May 27, 2024  
2022-2023 Undergraduate Bulletin 
    
2022-2023 Undergraduate Bulletin [ARCHIVED BULLETIN]

Course Descriptions


 

Publishing (PUBL)

  
  
  
  • PUBL 179A - Book Design and Production

    Semester Hours: 3


    Fall

    This course will explore the fundamentals of book design, production and manufacturing, including aesthetics and economic considerations. Type selection, page design, materials selection and manufacturing processes are discussed. Includes instruction and practice in the use of desktop publishing and image processing software.

    Prerequisite(s)/Course Notes:
    Not for liberal arts credit. Credit given for this course, ENGL 197V, or ENGL 179A (Formerly 178D, Desktop Publishing for Book Publishing).




Radio, Television, Film (RTVF)

  
  • RTVF 001 - Foundations of Radio, Television, Film, and New Media

    Semester Hours: 3


    Fall, Spring

    This interdisciplinary course is designed to increase the student’s understanding of how radio, television, film, and new media communicate ideas. Through a study of perceptual principles, graphic design, photography, radio and sound, film, television, and the Web, students explore the underlying forms and processes of media. The development of a critical vocabulary and an analytical perspective, together with the fundamental skills required to create various basic media projects, provide students with a foundation for pursuing further studies in mediated communication.

    Prerequisite(s)/Course Notes:
    (Formerly Sound and Image Aesthetics.)



  
  • RTVF 010 - (AA) Introduction to Cinema Studies

    Semester Hours: 3
    Fall, Spring

    This course introduces students to the film medium as an art form. The course explores a diverse range of works, dealing with concepts such as genres (for example, horror, sci-fi, the Western), national cinemas (for example, German expressionism, Italian neorealism, or French new wave), and film authorship (for example, Kubrick, Hitchcock), as well as the various aesthetic components of the medium (cinematography, mise-en-scene, editing). By learning to identify and analyze key aspects of film form and style, students become familiar with production techniques and various theories of film language, as well as cinema’s powerful influence on other visual media. Lectures and readings are combined with feature film screenings.

    Prerequisite(s)/Course Notes:
    This course is required as a prerequisite for many RTVF courses. [Formerly (AA) Introduction to Film and Television Study.]



  
  
  • RTVF 014 - Media Production Practicum

    Semester Hours: 1-2
    Application of television and film production knowledge to pre-selected department and extracurricular productions. Students are required to be available for production work beyond scheduled class time.

    Prerequisite(s)/Course Notes:
    RTVF 026  and 044 . Open only to BS in Radio, Television, Film majors. No liberal arts credit. Course is repeatable for credit; up to 6 s.h. to be applied to the BS degree. Pass/D+/D/Fail grade only.



  
  • RTVF 015 - Survey of Television and Integrated Media

    Semester Hours: 3


    Periodically

    An overview of today’s television and integrated media environments. While recognizing traditional modalities of distribution within broadcast and cable, newer forms of information and entertainment distribution technologies and associated issues are examined in historical and cultural contexts. Students will develop a critical awareness of the roles played by stakeholders, such as the public, the industry, and the government regulators in an environment of fast-paced social and technological change.

    Prerequisite(s)/Course Notes:
    May not be taken on a Pass/D+/D/Fail basis. (Formerly Survey of Electronic Media.)



  
  • RTVF 016 - Television Aesthetics and Criticism

    Semester Hours: 3


    Periodically

    This course is designed as an introduction to the critical evaluation of television storytelling modes and strategies. Through both cultural and textual analysis, students will learn the tools and concepts needed to aesthetically assess television narratives as seen in both classic and contemporary television programming.

     

    Prerequisite(s)/Course Notes:
    Admission to class by permission of the department. May not be taken on a Pass/D+/D/Fail basis.

    Students must have access to select online streaming services for the duration of the course.



  
  • RTVF 020 - Introduction to Interactive Non-Fiction

    Semester Hours: 3
    This course is designed as an introduction to emerging trends in interactive non-fiction storytelling involving user participation, navigation design, and web distribution.  Students will also learn the basics of non-linear storytelling using software for designing web multimedia.  Instruction will include hands-on exercises in navigation design, critical analysis of outstanding interactive web projects, and readings in the history, aesthetics, and challenges confronting this evolving field.

    Prerequisite(s)/Course Notes:
    This course can be taken for liberal arts credit.



  
  • RTVF 021 - Fundamentals of Digital Audio and Radio Production

    Semester Hours: 3
    Fall, Spring

    Theories and practices of basic digital audio and radio production. The course focuses on understanding attributes of sound, audio console operations (both broadcast and production), microphone design and applications, digital recording, mixing and editing with the latest production software, and working with other broadcast studio standards.  Students are required to be available for production and laboratory time beyond scheduled class time.

    Prerequisite(s)/Course Notes:
    No liberal arts credit. Admission to class by permission of the department. Lab fees additional.



  
  • RTVF 023 - Sports Radio Reporting and Production

    Semester Hours: 3
    Fall, Spring

    This course focuses on the theories and practices of radio journalism and will introduce students to the basic skills of reporting and producing radio news with an emphasis on sports reporting A wide variety of projects are intended to develop a student’s ability to produce, conceive and write sports radio newscasts, news packages, and other radio news pieces of various lengths, including live spot reports and breaking sports news stories. This course is designed to get students to think comprehensively about sports radio news and informational program production, to understand that technical proficiency, thematic clarity and journalistic integrity go hand in hand in reporting and producing sports radio news. Outside reporting time is required, with projects to be produced for WRHU and Required Radio.

    Prerequisite(s)/Course Notes:
    RTVF 021  or JRNL 015 . No liberal arts credit. Admission to class by permission of Radio, Television, Film  Department. Lab fees additional. Same as JRNL 025 .



  
  • RTVF 024 - Television Production: Multi-camera Studio

    Semester Hours: 4
    Fall, Spring

    This course focuses on all facets of studio production, with particular attention paid to the production process and creative expression. With a blending of theory and practice, students participate in television exercises and productions to learn the basic terminology, technologies, and positions associated with multi-camera productions for television and the Web. Students are required to be available for production work beyond scheduled class time. 

    Prerequisite(s)/Course Notes:
    Video/TV majors only. No liberal arts credit. Lab fees additional. (Formerly Introduction to Television: Multi-camera Production.)



  
  • RTVF 025 - Introduction to Digital Media

    Semester Hours: 3
    Fall, Spring
    An introduction to digital editing and digital media theory, creation, and management. Studies include fundamental non-linear editing techniques, basic graphic design, repurposing and manipulating aural and visual materials, digital compression and practical online distribution.  Students are required to be available for production work beyond scheduled class time. 

    Prerequisite(s)/Course Notes:
    Video/TV and Radio majors only . Lab fees additional. No liberal arts credit. May not be taken on a Pass/D+D/Fail basis.



  
  • RTVF 026 - Single-camera Television Production

    Semester Hours: 3
    Fall, Spring
    An introduction to on-location single camera television production techniques and concepts. Students will learn videography techniques, production processes and post-production methods used to create short-form programming. Emphasis will be placed on the effectiveness of overall message communication.  Students are required to be available for production work beyond scheduled class time.

    Prerequisite(s)/Course Notes:
    RTVF 025 . Video/TV majors only . No liberal arts credit. Admission to class by permission of department. Lab fees additional. (Formerly Introduction to Television: Field Production and Editing.)



  
  • RTVF 027 - Introductory Film Production

    Semester Hours: 3
    Fall, Spring
    Introduction to film production emphasizing the development of short narrative films and the use of principles of continuity filmmaking. Basic processes of how cameras work and how films are constructed from scripting through editing. Equipment is provided but students will have expenses for film and processing.

    Prerequisite(s)/Course Notes:
    RTVF 010 . Admission to class by permission of department. Lab fees additional.



  
  • RTVF 034 - Foundations of Television Writing

    Semester Hours: 3
    Fall, Spring

    This course is designed to introduce students to a writing process that they can apply to writing scripts for numerous formats of television and web media. This course will focus primarily on writing the hour-long drama and ½-hour comedy formats while also covering three-act structure, commercials, and web series. To deepen and contextualize the student’s knowledge, this class will address the historical evolution of the television writer’s role and explore career paths in writing for television. Assignments will include the various television and web formats, including complete “spec” script episodes of both a current television drama and comedy. A final group project and presentation will simulate the modern television “writer’s room” experience. This course is designed for students who are beginning their study of a wide range of media forms and have an interest in understanding the art and craft of writing for television.

    Prerequisite(s)/Course Notes:
    Video/TV  majors or Writing for the Screen  majors only. May not be taken on a Pass/D+D/Fail basis. (Formerly Foundations of Television and Web TV Writing.)



  
  • RTVF 040 - Introduction to Virtual Reality Storytelling

    Semester Hours: 3
    Periodically

    An introduction to the history, technology, and application of immersive storytelling in film/tv, journalism, and emerging platforms.  Students will be introduced to concepts of immersion and “presence” in storytelling and how modern technology builds on these age-old storytelling devices.  Students will learn how to use 360 video and interactive game design software to create prototypes for VR head-mounted displays such as Oculus Rift and to prepare for internships and advanced course offerings in this emerging field.  

    Prerequisite(s)/Course Notes:
    This course can be taken for liberal arts credit.



  
  • RTVF 041 - Feature Reporting and Production for Radio and Podcast

    Semester Hours: 3


    Fall, Spring

    Through the application of theories of digital audio production and contemporary radio reporting, students produce complex, long-form radio features reflecting the various formats of today’s diverse digital audio market, both for terrestrial broadcasts and podcasts. Students gain competency in pre-production, researching, field reporting, interviewing, and post-production, including writing and editing elaborate radio scripts. Students master the skills of editing and multi-track mixing on the latest audio software. They employ a variety of online/mobile distribution techniques and are expected to develop a social media outreach component to reach target audiences and get their work heard on a variety of platforms. Projects include the conception, writing, and production of radio features and short documentaries, many of which will be broadcast on WRHU. Students are required to be available for production and laboratory time beyond scheduled class time

    Prerequisite(s)/Course Notes:
    RTVF 021 . No liberal arts credit. Same as JRNL 026 . Admission to class by permission of Radio, Television, Film  Department. Lab fees additional.



  
  • RTVF 042 - Magazine Production for Radio and Podcast

    Semester Hours: 3


    Spring

    Through the application of theories of contemporary radio and digital audio programming and content creation, students conceptualize and produce a broad array of magazine programs reflecting the various formats of today’s diverse digital audio market, both for terrestrial broadcast and podcasts. Combining in-the-field reporting and production work, collaborative planning, and critical listening projects, students gain competency in the many areas related to the production of short- and long-form radio magazines. Students develop a thorough understanding of the links between program formats, marketing, and target audiences, and are expected to develop a social media outreach component to reach target audiences and get their work heard on a variety of platforms. Students will rotate in their roles to give them a taste of the elements of successful radio magazines and podcasts. Students must be available for production and laboratory time.

    Prerequisite(s)/Course Notes:
    RTVF 021  or JRNL 015  or by permission of Radio, Television, Film  Department. No liberal arts credit. Same as JRNL 027 . Lab fees additional.



  
  • RTVF 043 - Radio Station Imaging and Production

    Semester Hours: 3
    Fall
    This course focuses on the theories and practices of radio station imaging and production.  “Station imaging” and “creative enhancement” are general terms used to describe the elements produced internally by a radio station to promote and/or market itself.  Imaging is both an internal promotional approach, and an external marketing strategy, that refers to how a broadcaster positions its radio station within the marketplace.  Through classroom lectures, practical studio production work, and a broad array of assignments and readings, students will become familiar with the technical terms and strategic practices associated with radio station imaging.  Students will gain the skills necessary to create radio “sweepers,” music menus, and “promos” for shows, special events, and contests.  The course is designed to give students a critical appreciation for how audio elements create a particular effect, and to understand how writing and editing play a role in shaping perceptions of the listener.  Other topics include copyright restrictions, acquiring music and sound effects for productions, and developing image campaigns.  Students will produce all of the projects on advanced digital production software. 

    Prerequisite(s)/Course Notes:
    RTVF 021  or by permission of department. No liberal arts credit. Lab fees additional. May not be taken on a Pass/D+/D/Fail basis.



  
  • RTVF 044 - Advanced Television and Integrated Media Technologies

    Semester Hours: 3
    Fall, Spring
    Training and practice with advanced television and integrated media equipment consistent with current industry standards. Students will study basic engineering theory and investigate and practice core technical areas. This course provides technical preparation for intermediate and advanced television and online production work. Students are required to be available for production work beyond scheduled class time.

    Prerequisite(s)/Course Notes:
    RTVF 024 . No liberal arts credit. Admission to class by permission of department. Lab fees additional. (Formerly Advanced Television Technologies.)



  
  • RTVF 047 - Intermediate Film Production

    Semester Hours: 3


    Fall, Spring
    Advanced concepts of film production are practiced through the production of short films. Each student produces a short sound film. Color negative film stocks, multiple sound tracks and computer-based nonlinear editing is introduced.

     

    Prerequisite(s)/Course Notes:
    RTVF 027 . Admission to class by permission of department. Students are required to be available for production and laboratory time beyond the scheduled class time. Equipment is provided but students will have expenses for film and processing. Lab fees additional.



  
  • RTVF 054 - Intermediate Television Writing

    Semester Hours: 3
    This course is designed to build and hone students’ creative talents as writers of scripted television. Current television series will be analyzed and critiqued with an emphasis on the complexities of character relationships and structure. Students will explore their creative process as they identify the unique world for each show and use their own voice to build an original story within it. Students will complete a spec script for a one-hour drama, half-hour comedy, or hybrid half-hour. They will also develop an idea for an original TV series. In addition, students will be encouraged to think “outside the box” of existing programming to consider the future of the medium and the part they might play in the ever-changing world of television.

    Prerequisite(s)/Course Notes:
    RTVF 034 - Foundations of Television Writing



  
  • RTVF 060 - Documentary Film and Video Production

    Semester Hours: 3


    Fall, Spring
    Students explore various story-telling approaches in documentary filmmaking through creating production projects focusing on social, political, cultural, and personal themes. Working individually or in groups, students are guided through the conceptual and technical skills required to produce a short documentary.

     

    Prerequisite(s)/Course Notes:
    RTVF 026  or 047 . Admission to class by permission of department. Equipment is provided but students are responsible for additional production expenses. Lab fees additional.



  
  • RTVF 061 A-Z - Digital Audio Production Practicum

    Semester Hours: 1-3
    Spring

    This course includes an intensive examination ina wide range of specific digital audio production platforms. Possible topics include radio drama production, radio commercial spot production, multi-track studio recording and mixing for musical productions, and post-production sound design.

    Prerequisite(s)/Course Notes:
    RTVF 021  or permission of instructor. As each individual topic is selected, it is assigned a letter (A-Z) and added to the course number. Course may be taken a number of times as long as there is a different letter designation each time it is taken. Specific titles and course descriptions for special topics courses are available in the online class schedule. No liberal arts credit. Lab fees additional. May not be taken on a Pass/D+/D/Fail basis. (Formerly Radio Production Practicum.)



  
  • RTVF 064 - Television Production: Non-Fiction

    Semester Hours: 3
    Fall, Spring
    Studies include intermediate production techniques in studio and location environments. Students write and produce original content within a wide range of non-fiction television genres. The course combines professional production practices along with a digital post-production curriculum. Students are required to be available for production work beyond scheduled class time.
     

    Prerequisite(s)/Course Notes:
    RTVF 016 , 024 , and 026 . Additionally, Bachelor of Science students  must take RTVF 044  as a prerequisite course. No liberal arts credit. Admission to class by permission of department. Lab fees additional. (Formerly Intermediate Television Production.)



  
  • RTVF 065 A-Z - Television Production Practicum

    Semester Hours: 1-3
    Periodically
    Intensive examination of modern media and television practices. Topics reflect current and emerging industry issues, roles or technologies.

    Prerequisite(s)/Course Notes:
    Admission to class by permission of department. As each individual topic is selected, it is assigned a letter (A-Z) and added to the course number. Course may be taken a number of times as long as there is a different letter designation each time it is taken. Specific titles and course descriptions for special topics courses are available in the online class schedule. No liberal arts credit. Lab fees additional. (Formerly RTVF 065.)



  
  • RTVF 066 - Television Lighting

    Semester Hours: 1
    Fall, Spring
    This course concentrates on the aesthetic and technical considerations of the art of lighting for location and studio television production. Students will analyze and practice fundamental lighting methods for the digital camera for various television genres. Students are required to be available beyond scheduled class meetings.

    Prerequisite(s)/Course Notes:
    RTVF 044 . No liberal arts credit. Admission to class by permission of department.



  
  • RTVF 067 A-Z - Film Production Practicum

    Semester Hours: 1-3


    Periodically

    Intensive examination of modern film practices. Topics reflect current and emerging industry issues, roles or technologies. 

    Topics include:

    • RTVF 067A - Color Correction
    • RTVF 067B - Intro to 3D Animation
    • RTVF 067C - Intermediate 3D Animation
    • RTVF 067D – 2D Digital Animation
    • RTVF 067F - Visual Effects
    • RTVF 067G – Digital Storyboarding
    • RTVF 067H – Advanced Cinematography
    • RTVF 067J - Advanced Editing


    Prerequisite(s)/Course Notes:
    RTVF 010 . Admission to class by permission of department. As each individual topic is selected, it is assigned a letter (A-Z) and added to the course number. Course may be taken a number of times as long as there is a different letter designation each time it is taken. Specific titles and course descriptions for special topics courses are available in the online class schedule. No liberal arts credit. Lab fees additional.



  
  • RTVF 074 - The Television Producer

    Semester Hours: 3
    Periodically
    This course focuses on the role of the producer for television. Areas of study include concept research and development, budget and finance, writing and pitching proposals, planning pre-production, production, and post-production, and distribution. Emphasis is on the producer’s ability to guide the concept and story development of television genres through leadership, vision and creative originality. Course highlights ethics, responsible decision-making, critical thinking, organizational skills, initiative and resourcefulness.

    Prerequisite(s)/Course Notes:
    Video/TV majors only . RTVF 016  or permission of department. No liberal arts credit. May not be taken on a Pass/D+/D/Fail basis.



  
  • RTVF 080 - Experimental Film and Video Production

    Semester Hours: 3
    Fall, Spring
    Students produce and direct individual or group projects that explore issues of non-narrative and other experimental, self-expressive forms. Emphasis is on experimental combinations of image and sound and alternatives to classic Hollywood style. Equipment is provided but students will have expenses for film processing and digital media.

    Prerequisite(s)/Course Notes:
    RTVF 026  or 047 . Admission to class by permission of the department. Lab fees are additional.



  
  • RTVF 084 - Television Production: Episodic Fiction

    Semester Hours: 3
    Fall, Spring
    The study and application of advanced single-camera production and post-production methods necessary to create episodic fiction programming for television and related content platforms. Students are required to be available for production work beyond scheduled class time.

    Prerequisite(s)/Course Notes:
    RTVF 016 , 026 , and 034 . No liberal arts credit. Admission to class by permission of department chairperson. Lab fee additional. (Formerly Advanced Single Camera Production.)



  
  • RTVF 085 - Television Sports Reporting and Producing

    Semester Hours: 3
    Fall, Spring
    Students will report, shoot, write and edit stories about sports events and figures, primarily on the Hofstra campus. The focus will be on developing story ideas and then producing television sports features and profiles as well as providing game coverage. Students will also be required to assist in the production of the sports segment of a weekly newscast.)

    Prerequisite(s)/Course Notes:
    RTVF 064  or JRNL 016 . Lab fee additional. Same as JRNL 074 . May not be taken on a Pass/D+/D/Fail basis.



  
  • RTVF 090 - Acting for the Camera

    Semester Hours: 3
    Periodically
    This course focuses on the processes and techniques used in preparing and acting in front of the camera. The course includes individual and group scene study, single- and multi-camera production techniques, and critical text analyses. For students planning to work as actors, this course provides insights into working with directors and within a “camera” environment. For students planning to work behind the camera, this course provides useful insights for working with actors. Substantive written critical evaluations are required. Students are required to attend rehearsals and production calls outside of scheduled class hours.

    Prerequisite(s)/Course Notes:
    RTVF 024 . Admission to class by permission of department. Same as DRAM 169A .



  
  • RTVF 091 - Voice Performance for Radio and Digital Audio

    Semester Hours: 3
    Theories and practices of multiple announcing formats for radio and digital audio. The course includes analyzing, scripting, and performing the following: podcasts, audio drama productions, various DJ formats, news, commercial, and noncommercial spot reads. Content includes audio applications ranging from broadcast radio to podcasts.

    Prerequisite(s)/Course Notes:
    RTVF 021 . Admission to class by permission of department. No liberal arts credit. (Formerly Radio Announcing.)



  
  • RTVF 094 - Television Performing

    Semester Hours: 3
    Once a Year
    This course emphasizes the development of the student’s on-camera “personality” and rhetorical talents through presentations of newscasts, sportscasts, interviews, panel discussions and other television forms. Presentations are recorded, analyzed and critiqued by instructor and peers.

    Prerequisite(s)/Course Notes:
    No liberal arts credit. Admission to class by permission of department.



  
  • RTVF 100 - Principles of Digital Editing

    Semester Hours: 3
    Periodically
    A post-production course introducing television and film students to the theories and concepts of digital nonlinear editing using Avid and/or other digital editing systems. Through screenings, lectures, discussions and demonstrations, students learn basic editing concepts, styles, and methods of accomplishing various editing tasks.

    Prerequisite(s)/Course Notes:
    RTVF 026  or 047 . No liberal arts credit. Admission to class by permission of department. Lab fees additional.



  
  
  • RTVF 106 - Advanced Editing for Television

    Semester Hours: 3
    Fall
    Students will further their postproduction skills through the study and practice of advanced effects editing, graphic design and digital audio workflows. These techniques will help enhance their creative aesthetic and the development of an individual editing style, particularly as applied to short-form television content. Students are required to be available for production work beyond scheduled class time.

    Prerequisite(s)/Course Notes:
    RTVF 026  or permission of instructor. No liberal arts credit. Lab fees additional. (Formerly Advanced Television: Post-Production.)



  
  • RTVF 107 - Cinematography and Lighting for Film

    Semester Hours: 3
    Fall, Spring
    This course combines the theoretical and practical elements of cinematography and lighting. While learning the techniques of studio and location lighting, students also study historical and contemporary trends and styles. Students learn how to visualize the script and light for the actors. Film emulsions, exposure, filters, camera placement, composition, movement, and continuity will be covered. Emphasis is placed on the importance of light to telling a story. Practical tests and scenes are shot on 16mm film stocks.

    Prerequisite(s)/Course Notes:
    RTVF 027 . Admission to class by permission of department. Lab fee additional. No liberal arts credit.  May not be taken on a Pass/D+/D/Fail basis.



  
  • RTVF 110 - Introduction to Screenwriting

    Semester Hours: 3
    Fall, Spring, Summer
    This course introduces students to the basic principles of telling stories for the screen with an emphasis on concept development and the crafting of original ideas, as well as the structural foundations of premise, character and plot. Students will learn formatting, treatment writing, and become familiar with industry-standard scriptwriting programs. The course will culminate in the completion of a polished short screenplay.

    Prerequisite(s)/Course Notes:
    RTVF 010 . Admission to class by permission of department.



  
  • RTVF 111 - Writing for Radio and Digital Audio

    Semester Hours: 3


    Fall

    This course examines the writing approaches applied for all radio platforms: terrestrial (AM and FM) and digital, including podcasts for both commercial and non-commercial formats. It also includes the writing skills necessary for the multimedia content of websites that now accompany radio promotion and distribution. Projects include writing for news, commentary, feature writing, drama, commercial and noncommercial spot writing, podcasts, and interactive audio and video applications

    Prerequisite(s)/Course Notes:
    WSC 001 , 002 ; RTVF 021 . Admission to class by permission of department. (Formerly Writing for Radio.)



  
  • RTVF 114 A-Z - Advanced Television Writing

    Semester Hours: 3
    Periodically
    This course provides students with an opportunity to develop and write a sample script for an established program as well as a script for an original program. To deepen and contextualize the student’s knowledge of this genre, the course analyzes a series of classic radio and television programs spanning more than five decades. Students participate in the brainstorming of script ideas, analyzing and rewriting of early drafts, creating show rundowns and outlines, and polishing dialogue and characterization. At the heart of this collaborative writing process lies the most critical responsibility of a professional television writer — listening and providing feedback to other writers, pitching original story ideas, and the craft of collaboration to solve story problems.

    Prerequisite(s)/Course Notes:
    RTVF 024 , 026  and 034 .   Permission of department chairperson. May not be taken on a Pass/D+/D/Fail basis. As each individual topic is selected, it is assigned a letter (A-Z) and added to the course number.  Course may be taken a number of times as long as there is a different letter designation each time it is taken.  Specific titles and course descriptions for special topics are available in the online course schedule. (Formerly RTVF 114, Advanced Television Writing: The Sitcom.)



  
  • RTVF 115 - “Color” TV: A Seminar

    Semester Hours: 3
    “Color TV” is a seminar on the new wave of US television shows featuring writers and creators of color - women, men, LGBTQ+ - identifying - who have broken barriers of tokenized representations and become central to the creative process.  In addition to offering a study of complex storylines arising from this shift, students will also explore how show creators contend with strategies of “accommodation” and “mainstreaming” within the economics of commercial television work. Finally, we will examine how subscription-based global streaming networks such as Netflix and Amazon Prime allow access to narratives from diverse creators, countries, and languages.  While the focus of our study is television programs written and produced in the US, we are interested in the interaction between these convergent streams of television storytelling.  

    Prerequisite(s)/Course Notes:
    RTVF 016 or RTVF 034



  
  • RTVF 118 - Advanced Screenwriting I

    Semester Hours: 3
    Fall
    This course will focus on the process of writing a feature-length screenplay. Students will learn how to develop ideas, pitch them effectively, and use the elements of premise, character, and plot structure to tell their stories. Students will develop their concepts, write both long and short treatments, create a detailed scene outline, and complete the first act (about 30 pages) of their original feature-length idea. Upon successful completion of the course, students may register for RTVF 119  and complete their full-length screenplay.

    Prerequisite(s)/Course Notes:
    RTVF 110  or permission of the department. May not be taken on a Pass/D+/D/Fail basis.



  
  • RTVF 119 - Advanced Screenwriting II

    Semester Hours: 3
    Spring

    In this course, students complete the feature-length screenplay they began in RTVF 118  by first re-examining and revising what they have written. They then continue to finish a complete first draft followed by a polished second draft. While writing, students will further their storytelling skills and deepen their understanding of premise, character, and plot structure through lectures, readings, screenings, and in-class critiques. Students will also master script formatting with industry-standard software, writing a compelling treatment, and giving a professional pitch.

    Prerequisite(s)/Course Notes:
    RTVF 118  or permission of the department. May not be taken on a Pass/D+/D/Fail basis.



  
  • RTVF 120 - Sound Design for Film

    Semester Hours: 3
    Fall, Spring

    This class will explore sound design from historical, technological, and practical perspectives. Students will screen examples of professional sound design to give students the opportunity to learn from the work of classic and contemporary filmmakers. Screenings will be related to developing their work through discussion, analysis, and consideration of technical and creative choices made by filmmakers to achieve their goals as storytellers. The course will introduce students to the tools of the sound designer through lectures and by participating in numerous exercises, quizzes, and projects. They will become experienced with the theory and profession of creating sound for a film from the conception stage, the recording and initial editing, and the final mix of their projects. By becoming familiar with and using the tools of the sound recordist/designer (microphones, recorders, pro-tools) in practical and creative ways, students will gain familiarity and confidence in the process that students will carry into their professional careers.  

    Prerequisite(s)/Course Notes:
    RTVF 021  or 047 . No liberal arts credit. Lab fees additional. May not be taken on a Pass/D+/D/Fail basis.



  
  • RTVF 121 - Audio Radio Programming and Distribution

    Semester Hours: 3
    Periodically

    Students explore the many contemporary manifestations of the radio medium in the 21st century. Through lectures, readings, and creative projects, students examine the transformations in traditional AM and FM terrestrial/broadcast radio. Students become familiar with HD radio, satellite radio, Internet radio, podcasts, and the wide array of audio services delivered through “apps” on mobile digital devices. The course includes a strong emphasis on writing and design for these platforms, and students will develop content for online programming platforms.

    Prerequisite(s)/Course Notes:
    RTVF 021  or permission of department. (Formerly RTVF 061C.)



  
  • RTVF 127 - Introduction to Animation Techniques

    Semester Hours: 3
    Periodically
    This course introduces techniques for developing and producing animated films, with an emphasis on creative content, experimentation, and critical thinking. Techniques covered will include a range of 2-D animation styles including collage, 3-D figure, hand-drawn, and cel. Computer-based methods are also explored, employing digital tools, such as Giotto and Adobe After Effects. Students complete several projects throughout the semester, starting with flip-books, and culminating in a final short that incorporates animation techniques along with sound design. While technique forms the basis for the learning curve in this course, students are encouraged to plumb the wide range of animation styles to develop their own visual aesthetic and voice. Assigned readings deepen an understanding of popular commercial animation and open doors to other forms, such as experimental, political, and film as art.

    Prerequisite(s)/Course Notes:
    RTVF 026  or 027 . Lab fees additional. May not be taken on a Pass/D+/D/Fail basis.



  
  • RTVF 128 - Screenwriting Seminar

    Semester Hours: 1-3


    Fall, Spring

    Intensive seminar in which students will develop the craft and critical aesthetics of writing screenplays for various film types and genres. Students will also engage in rigorous explorations of the functions of dialogue, visual translation, suspense and narrative structure. Topics include: 

    • Literary Adaptation
    • Writing Dialogue
    • Writing Comedy and Satire
    • Horror and the Fantastique
    • Science Fiction
    • Personal Narrative
    • The Revision Process


    Prerequisite(s)/Course Notes:
    Prerequisite: RTVF 110 . Admission to class by permission of the department. May be repeated for credit when subject matter varies. 



  
  • RTVF 129 - Script Analysis

    Semester Hours: 3
    Periodically
    This course will explore the art and craft of screenwriting through an in-depth analysis of dramatic structure by studying predominant theories and applying them to professional screenplays. By the end of the course, students will be familiar with premise and meaning, character development, effective use of dialogue and imagery, genre, and act-structure and come away with an understanding of story that will strengthen their skills in all areas of filmmaking.
     

    Prerequisite(s)/Course Notes:
    RTVF 010 . May not be taken on a Pass/D+/D/Fail basis.



  
  • RTVF 131 - Contemporary Issues in Radio and Digital Audio

    Semester Hours: 3
    Periodically

    This course uses a cultural studies frame to examine the major social, economic, and political developments shaping the radio broadcasting and digital audio industry today. Through analysis of historic and current radio trends, students will explore a range of issues, from social media to political talk radio, media consolidation, to constraints on localism, race and gender representation to public interest programming content, and the future of radio and digital audio in our communication ecosystem.

    Prerequisite(s)/Course Notes:
    RTVF 001  or permission of department. (Formerly Contemporary Issues in Radio Broadcasting.)



  
  • RTVF 134 - The Television Industry

    Semester Hours: 3
    Once a Year

    This course focuses on the contemporary television industry, including broadcast, cable, satellite, and online. It examines management structures, ownership patterns, and multiple media platforms, while exploring current industry trends; programming and audience research; syndication; promotions; and legal, ethical, and social issues faced by media organizations in today’s media saturated environment.

    Prerequisite(s)/Course Notes:
    RTVF 016 . Admission to class by permission of the department. No liberal arts credit.



  
  
  
  
  • RTVF 139 - Film Theory

    Semester Hours: 3
    Periodically
    Study of the various theoretical approaches of how cinema relates to society and the individual. In addition to the classic film theories of Arnheim and Eisenstein, among others, and Bazin’s and Kracauer’s concepts of film realism, the course confronts issues such as Marxism, feminism, and structuralism and introduces new theoretical concepts as they develop.

    Prerequisite(s)/Course Notes:
    RTVF 010 .



  
  • RTVF 144 - Television Production: The Sitcom

    Semester Hours: 3
    Fall
    The art and style of the television situation comedy and the processes involved in producing and directing television programming in various comedic genres.  Emphasis on creativity, leadership, and execution essential to the making of television comedy. Students are required to be available beyond scheduled class time.

    Prerequisite(s)/Course Notes:
    RTVF 084 . No liberal arts credit. Lab fees are additional. (Formerly Television Directing.)



  
  • RTVF 145 - Television Production: Media Action Projects (MAP)

    Semester Hours: 3
    Spring
    Design and development of communication systems for non-broadcast purposes. This course focuses on writing, researching, planning, and producing programs for nonprofit and community-based organizations with specific needs and audiences. Working with clients, students develop an understanding of how media productions can assist in community outreach and action.

    Prerequisite(s)/Course Notes:
    RTVF 064 . No liberal arts credit. Admission to class by permission of department. Lab fees additional. [Formerly Advanced Television: Media Action Projects Hofstra (MAP Hofstra).]



  
  • RTVF 147 - Directing for the Screen

    Semester Hours: 3


    Periodically

    The film director’s creative vision provides the unifying principle in the process of making a film while they collaborate with the many creative talents involved in production. Directors need to know what story they want to tell and must understand the aesthetics and techniques that can be used to best convey that story to an audience. Students will perform exercises and create projects that focus on script analysis, cinematography, production design, working with actors, casting and editing. Students will also analyze the work of several directors through clips screened in class and through an assigned research paper.

    Prerequisite(s)/Course Notes:
    RTVF 010 , 027  and 047 . Admission to class by permission of department. May not be taken on a Pass/D+/D/Fail basis. Lab fees additional.

     



  
  • RTVF 148 - Producing the Motion Picture

    Semester Hours: 3
    Periodically
    This course is an examination of the methods and procedures for producing a professional motion picture. It focuses on all phases of the process, including financing, development, pre-production, production, post production, distribution and marketing. Students learn the principles and methods involved in screenplay evaluation, budgeting, creation of standard deal memos, negotiating union and non-union contracts, producing standard industry paperwork and accounting procedures. Students also explore strategies and parameters for negotiating foreign and domestic theatrical distribution, cable, Internet, music, DVD and auxiliary rights.

    Prerequisite(s)/Course Notes:
    RTVF 010 . No liberal arts credit. Lab fees additional.



  
  • RTVF 149 - The Art of Film Editing

    Semester Hours: 3
    Fall, Spring
    This course aims to instruct students in the advanced concepts, theories and aesthetics of editing through readings, writing and practical editing assignments. Since the film editor, along with the director, is a principal collaborator in the authoring of a film, the first part of this course will explore the way in which early filmmakers of the silent period developed a language and syntax for film primarily through the art of editing. In the second half of the course, students will learn how film language and syntax have a primary focus in the process of filmmaking, as the editor reconstructs the cinematic time and space that was fragmented by the method by which films are shot. Students will learn to use narrative editing strategies including rhythm, pacing, point-of-view, screen direction, matching cuts, script analysis and communication with collaborators. The course emphasizes filmic storytelling and the use of editing for narrative and expressive purposes. 

    Prerequisite(s)/Course Notes:
    RTVF 010 , 027  and 047 . Lab fees additional. May not be taken on a Pass/D+/D/Fail basis. May not be repeated for credit.



  
  • RTVF 150 - Independent Studies/Readings

    Semester Hours: 1-3
    Fall, Spring, Summer
    Individualized courses designed to fill gaps in the student’s knowledge of radio, television, and/or film. Subjects should be significantly different from and/or build on course work covered in other RTVF courses taken.   

    Prerequisite(s)/Course Notes:
    Permission of department chairperson. May not be taken on a Pass/D+/D/Fail basis. Ordinarily open to seniors in the Department of Radio, Television, Film  who are exceptionally capable of independent work.  Before registering for this course, the prospective student must find a member of the department who will agree, in writing, to serve as instructor. A proposal, including a detailed description of the subject matter and outcomes, must be developed in advance of registration, ideally in the semester before the course is taken.



  
  • RTVF 151 - Independent Studies/Readings

    Semester Hours: 1-3
    Fall, Spring, Summer
    Individualized courses designed to fill gaps in the student’s knowledge of audio, video, or film.

    Prerequisite(s)/Course Notes:
    Permission of department chairperson. May not be taken on a Pass/D+/D/Fail basis. Ordinarily open to seniors in the Department of Radio, Television, Film  who are exceptionally capable of independent work. Students majoring in the BA in Media Arts program should incorporate two or three areas studied within the discipline and should demonstrate the student’s ability to relate one discipline to another. Before registering for this course, the prospective student must find a member of the department who will agree, in writing, to serve as instructor.



  
  • RTVF 152 - The Radio Industry in the Digital Age

    Semester Hours: 3
    Spring

    The course highlights organizational, technological, and ethical issues facing the radio industry today in our contemporary digital media world. Students study and explore current principles and practices of radio programming, marketing and sales, promotions, radio management for commercial and public radio, and current digital audio platforms such as podcasts and Internet radio.

    Prerequisite(s)/Course Notes:
    RTVF 001  or permission of department. Not for liberal arts credit. May not be taken on a Pass/D+/D/Fail basis. (Formerly The Radio Industry.)



  
  • RTVF 154 A-Z - Television Shows & Showrunners

    Semester Hours: 3


    Periodically

    Through lectures, readings, screenings, and critical, historical, and aesthetic analyses, students will study innovative and influential television programming and their showrunners. The term “showrunner” has recently come into usage to describe the individual who is most responsible for the creative style and content of a television show. In each offering, the course will choose from an aggregate body of noteworthy television shows and series, and a large collection of primary creative producers/showrunners. Through this singular focus, students will gain a heightened understanding and appreciation of the creative aspects of television storytelling methods. Students are expected to have access to streaming content sources in order to view and analyze pertinent programming outside of the classroom.

     

    Current Special Topics

    RTVF 154: TV Shows & Showrunners: Fleabag

    RTVF 154 Shows & Show Runners offering will focus on award-winning creator Phoebe Waller-Bridge and her groundbreaking TV comedy-drama, ‘Fleabag’ a show about a woman living in London grappling with family, love, sex, and loss. Phoebe Waller-Bridge writes, “I looked down into the abyss and at the bottom of it was Fleabag looking up at me, in lipstick. Her attitude. Her humor. Her ability to sum a person up and eviscerate them with a single, brutal insight is what drove me to write her. She said the unsayable, but it was the truth, albeit bent with cruelty”. We will begin by examining the show in its original form as a play and follow its evolution as a TV series that ages well. We will explore other series by Phoebe Waller-Bridge, such as ‘Crashing’ and ‘Killing Eve,’ to understand the breadth of her.

     

     

    Prerequisite(s)/Course Notes:
    RTVF 016 . May be repeated for credit when subject matter varies.



  
  • RTVF 157 - Film Genres

    Semester Hours: 3


    Fall, Spring 

    Studies of genre cinema emphasize critical, historical, and aesthetic analyses of significant types of motion pictures. Possible topics include, but are not limited to film comedy, the Western, melodrama, the musical, science fiction, and animated film.

    Current Offerings

    RTVF 157-Film Genre:

     

    Prerequisite(s)/Course Notes:
    RTVF 010 . May be repeated for credit when subject matter varies.



  
  • RTVF 158 - Film Authorship

    Semester Hours: 3


    Fall, Spring 

    Studies of the concepts of film authorship and the auteur theory as applied to the work of particular directors and other filmmaking personnel. Possible topics include the films of Hitchcock, Truffaut, Bergman, or Kubrick, among others; the star as auteur; and the producer or studio as auteur.

    Current Offerings

     


    Prerequisite(s)/Course Notes:
    RTVF 010 . May be repeated for credit when subject matter varies.



  
  • RTVF 161 - Advanced Digital Audio Production

    Semester Hours: 3
    Spring
    Theories and practices of advanced digital audio production techniques. Course includes conceptualizing, producing, directing, recording, editing and mixing multi-track digital audio projects. Students are required to be available for production and laboratory time beyond scheduled class time.

    Prerequisite(s)/Course Notes:
    RTVF 041  or permission of instructor. No liberal arts credit. Lab fees additional. (Formerly Advanced Audio Production.)



  
  
  
  • RTVF 167 - Advanced Film Production

    Semester Hours: 3
    Fall, Spring

    Students participate in a group production of an original student-scripted film. Students will cover every phase from the story conference through final-edited print in this course. Emphasis is placed on making aesthetic decisions in creating a short narrative film as part of this course. Each student will learn all the film production process functions, including cinematography, sound, and editing, but master one during production and post-production. Equipment is provided, but students will be expected to cover expenses for all other aspects of production.

    Prerequisite(s)/Course Notes:
    RTVF 047 . Admission to class by permission of department. No liberal arts credit. Lab fees additional. May not be taken on a Pass/D+/D/Fail basis.



  
  • RTVF 168A - Senior Film Projects I

    Semester Hours: 3
    Fall
    Approaching film as a unique means of aesthetic expression, students will begin the process of creating a short narrative film.  They will write an original screenplay and develop pre-production materials including a director’s statement, schedule and budget.  In addition, each student will be expected to achieve proficiency in key areas of film production including cinematography, sound recording and editing. 

    Prerequisite(s)/Course Notes:
    RTVF 047 , 110 .  Admission to class by permission of department. Lab fees additional. No liberal arts credit.  May not be taken on a Pass/D+/D/Fail basis. Note:  This course is the first half of a one-year sequence that continues with RTVF 168B  in the spring.  Credit for this course is only awarded upon completion of RTVF 168B .



  
  • RTVF 168B - Senior Film Projects II

    Semester Hours: 3


    Spring
    Students will continue the process of creating a short film, which began in RTVF 168A . In this course, students will direct, edit, and exhibit their film. In addition, they will be required to participate as part of the production crew for other class films. Equipment is provided but students will be expected to cover additional expenses for all other aspects of production.

     

    Prerequisite(s)/Course Notes:
    RTVF 168A . Admission to class by permission of department. Lab fees additional. No liberal arts credit. May not be taken on a Pass/D+/D/Fail basis. Note: This course may only be taken as the second half of a one-year sequence that begins with RTVF 168A  in the fall. Credit for RTVF 168A  is awarded upon successful completion of this course. (Formerly 168, Senior Film Projects.)



  
  • RTVF 170 - Internship Program

    Semester Hours: 1-3
    Fall, January, Spring, Summer
    An internship program provides an opportunity for students to apply their classroom experience to an appropriate professional work setting. Students work with an assigned faculty sponsor and an on-site supervisor. They work a requisite number of hours, keep a daily journal, and write midterm and final papers.

    Prerequisite(s)/Course Notes:
    Junior class standing or permission of department; GPA of 2.5 or better overall, the successful completion of 12 s.h. in the major, of which 6 s.h. must be in-residence; and an intermediate level course in the major. Pass/D+/D/Fail grade only. Students must be approved for admission into the program before registering. Applications to the program, with information about deadlines, are available in the Radio, Television, Film  Department. May be repeated for a total of 6 s.h. RTVF 170 and RTVF 174  can be taken in combination for no more than 6 credits. If enrolled in RTVF 144 , 145 , and/or 164 , this course can only be enrolled in for a maximum of one credit.



  
  • RTVF 174 - RTVF Career Development

    Semester Hours: 1
    A course in which RTVF majors learn to apply the liberal arts outcomes (e.g., communication skills, critical thinking, problem solving) to career transforming habits.  Students will develop connections between tenets of communications practice and liberal arts knowledge, skills and abilities.  Students will expand their professionalism, relationship-building, self-assessment and career development skills and manage their career with techniques for lifelong growth and learning, while enhancing more immediate needs such as internships and first-employment.

    Prerequisite(s)/Course Notes:
    RTVF Majors Only . No liberal arts credit.  



  
  
  • RTVF 178 - Film Studies Thesis

    Semester Hours: 3
    Periodically

    In this course, students will be introduced to advanced concepts in film studies, including academic research methods and historiography applicable to the study of film. Students will be expected to demonstrate a thorough understanding of the various paradigms and approaches to film study culminating in the production of a substantial thesis paper, which must be presented for defense.

    Prerequisite(s)/Course Notes:
    RTVF 137A , 137B , 139 , 157 , 158 . May not be taken on a Pass/D+/D/Fail basis.



  
  • RTVF 180 to 189 A-Z - Special Topics

    Semester Hours: 1-3


    Periodically
    Designed to meet the needs of individual and specific groups of students interested in special topics not covered by other course offerings. As individual subjects are selected, each is assigned a letter (A-Z) and added to the course number. Any course may be taken a number of times as long as there is a different letter designation each time it is taken.

    Current Special Topics

    RTVF 184A: The Writer’s Room

    This course focuses on the skills needed to work effectively in a Television writers’ room. The class itself will act as a writers’ room, allowing students to experience the process of pitching ideas, writing scripts, revising material, and collaborating with a team of writers in an authentic setting. Areas of study include writing, pitching, revising work based on notes, efficiently and productively pitching to improve the script, collaborating with other writers, and finding one’s voice/persona in a group. The course will also give each student a chance to learn leadership skills by guiding the group creatively as they “run the room.” Prerequisite: RTVF34 or permission of department. No liberal arts credit. May not be taken on a Pass/D+/D/Fail basis.

    Prerequisite(s)/Course Notes:
    Specific titles and course descriptions for special topics courses are available in the online class schedule.



  

Reading (READ)

  

Rehabilitation Counseling (REHB)

  
  • REHB 175 - Introduction to Rehabilitative Services

    Semester Hours: 3
    Fall, Spring
    This course provides an overview of rehabilitation services including the philosophy, principles, and structure of the rehabilitation process. Students will learn about the impact of disability from a psychological, social, and vocational point of view. Students will also learn about the similarities and differences among allied health and human service professionals, as well as how rehabilitation professionals work as part of an interdisciplinary team. Traditional academic study will be augmented by community-based activities in the Long Island and Metro NYC area, as well as experiential learning activities and guest lecturers.



  
  • REHB 180 to 189 A-Z - Special Topics

    Semester Hours: 1-3
    Periodically
    Specific courses designed to explore emerging topics in rehabilitation counseling.

    Prerequisite(s)/Course Notes:
    As individual subjects are selected, each is assigned a letter (A-Z) and added to the course number. Any course may be taken a number of times so long as there is a different letter designation each time it is taken. Specific titles and course descriptions for special topics courses are available in the online class schedule.




Religion (RELI)

  
  • RELI 010 - (HP) What Is Religion?

    Semester Hours: 3
    Fall, Spring, Summer
    This course is designed to introduce students to the academic study of religion. Students will be introduced to some of the methodological tools scholars use to think critically and constructively about religious traditions. It also provides an opportunity to learn about the historical, scriptural, ritual and theological claims of at least two distinct religious traditions. In this way students gain concrete information about the way religious beliefs and practices shape the world. Students are introduced to how scholars study religious traditions in a pluralistic context and are afforded opportunities to practice their own skills at orally communicating academic approaches to the study of religion in a pluralistic world. 



  
  
  
  
  • RELI 013 - (HP) From Flesh to Faith: Community and Conflict in the New Testament

    Semester Hours: 3
    Fall, Spring
    This course examines ways that early Christian faith(s) developed in the first century (including views of Jesus’ humanity and divinity, portrayals of the Virgin Mary, the relationship of Judaism to Christianity, and the roles of women in the church). Students will read the New Testament alongside non-canonical early Christian writings to develop an appreciation for the diversity of early Christian belief and practice. Students will come to know the content and themes of each of the New Testament writings, to identify different literary portrayals of Jesus, to work with establishing criteria for establishing the historical Jesus, to recognize important differences in early Christian belief, and to be familiar with the development of Christian orthodoxy. 



  
  • RELI 014F - (CC, HP) First-Year Seminar

    Semester Hours: 3-4


    Fall

    This course gives first-year students the opportunity to work in a seminar format with a member of the faculty in an area of the faculty member’s research interests.

    Prerequisite(s)/Course Notes:
    The course is open to first-year students only. Topics vary by semester. This course is offered for distribution credit; consult the Semester Planning Guide for proper category listing. Students may take only one 14F or 12F seminar and only one 014S or 012S seminar.



  
  • RELI 014S - First-Year Seminar

    Semester Hours: 3-4


    Spring

    This course gives first-year students the opportunity to work in a seminar format with a member of the faculty in an area of the faculty member’s research interests.

    Prerequisite(s)/Course Notes:
    The course is open to first-year students only. Topics vary by semester. This course is offered for distribution credit; consult the Semester Planning Guide for proper category listing. Students may take only one 014F or 012F seminar and only one 014S or 012S seminar.



  
  
  
  • RELI 017 - (HP) Lost Christianities

    Semester Hours: 3
    Periodically
    This course explores the varieties of Christianity that co-existed from Jesus’ death in the middle of the first century through the end of the second century.  Included in these are Jewish-Christians, Marcionites, Montanists, and Gnostics.  Students will read a variety of primary texts in translation to understand better the struggle between forms of early Christianity and the way that one form became dominant and, thus, “orthodox.”



  
  • RELI 018 - (HP) What Is Catholicism?

    Semester Hours: 3
    Periodically
    There are many versions of the branch of Christianity called “Catholicism,” and many ways people throughout history have practiced it. This class asks what various Catholic communities have meant by the word “Catholic,” explorers its major global varieties and common contested characteristics, and studies aspects from theology and ethics to history and popular culture.

    Prerequisite(s)/Course Notes:
    (Formerly (HP) Sacraments, Sex and the City: An Introduction to Catholicism.)



  
  • RELI 019 - (CC) Introduction to Buddhism

    Semester Hours: 3
    Once a Year
    This course is an introduction to the wide range of Buddhist ideas and practices that have developed within the diverse regions of Asia, with focus on southern Asia. This course will also introduce students to the various Buddhist literary and artistic expressions. The course covers a wide range of Buddhist traditions (Theravada, Mahayana, Vajrayana), as well as a discussion of Buddhism’s transfer from Asia to the West.



  
  • RELI 020 - (HP) Magic, Miracle, and Medicine in the Greco-Roman World

    Semester Hours: 3
    Periodically
    The interrelated concepts of magic, miracle (religion), and medicine in antiquity have long been topics of great interest and debate among scholars of antiquity. Magical incantations, for example, may appear to be similar to prayers, and physicians in antiquity might act like magicians. This course explores these – and many other related – issues in an attempt to identify, where possible, social constructions of the categories of magic, miracle, and medicine, and the prejudices that accompanied them.



  
  • RELI 021 - (HP) Gods and Sages - Religious Wisdom in the Ancient World

    Semester Hours: 3
    Periodically
    This course will examine ancient approaches to questions about the human condition and attempts to come to know the good, the true and the beautiful. Religious and philosophic thought provided distinct, often conflicting, but at times overlapping answers to such issues. A study of these various theories, as addressed by thinkers from the Greco-Roman traditions, will not only introduce some of the most profound meditations on these central human concerns, but will also provide the conceptual background necessary to understand the development of Western religious traditions (particularly Christianity and Rabbinic Judaism).
     



  
  • RELI 022 - (IS, CC) What is Judaism?

    Semester Hours: 3
    The course introduces students to major themes in the study of Jewish experiences throughout the world and serves as an overview of the field. During the semester, we will explore the following questions: What is Judaism? What is a Jewish Text? What is a Jewish Context? and What are Jewish Studies? Students will end the course with knowledge and tools to explore the diversity of Jewish experiences in diverse geographical regions and through multiple disciplinary lenses from the social sciences and humanities.



  
  • RELI 026 - (IS) Mindful America

    Semester Hours: 3
    Once a Year
    This course will introduce students to the diverse forms in which Buddhism has emerged in America. It will explore how American Buddhism is lived by immigrants as well as by American converts and will integrate insider and outsider accounts with historical and ethnographic approaches.

    Prerequisite(s)/Course Notes:
    (Formerly Buddhism in America.)



 

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