human beings includes research in selected topics. An oral presentation is required. (3 hours lecture, 3 hours laboratory.)

    Prerequisite(s)/Course Notes:
    PSY 040  or BIO 100 or equivalent. Students are advised to take this course no later than their junior year.



  
  
  
  
  
  
  
  
  
  
  
  
  
  • PSY 180 - Work Motivation: Theory and Applications

    Semester Hours: 3
    Periodically

    Examination of modern developments in motivational psychology as they pertain to individual behavior in organizational settings and their practical applications. Four approaches are examined. The first approach focuses upon need-motive-value strategies such as need fulfillment theories, intrinsic motivation and equity/justice theories. The second approach attends to expectancy-value formulations of behavior with attention directed toward VIE theory. A third approach involves an examination of the self-regulation-cognitive approach embodied in goal setting theory. The final theoretical perspective involves an analysis of the behavioral (operant) and social learning views of work motivation. The course focuses on the practical implications of motivational theory, with an emphasis upon job satisfaction, work design and reward systems.

    Prerequisite(s)/Course Notes:
    PSY 001  or 001A .



  
  • PSY 181 - Leadership and Group Processes

    Semester Hours: 3
    Periodically

    Presents a broad review and analysis of leadership in organizations and groups. Examines organizational workgroups within the perspective of the organization as a system. Topics include functions, history, theories, and styles of leadership. Gender issues, cross-cultural perspectives, leader-member relations, group development, communication, conflict, decision making, and self-managed teams are also examined.

    Prerequisite(s)/Course Notes:
    PSY 034  and 141 .



  
  
  • PSY 183 - Capstone Research Integration Course

    Semester Hours: 3


    Periodically

    Provides a capstone experience in which students integrate the knowledge and understanding of organizational behavior and leadership that they acquire in other courses in the concentration. Students work together in small groups on a single project throughout the term. Each group selects a research topic in consultation with the instructor. The project requires that data be collected from an industrial, public, voluntary, or non-profit organization. Using valid diagnostic procedures, students examine the psychological, structural, environmental, political, and cultural factors that affect organization systems.

    Prerequisite(s)/Course Notes:
    PSY 001  or 001A .



  
  
  • PSY 192 - Research Seminar: Animal Learning and Cognition

    Semester Hours: 4
    Periodically
    Problems and methods of research in learning and cognition in both human and nonhuman animals, involving basic behavioral mechanisms (e.g., learning by trial-and-error and reinforcement), as well as complex cognitive processes (e.g., insightful problem-solving and tool-use). Oral presentations will be required. (3 hours lecture, 3 hours laboratory.) 

    Prerequisite(s)/Course Notes:
    PSY 141  and 110 . (Formerly Research Seminar: Operant Behavior.)



  
  • PSY 194 - Research Seminar: Neuroscience

    Semester Hours: 4
    Fall, Spring

    Problems and methods of research in neuroscience, including biopsychology, cognitive neuroscience, and clinical neuropsychology. Experimental designs involving neuroimaging, EEG, and other advanced methodologies will be discussed. Oral presentations will be required. (3 hours lecture, 3 hours laboratory.)

    Prerequisite(s)/Course Notes:
    PSY 141  and either 166 , 170  or 177 . (Formerly Research Seminar: Behavioral Neuroscience.)



  
  
  
  

Public Policy and Public Service (PPPS)

  
  • PPPS 001 - (IS) Introduction to Public Policy and Public Service

    Semester Hours: 3
    Fall, Spring
    This course is the foundation for the BA major in public service and public policy . It is designed to introduce students to the development, execution, and evaluation of policy making. Students will explore contextual, conceptual and theoretical frameworks that influence policy, particularly (though, not exclusively) in the United States. The course will examine problem formulation, information collection, and policy formulation.  Readings will focus on theoretical approaches, specific methods and ethical concerns for policy analysis, and a wide range of positions will be presented.

    Prerequisite(s)/Course Notes:
    May not be taken on a Pass/D+/D/ Fail basis.



  
  • PPPS 100 - Departmental Honors Candidacy: Essay

    Semester Hours: 3


    Fall, Spring

    The research for and the writing of a substantial essay in the field of public policy.  Open only to senior public policy and public service majors who are eligible for and desire to graduate with departmental honors.

     

    Prerequisite(s)/Course Notes:
    Interested students must secure, before registration, written permission of the instructor who will supervise the essay.



  
  • PPPS 150 A-Z - Special Topics in Public Policy and Public Service

    Semester Hours: 1-4
    Fall, Spring
    Course deals with innovative topics in the area of public policy and public service.

    Prerequisite(s)/Course Notes:
    May be repeated for credit when topics vary. As individual subjects are selected, each is assigned a letter (A-Z) which is affixed to the course number. Specific titles and course descriptions for special topics courses are available in the online class schedule. Course may be offered on a Pass/D+/D/Fail basis.



  
  • PPPS 161 - Independent Readings in Public Policy and Public Service

    Semester Hours: 1-4
    Individualized reading course designed to meet special interests of student and to fill gaps in student’s study of public policy and public service. 

    Prerequisite(s)/Course Notes:
    Written consent by a professor to serve as instructor, and approval by executive dean for public policy and public service programs.  Typically open only to juniors and seniors who are prepared for the responsibilities of independent study.  May be repeated for credit (maximum 6 semester hours) when topics vary.



  
  • PPPS 162 - Internship in Public Policy and Public Service

    Semester Hours: 1-4 s.h.


    Fall, Spring

    Individualized course designed to complement student’s specialized study of public policy and public service with supervised practice in the field.  Public Policy and Public Service (PPPS) majors who have been offered an internship (with an official invitation letter from the internship site) may receive credit through this course if approved by the executive dean of the PPPS program. The internship must be training for a position in which a college degree would be necessary for full-time employment and in which a major in Public Policy and Public Service would be considered beneficial

    Prerequisite(s)/Course Notes:
    Written consent by a professor to serve as instructor, and approval by executive dean for public policy and public service programs.  Typically open only to juniors and seniors who are prepared for responsibilities of independent study.  Students must be a PPPS major with an overall GPA of 3.0 or better and a program GPA of 3.0 or better.  May be taken for credit up to 6 semester hours. The number of semester hours depends on the type of work and on the number of hours worked and will be determined by the executive dean.  Generally, students can expect to receive 1 s.h. per 28 hours worked. At the end of the semester, students will write and present a paper on the role of public policy and/or public service in the internship position. Students will be expected to keep a journal on their experience and to meet with the faculty mentor assigned to the course a minimum of three times to review the journal and paper preparations.  Final grades will include both on-site and academic work.  An on-site evaluation of “poor” will result in a final grade no higher than “C”.




Public Relations (PR)

  
  • PR 100 - Fundamentals of Public Relations

    Semester Hours: 3
    Fall, Spring

    This is an introductory course in public relations (PR). Students will study how PR practitioners are responsible for the development, reinforcement, and advancement of attitudes toward institutions, issues, and individuals through the implementation of managed plans and effective storytelling. The class will define public relations and examine the importance of defining an audience, understanding attitudes, and measuring feedback. Students will discover how PR differs from, but is frequently integrated with, advertising and marketing, and will learn the variety of communication tools used for public relations campaigns and media relations. The class will examine various aspects of traditional and social media, and develop an understanding of earned vs. owned media. Students will also learn the PRSA Code of Ethics, and review reputation management and crisis communications.



  
  • PR 102 - Insights and Analytics

    Semester Hours: 3


    Fall, Spring

    This course is designed to provide students with an understanding of the importance of research in developing public relations strategies that impact public awareness and action. Conducting their own projects, students learn how research can be used to create and strengthen public relations campaigns. Students gain an understanding of probability sampling, research methodologies, digital and social media surveys, data analytics and report writing. Students will learn how to obtain and analyze information and how to present and communicate findings into actionable recommendations.

    Prerequisite(s)/Course Notes:
    PR 100 



  
  • PR 103 - Writing for Public Relations and Media

    Semester Hours: 3


    Fall, Spring

    This course emphasizes writing skills fundamental to the public relations profession by examining content rules, approaches, and styles. Topics will include founding principles of integrated media writing, including grammar and punctuation, AP style, presentations and speeches, and communication ethics. The class will emphasize storytelling within various platforms using images and appropriate writing to reach target audiences effectively.

    Prerequisite(s)/Course Notes:
    PR 100 . May not be taken on a Pass/D+/D/Fail basis.



  
  • PR 104 - Specializations and Practice Areas of Public Relations

    Semester Hours: 3
    Fall, Spring

    PR professionals practice in a variety of specialties, each serving unique publics. The goal of this class is to generate knowledge of effective principles of strategic public relations within specialized areas of public relations and to promote ethical approaches to strategic planning in a variety of industries. Through a mixture of guest lectures, readings and case study analysis, students will examine how public relations theories and tools become specialized for varying disciplines such as sports public relations, health care public relations, entertainment public relations, fashion public relations and non-profit public relations, travel public relations and others.  Focusing on real-world applications, this course critically analyzes examples of how public relations practitioners have tried to enhance interactions with key publics to achieve organizational objectives.

    Prerequisite(s)/Course Notes:
    PR 100 . Course Notes: Open only to PR juniors and seniors



  
  • PR 105 - Media and Influencer Relations

    Semester Hours: 3


    Fall, Spring

    This course is an overview of the media relations process in the digital era. Students analyze the state of contemporary media – online and off – and its impact on public opinion. By providing an understanding of the media process and how news is perceived and coverage chosen, students will gain a critical awareness of the role of the public relations practitioner within the news making process. Students will develop strong media relations techniques including writing skills, presentation skills, pitching and media/video training. Special emphasis is placed on the role of digital media and its power to influence change, and the impact of blogs and other social media. Students develop a strategic media relations campaign aimed at publicizing a product, service, idea or issue, and that uses a variety of traditional and non-traditional publicity tools and techniques.

    Prerequisite(s)/Course Notes:
    PR 102  and 103 . No liberal arts credit. May not be taken on a Pass/D+/D/Fail basis.



  
  • PR 106 - Digital Tools for Public Relations

    Semester Hours: 3


    Fall, Spring, Summer

    This course is designed to enhance students’ mastery of the digital and internet-based tools used by public relations practitioners. Public relations students will be exposed to the applications they will need to become proficient, effective communicators in the digital marketplace. Students will learn best practices and skills in social media, visual design, online audio and video content, blogs, websites, and digital analytics.

    Prerequisite(s)/Course Notes:
    PR 102  and 103 . May not be taken on a Pass/D+/D/Fail basis. No liberal arts credit. Lab fees additional.



  
  • PR 107 - Public Relations Campaigns

    Semester Hours: 3


    Fall, Spring

    In this capstone course, students will serve on a pro bono basis to develop a public relations campaign for a nonprofit client assigned by the instructor. Public relations students will combine the theory and experiential components of their previous classes and internships to provide clients with strategic planning, objectives, and identification of appropriate techniques for a successful public relations program. Working with their client, students will execute various aspects of the campaign and develop a work portfolio as they complete their public relations degree requirements.

    Prerequisite(s)/Course Notes:
    PR 101  or 102 , and 103 . No liberal arts credit. May not be taken on a Pass/D+/D/Fail basis. 



  
  • PR 109 - Advanced Writing for Public Relations and Media

    Semester Hours: 3
    This course will emphasize advanced writing skills essential to succeed in a multi-media landscape. Through reading and writing assignments, the curriculum will move students beyond the fundamentals of communications and media writing to examine business writing, presentational writing, human interest content and storytelling, editing, critical writing, op-ed, position articles, and speech writing. The course work will include writing proposals and professional documents and will emphasize storytelling using applicable and appropriate writing styles. Students will practice writing and presentation skills by presenting various projects in class.

    Prerequisite(s)/Course Notes:
    PR 103 or JRNL 011



  
  • PR 110 - Advanced Public Relations Tools

    Semester Hours: 3
    Fall, Spring, Summer
    This is an advanced course in the use of the digital and Web-based tools for the public relations practitioner. The course follows the required Public Relations Tools course (PR 106 ), which helps to ensure that PR students are exposed to the programs and skills they will need to succeed professionally. Because increasing demand for content has caused the evolution of public relations from a traditional, journalism-based practice to a complex profession requiring proficiencies in integrated marketing communications, students must become highly proficient in many of the digital and Internet-based tools available.  Students will review state-of-the-art programs and platforms, building on the information learned in the required course and expanding to include desktop design tools, video production, search engine optimization, website content management systems, and data visualization. Instruction in the use of WordPress and Adobe InDesign and Photoshop will be provided.

    Prerequisite(s)/Course Notes:
    PR 106  and a GPA of 3.0 in the major  is required. May not be taken on a Pass/D+/D/Fail basis. Not for liberal arts credit.



  
  • PR 111 - Communicating Social Responsibility

    Semester Hours: 3
    Periodically
    This course will examine Corporate Social Responsibility (CSR) and the communication challenges it presents for the public relations professional. CSR has increasingly become an integral part of building a well-respected brand and is now a critical component of all corporate communications departments. Focusing on the different aspects of CSR – including environmental accountability and sustainability, philanthropy, employee volunteerism, business ethics and good governance – this course will examine concepts and tactics public relations professionals need in order to prepare strategic communication plans that highlight CSR activities and that contribute positively to a client or employer’s global reputation. Strategies for communicating social impact for nonprofits and social enterprises will also be examined, highlighting key leaders and  organizations, and the challenges they face.

    Prerequisite(s)/Course Notes:
    May not be taken on a Pass/D+/D/Fail basis. Not for liberal arts credit. (Formerly Corporate Social Responsibility Communication Strategies.)



  
  • PR 112 - Global Public Relations

    Semester Hours: 3
    This course focuses on theories of global public relations. Students examine global theories of the role of public relations in society, including the European theory of reflective public relations, Latin American theories of social responsibility, and African communitarian theories. Additionally, they will learn and critically evaluate how the media operates and differs in regions and countries around the world.

     

    Prerequisite(s)/Course Notes:
    PR 100  



  
  • PR 113 - Pop, Rock and Public Relations

    Semester Hours: 3
    Since before the birth of rock ‘n’ roll, the off-stage public images of successful popular music artists have both benefited and suffered from the intense glare of celebrity. In this elective course, students will examine how artists have used their fame to draw attention to issues of public policy. The class will also review case studies of pop/rock artists and how they emerged or suffered from self-inflicted public relations controversies. In addition, students will discover how artists “pushed the envelope” and challenged social acceptability through their performances and personas. While attention will focus on current artists and those from the last half of the 20th century, students will explore social media’s immense impact on artists’ approach to fame, publicity and public perception; they will also introduce new artists to the class discussions and individual projects.



  
  • PR 114 - Disciplines in Public Relations

    Semester Hours: 3
    Open to PR graduating seniors only. A curriculum in public relations intends to introduce students to the broad theories and practices of the profession, and look at how public relations practitioners ply their trade in media relations, employee relations, consumer relations, and governmental relations.  This course will examine how public relations theories and tools become specialized for individual and varying disciplines. Through guest lectures, case studies, and selected readings, students will examine fields including (but not limited to) sports public relations, healthcare public relations, travel public relations, lifestyle public relations, entertainment public relations, fashion public relations and non-profit public relations.  Differences will be examined from the perspectives of the corporate, in-house and agency work environments.

    Prerequisite(s)/Course Notes:
    Open only to PR graduating seniors. (Formerly PR 180F)



  
  • PR 115 - Crisis Communication and Reputation Management

    Semester Hours: 3


    This course provides students with a comprehensive understanding of the strategies, tools, and techniques for successful reputation management and communication during crises. The course focuses on the planning and management involved in successfully creating and maintaining a positive public image in good times and in times of crisis. Students will develop strategies to create and implement a reputation management plan, learning how to effectively and proactively use traditional and social media to disseminate and manage messages that produce and reinforce reputation. Students will examine successful and poorly executed crisis communication strategies and learn how to best handle negative publicity, recognizing the potential power of emerging technologies.

    The course also examines emerging developments in reputation management and crisis communication, including the increased expectation for businesses to articulate public stances on social issues, employee and endorser criticism for such stances, and fake news.

     



  
  • PR 116 - Integrated Brand Communication

    Semester Hours: 3
    This course examines integrated communication as a strategic process through which brands seek to create and manage relationships with consumers through interactive, conversation-based engagement. The course will provide insight into consumer behavior, branding, and the comprehensive process of establishing objectives and developing tactics, and the selection and mix of media resources to achieve them. Attention will be given to the intersection and convergence of marketing, advertising, and public relations; digital displays; direct marketing; email; e-commerce; websites; search engine optimization; content marketing; mobile resources; social media; and brand management.  

    Prerequisite(s)/Course Notes:
    PR 100, MKT 101



  
  • PR 117 - Political Public Relations

    Semester Hours: 3
    This course will study how political candidates, politicians, and policy advocates communicate, including how they frame narratives about themselves and about issues, promote their candidacies, create “pseudo events,” get issues on the public agenda, advocate for and against policy ideas, and shape public opinion. We will evaluate the social impacts of these activities. We will also evaluate the social impacts of new developments in political public relations, including the use of social media by politicians and other political actors, fake news, and the increased expectation by citizens that businesses will articulate stances on political issues. Students will learn about political communication phenomena and strategies including bandwagoning, the halo effect, expectation setting, and leaks to the press.  



  
  • PR 118 - Public Relations and Persuasion

    Semester Hours: 3
    This course will analyze how ideas and behaviors become popular and spread. We will study how the public relations profession attempts to influence the thinking and behavior of individuals and groups in order to sell products and build support for political candidates, ideas, and causes. Students will learn a range of tactics and phenomena including the characteristics that make ideas influential, memorable, and viral and how public relations professionals capitalize on this knowledge to meet their goals. We will assess the ethics and social implications of the use of such strategies.



  
  • PR 119 - The Social Impact of Social Media

    Semester Hours: 3
    In recent years, social media platforms have been charged with “hacking” elections by spreading fake news; contributing to untruthful claims by politicians who circumvent fact-checkers in the traditional media in order to communicate with citizens directly; enabling trolls to viciously bully people; contributing to the decline of family conversations; allowing private data to be shared with advertisers, political consultants and hackers; making Americans more polarized because people only see information aligned with their pre-existing beliefs, and contributing to increased rates of depression in individuals who think other peoples’ lives look more glamorous online. At the same time, social media has given people powerful platforms for speaking out against injustice and organizing social movements. This class will study the social impact of social media and consider possible solutions to the challenges posed by its increased use.



  
  • PR 120 - The Swing Agency

    Semester Hours: 3
    This is a professionally driven course where students take the lead to fulfill the needs of PR clients through an interdisciplinary collaboration between The Swing Agency and the Center for Entrepreneurship. The Swing Agency is a student-led agency, providing students with experiential learning. The Center for Entrepreneurship’s partnerships with sponsored and grant-funded entrepreneur challenges and programs provides the agency with multiple clients. Students conduct research, strategy, writing, creating online content, and effective storytelling. Students are assigned agency positions, based on demonstrated communication skills and strength, to various roles and responsibilities in the professional agency infrastructure. The instructor serves as agency director supervising the agency performance, in order to facilitate agency success. Students work together both in class and outside of class to develop and launch a strategic communication campaign plan for clients, in addition to managing the day-to-day business operations of The Swing Agency.

    Prerequisite(s)/Course Notes:
    PR 103  



  
  • PR 121 - Entertainment Publicity and Promotion

    Semester Hours: 3
    This course will survey the field of entertainment public relations, emphasizing the promotion of products, including movies, television programs, radio, music, and theatre. Students will focus on audience research and the integration of marketing, publicity, and promotional fundamentals related to the entertainment industry. The discussion will include promotional tie-ins such as product integration and promotional partnerships, celebrity endorsements, and reaching influencers and critics. Students will also examine media content for bias, sensitivity, and inclusiveness. The course will emphasize how publicity campaigns are developed for various types of entertainment projects.

    Prerequisite(s)/Course Notes:
    PR 100



  
  • PR 122 - Live Event Promotion

    Semester Hours: 3
    This course will survey effective PR practice for live entertainment and performance tours and events; including musical artists, and performance shows (ex: comedy, dance, and book tours). Students will focus on media training for artists/performers/creatives, tour routing, budgeting, planning, media relations, and cross-promotion with brand merchandising. Discussion will include artist/performer/creatives brand strategy for domestic and international traditional, digital and social reach, as well as business management with entertainment venues. The course will emphasize how live, entertainment events are incorporated and coordinated into broader brand strategy for entertainment performers.



  
  • PR 131 - Sports Promotion

    Semester Hours: 3
    Once a year

    Sports public relations and communication practitioners must select the most appropriate strategies for disseminating information, managing reputations, handling crises, and nurturing a positive relationship with media and audiences to keep teams and athletes in a positive public light. This foundational course will present an overview of the elements of public relations and their unique relevance to the sports industry. The application of sports public relations tactics, including promotional media, social media, media relations, public relations campaigns, and high-level management responsibilities related to sports information, will be emphasized.

    Prerequisite(s)/Course Notes:
    PR 100



  
  
  
  • PR 170 - Public Relations Internships

    Semester Hours: 1-3


    Fall, January, Spring, Summer
    An internship experience affords students an opportunity to apply what they learn in the classroom in a professional work setting appropriate to their major field of study. Public relations majors must complete 3 s.h. of internships to be eligible for graduation.

    Prerequisite(s)/Course Notes:
    PR 100 . The internships can be at different organizations in different semesters, with the approval of the sponsoring professor. Three credit internships are reserved only for students with junior standing. Students taking the internship for 1 s.h. must work a minimum of 120 hours; students seeking to earn a 2.s.h. internship must work a minimum of 150 hours; students seeking 3 s.h. must work a minimum of 180 hours. All internships must be completed under the sponsorship of a public relations professor. Students must also complete a paper or project relevant to their work experience and fulfill other requirements as designated by the sponsoring professor. Permission of a sponsoring public relations professor is required before a student accepts an internship. May be repeated up to a total of 4 s.h. if internships are at different organizations.  Pass/Fail grade only.

     



  
  • PR 171 - Public Relations Internships

    Semester Hours: 1-3
    Fall, January, Spring, Summer
    An internship experience affords students an opportunity to apply what they learn in the classroom in a professional work setting appropriate to their major field of study. Public relations majors must complete 3 s.h. of internships to be eligible for graduation.

    Prerequisite(s)/Course Notes:
    PR 100 . PR 171 may be repeated up to 3 s.h. I The internships can be at different organizations in different semesters, with the approval of the sponsoring professor. Three credit internships are reserved only for students with junior standing. Students taking the internship for 1 s.h. must work a minimum of 120 hours; students seeking to earn a 2.s.h. internship must work a minimum of 150 hours; students seeking 3 s.h. must work a minimum of 180 hours. All internships must be completed under the sponsorship of a public relations professor. Students must also complete a paper or project relevant to their work experience and fulfill other requirements as designated by the sponsoring professor. Permission of a sponsoring public relations professor is required before a student accepts an internship. Pass/Fail grade only.



  
  • PR 180 to 189 A-Z - Special Topics

    Semester Hours: 1-4


    Periodically

    Designed to meet the needs of individual and specific groups of students interested in special topics not covered by other course offerings. As individual subjects are selected, each is assigned a letter (A-Z) and added to the course number.

    Current Special Topics

    PR 180Q - Hofstra in NYC

    This course will concentrate on various characteristics of the communication industry based in New York City including production, distribution and promotion of news and entertainment products, as well as advocacy of clients within the entertainment and information industries. Students will prepare for interactions with practitioners involved with talent and artist management, producers and creative departments, newsrooms and public relations representatives, and observe promotional synergies between corporations and production companies. The course approaches these interactions within a variety of professional settings, cultural visits, and meetings with experienced industry professionals. The course will begin in late-spring semester with four class meetings designed to inform students on the shape of these industries and prepare them for a one-week, Manhattan-based immersive experience. Student visits will include production studios, a radio station, TV and digital newsrooms, large and mid-sized public relations agencies, museums, and other related facilities. The course will incorporate readings from industry trade articles and other online resources. 

    Prerequisite(s)/Course Notes:
    Any course may be taken a number of times as long as there is a different letter designation each time it is taken. Specific titles and course descriptions for special topics courses are available in the online class schedule.  Not all Special Topics courses in Public Relations are for liberal arts credit.



  

Publishing (PUBL)

  
  • PUBL 170 - Introduction to Publishing Studies

    Semester Hours: 3
    Spring

    This course examines the full process of publishing from submission of a manuscript to its publication including the various phases of editing and production. A work project is used to illustrate the publication stages. Specialists from the publishing field address the class.

    Prerequisite(s)/Course Notes:
    WSC 001  or WSC 002 . Not for liberal arts credit. Credit given for this course or ENGL 170, not both (Formerly ENGL 170, Theory and Practice of Publishing).



  
  • PUBL 178 - Windmill: Publishing Practicum

    Semester Hours: 3
    In this capstone course for the Publishing Studies curriculum, students pursue real-time print and digital publishing projects through Windmill: The Hofstra Journal of Literature & Art.  Topics include artistic continuity, product development, and project management across both print and digital platforms.  Readings situate students’ practical experience within a larger investigation of publishing as a cultural forum.

    Prerequisite(s)/Course Notes:
    WSC 001  or WSC 002  and ENGL 172 .



 

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