Apr 21, 2024  
2022-2023 Undergraduate Bulletin 
    
2022-2023 Undergraduate Bulletin [ARCHIVED BULLETIN]

Course Descriptions


 

Writing Studies and Composition (WSC)

  
  
  • WSC 121 - (AA) The Story of Writing

    Semester Hours: 3


    Periodically

    This course explores the various ways humans write and have written since the beginning of writing.  In short, this is a survey of the practical methods or systems of meaningful inscriptions – knife, brush, quill, paint, ink, pencil, print, and pixel — and of the sites of writing itself — clay, animal skin, parchment, linen, wood pulp and cyberspace.  By studying the material origins of writing, students will come to understand how the making of writing simplifies and complicates communication.

     


    Prerequisite(s)/Course Notes:
    WSC 001 , or permission of the instructor.



  
  • WSC 122 - (AA) Digital Research and Writing

    Semester Hours: 3
    Periodically
    This course explores how learners and researchers decide which Web sources and information are reliable, valid, and appropriate for specific purposes and audiences, as it investigates the meanings of literacies in the digital age. Students may compose in multiple media.

    Prerequisite(s)/Course Notes:
    Prerequisite or corequisite: WSC 001 , or permission of instructor.



  
  • WSC 123 - (AA) Writing the Past in the Present: Nostalgia Through Humor and Mourning

    Semester Hours: 3
    Periodically
    This class will examine various manifestations of nostalgia: electronic, written, visual, classical and popular. We will seek out sites of collective and individual memorials in movies, the web, music and classical texts. Additionally, we will read critical essays that address nostalgia as an academic subject. Ultimately, students will produce a “nostalgia project” that might take any number of forms, but must be defended as a site of memory.

    Prerequisite(s)/Course Notes:
    Prerequisite or corequisite: WSC 001 , or permission of the instructor.



  
  • WSC 124 - (CP) Digital Compositions

    Semester Hours: 3


    Periodically

    This course introduces students to principles of effective writing in digital environments. Contemporary writers compose by using a variety of platforms to produce different forms – blogs, emails, slide shows, videos, audio documentaries, tweets, websites, and much more.  Contemporary writers need to be mindful of not just how to compose on digital platforms but what these digital forms afford.  This course challenges students to learn technical skills and critical understanding. Students will study and design Web-based projects that seek to effect change in their local or networked environments.  Students will research the impact of digital communication on social media audiences in order to produce effective digital compositions.

    Prerequisite(s)/Course Notes:
    Prerequisite or corequisite: WSC 001 , or permission of instructor.  May not be taken on a Pass/D+/D/Fail basis.



  
  • WSC 125 - (AA) Memes and Trolls

    Semester Hours: 3
    In this course, we’ll explore the historical roots and central rhetorical practices of trolling, going as far back as Socrates, whom Encyclopedia Dramatica calls “a famous IRL troll of pre-internets Greece credited with inventing the first recorded trolling technique and otherwise laying the foundation of the science of lulz.” We’ll consider just how rare a phenomenon trolling is (or isn’t) and whether some generally respected cultural figures and/or institutions are or aren’t (just kidding, they totally are) engaged in the practice. Focusing on the circulation of writing, in addition to its production, we’ll also examine what happens to texts after they appear on the internet, especially as they’re meme-ified. What happens when the boundary between reader and writer, producer and consumer blurs entirely? 



  
  • WSC 126 - Health Communication

    Semester Hours: 3
    This course is an introduction to health communication. Health communication is relevant for virtually every aspect of health and well-being, including disease prevention, health promotion, and quality of life. This course is designed to help participants learn about the relation of communication processes to health; an awareness of one’s own attitudes, values, beliefs, and assumptions about health and disease; developing health communication interventions; and how diversity influences health outcomes and health care interactions.

    Prerequisite(s)/Course Notes:
    May not be taken on a Pass/D+/D/Fail basis.  Credit is given for WSC 126 or RHET 123 , not both.



  
  • WSC 130 - Professional Business Writing

    Semester Hours: 2-3
    Fall, Spring
    Students will learn the forms and functions of specific business writing genres and receive an overview of the basic ethics of professional communication with particular attention to collaborative and hierarchical contexts. Writing assignments may include correspondence, newsletters, press releases, literature reviews, and reports. Research will be integrated into assignments across the semester

    Prerequisite(s)/Course Notes:
    Prerequisite or corequisite: WSC 001  or permission of instructor. Not for liberal arts credit. May not be taken on a Pass/D+/D/Fail basis.



  
  • WSC 131 - (IS) Activist Writing, Community Engagement

    Semester Hours: 3
    Periodically
    This course provides students with writing strategies to advocate for social change within both their campus and their broader communities. Students will design and complete projects with a substantial fieldwork component that includes engaging in a dialogue with a campus or community partner, identifying a problem that can be addressed through writing, and producing written material that attempts to address the problem. Students will read about, write within, and reflect upon professional writing advocacy genres, including social and news media, letters and pamphlets, professional reports, and grant applications. 

    Prerequisite(s)/Course Notes:
    WSC 001  or permission of the instructor. May not be taken on a Pass/D+/D/Fail basis.



  
  • WSC 132 - (AA) Communicating Science in Popular Culture

    Semester Hours: 3
    Periodically
    Scientific information is generally written and presented to peer audiences before being adapted for the general public. The representation of scientific information is therefore of interest to many different audiences. This course will allow students to examine and critically assess the means by which scientific information is adapted and communicated for various audiences. Students will expand their understanding of the forms and functions of science communication in structured, peer reviewed formats and assess how that material is adapted into other genres.  Writing assignments will include at least one structured scientific document (abstract, poster, slide kit and/or paper) and at least one adaptation of peer-reviewed scientific material to another format (such as creative nonfiction, blog, or video).

    Prerequisite(s)/Course Notes:
    WSC 001  or permission of the instructor.  May not be taken on a Pass/D+/D/Fail basis.



  
  • WSC 133 - Examining Scientific Writing

    Semester Hours: 3
    This course orients students to the ways that scientific writing is related to writing in different disciplines and settings. The structured scientific format used in some social sciences, STEM disciplines, and health and medicine will be reviewed and compared with other types of writing, such as the academic essay. Students will write and think about the different writing cultures and citation practices in the sciences, social sciences, and humanities. An independent research project will be assigned.

    Prerequisite(s)/Course Notes:
    WSC 001



  
  • WSC 134 - Technical Writing

    Semester Hours: 3


    Students are introduced to different types of workplace documents and are given opportunities to practice writing them.  Students learn useful methods for creating effective workplace documents and apply these strategies in the writing of a variety of documents from one-page letters to multi-page reports that include both clear writing and evidence of quantitative reasoning through data visualization.  Students learn to assess readers’ needs and develop written communication with coherent structure, clear style, and compelling page layout.

     

     



    Prerequisite(s)/Course Notes:
    WSC 001  



  
  • WSC 135 - Communities and Literacies

    Semester Hours: 3
    This course examines the connections between community and language by analyzing how various groups use written and spoken language to suit different purposes and to identify their members. Students will have the opportunity to closely analyze language use in a particular community of their choosing. Engaging with scholarship in writing studies, rhetoric, and allied disciplines, students will develop a more complex understanding of how writing helps to build communities as well as the consequences of inclusion and exclusion based on specific types of literacy.



  
  • WSC 155 A-Z - Independent Readings in Writing Studies and Composition

    Semester Hours: 1-4
    Periodically
    Independent studies in academic and professional writing and rhetoric across the disciplines. Students will read selections assigned by the instructor and prepare written work.

    Prerequisite(s)/Course Notes:
    WSC 001  and permission of instructor. Any course may be taken a number of times so long as there is a different letter designation each time it is taken. Specific titles and course descriptions for special topics courses are available in the online class schedule.



  
  • WSC 156 A-Z - Independent Readings in Writing Studies and Composition

    Semester Hours: 1-4
    Periodically
    Independent studies in academic and professional writing and rhetoric across the disciplines. Students will read selections assigned by the instructor and prepare written work.

    Prerequisite(s)/Course Notes:
    WSC 001  and permission of instructor. Any course may be taken a number of times so long as there is a different letter designation each time it is taken. Specific titles and course descriptions for special topics courses are available in the online class schedule.



  
  • WSC 180 A-Z - Special Topics in Writing Studies and Composition

    Semester Hours: 1-3


    Periodically
    Studies in academic and professional writing and rhetoric across the disciplines. These courses deal with specific issues, themes, and/or rhetorical styles and conventions.

     

    Prerequisite(s)/Course Notes:
    WSC 001 . As individual subjects are selected, each is assigned a letter (A-Z) and added to the course number. Any course may be taken a number of times so long as there is a different letter designation each time it is taken. Specific titles and course descriptions for special topics courses are available in the online class schedule.



  
  • WSC 181 A-Z - Special Topics in Writing Studies and Composition

    Semester Hours: 1-3
    Periodically
    Studies in academic and professional writing and rhetoric across the disciplines. These courses deal with specific issues, themes, and/or rhetorical styles and conventions.

    Prerequisite(s)/Course Notes:
    WSC 001 . As individual subjects are selected, each is assigned a letter (A-Z) and added to the course number. Any course may be taken a number of times so long as there is a different letter designation each time it is taken. Specific titles and course descriptions for special topics courses are available in the online class schedule.



  
  • WSC 199 - Internship in Writing Studies and Composition

    Semester Hours: 1-6
    Periodically
    This course is designed for writing studies minors . It gives students an opportunity to apply academic knowledge and skills gained in the classroom in practical work situations.

    Prerequisite(s)/Course Notes:
    WSC 001 , minimum GPA of 3.0, and prior approval by the department chairperson. A preliminary interview will be held with the student and the department chairperson or the faculty internship director to establish the nature of the academic work associated with the on-site work of the internship. There will be a minimum of 3 meetings between the student and the supervising faculty member. A minimum of 28 hours of on-site work per semester hour is required, accompanied by a minimum of 10 hours of academic work per semester hour – for example, weekly reading/writing assignments and a final essay. Final grade will be based on both academic and on-site performance. An on-site evaluation of “poor” will result in a final grade no higher than C. May be repeated for credit up to 6 semester hours. May not be taken on a Pass/D+/D/Fail basis.



 

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