Apr 21, 2024  
2022-2023 Undergraduate Bulletin 
    
2022-2023 Undergraduate Bulletin [ARCHIVED BULLETIN]

Course Descriptions


 

Computer Science (CSC)

  
  
  
  • CSC 199 - Computer Science and Computer Engineering Internship

    Semester Hours: 1-3
    Fall, Spring
    Internship course for qualified junior/senior computer science majors. Students work approximately 10 hours per week in the computing profession at participating research laboratories, industry corporations or startup companies and are jointly supervised by the department and the employer. An internship proposal must be approved by the internship coordinator prior to registration for the course. At the end of the semester, internship students present at a common meeting to which all faculty and students are invited.

    Prerequisite(s)/Course Notes:
    Admission by permission of the internship coordinator dependent on student’s record and availability of placement. Course may be repeated for up to 3 s.h. (Formerly 195 A-Z, Computer Science and Computer Engineering Internship I; 195, Independent Study Computer science and Computer Engineering Internship I; Independent Study Computer Science I.)



  
  • CSC 199E - Internship in Leadership and Innovation in Computing

    Semester Hours: 3
    Fall, Spring
    Internship course for qualified students enrolled in the Option or Concentration in Leadership and Innovation in Computing programs. Students work approximately 10 hours per week on entrepreneurial tasks under the mentorship of an entrepreneur. They are jointly supervised by the department and the entrepreneur. An internship proposal must be approved by the director of the Leadership and Innovation in Computing programs prior to registration for the course. At the end of the semester, internship students present at a common meeting to which all faculty and students are invited.

    Prerequisite(s)/Course Notes:
    CSC 194  or ENTR 115 . Open only to students enrolled in the Leadership and Innovation in Computing (OLIC and CLIC) programs. Admission by permission of the director of the Leadership and Innovation in Computing programs. Course may not be repeated for credit. (Formerly 196A-Z Computer Science and Computer Engineering Internship II; 196, Independent Study Computer science and Computer Engineering Internship II.)




Cooperative Education Program (COOP)

  
  • COOP 199 - Cooperative Education Program

    Semester Hours: No credit
    Fall, January, Spring, Summer
    A full-time compensated work experience in which students develop professional skills relevant to their majors outside the academic environment in an industry or other organization. It is normally undertaken during the junior year, and encompasses a spring and summer, or a summer and fall, period of employment, and hence will extend by one semester the duration of the degree program. Students who successfully complete the experience obtain “CR” on their transcripts.




Counseling and Mental Health Professions (CMHP)

  
  • CMHP 100 - Introduction to Human Services

    Semester Hours: 3
    Fall, Spring
    This course is an overview of the characteristics, skills and knowledge that make up an effective human services counselor. Students will gain exposure to the human services field through both on-campus activities and community-based agency experiences, such as lectures, on-site visits, guest speakers, interaction with media-based learning, and classroom and small-group discussions.



  
  • CMHP 101 - Case Management in the Human Services Profession

    Semester Hours: 3
    Fall, Spring
    This course serves as an introduction to the concept of case management within the human services profession. The case management process is traced from the intake interview to termination of services. In-depth attention is directed toward the three phases of case management: assessment, planning, and implementation, including the tools, techniques, and skills necessary for all three phases. An exploration of the roles and responsibilities necessary to function as an effective case manager are reviewed. In addition, the context in which the case management process occurs is discussed along with the organizational, legal, and ethical issues confronting the case manager. Historical perspectives and theoretical models of case management are examined in detail as well as the methods for effective documentation and case recording.

    Prerequisite(s)/Course Notes:
    Prerequisite or Corequisite: CMHP 100 .



  
  • CMHP 102 - Application of Counseling Skills and Ethics in the Human Services Profession

    Semester Hours: 3
    Fall, Spring
    In this course, students will be introduced to the helping relationship, legal and ethical issues, counseling theory, and basic helping skills. Additional emphasis will be placed on helper characteristics, relationship-building, multicultural and diversity issues in counseling, self-awareness and self-care.  Ethical standards will be reviewed as set forth by the National Organization for Human Services (NOHS). The legal issues impacting the human services professional with today’s complex society demands, and an in-depth examination of ethical codes as they relate to contemporary human services issues, will be included in the course.

    Prerequisite(s)/Course Notes:
    Prerequisite or Corequisite: CMHP 100 .



  
  • CMHP 103 - Medical, Functional and Psychosocial Aspects of Disability

    Semester Hours: 3
    Fall, Spring

    This course provides an overview of the more common and significant chronic diseases and disabling conditions, including medical, functional, and psychosocial aspects. Emphasis is on the terminology of medical rehabilitation, professionals involved, and impact of conditions on overall quality of life. Attention is given to the basic terminology and language required to communicate effectively with medical personnel and to comprehend medical reports.

    Prerequisite(s)/Course Notes:
    Prerequisite or Corequisite: CMHP 100 . May not be taken on a Pass/D+/D/Fail basis.



  
  
  
  • CMHP 180 to 189 A-Z - Special Topics

    Semester Hours: 1-4
    Periodically
    Specific courses designed to explore emerging topics in counseling.

    Prerequisite(s)/Course Notes:
    As individual subjects are selected, each is assigned a letter (A-Z) and added to the course number. Specific titles and course descriptions for special topics courses are available in the online class schedule. Any course may be taken a number of times so long as there is a different letter designation each time it is taken. (Formerly Workshops.)




Creative Arts Therapy (CAT)

  

Creative Writing (CRWR)

  
  • CRWR 008 A-Z - Explorations

    Semester Hours: 1


    Periodically

    Introductions to specific topics in creative writing such as narration, characterization, poetic form, and the creative process.

    Prerequisite(s)/Course Notes:
    WSC 001  or WSC 002 . As individual subjects are selected, each is assigned a letter (A-Z) which is affixed to the course number. Specific titles and course descriptions for special topics courses are available in the online class schedule. May be repeated for up to 3 s.h. when topic varies.



  
  • CRWR 012F - First-Year Seminar

    Semester Hours: 1-4


    Fall

    This course gives first-year students the opportunity to work in a seminar format with a member of the faculty in an area of the faculty member’s research interests. 

    Prerequisite(s)/Course Notes:
    The course is open to first-year students only. Topics vary by semester. Consult the class schedule for proper category listing. Students may take only one 012F or 012S seminar.



  
  
  • CRWR 014F - First-Year Seminar

    Semester Hours: 3-4


    Fall

    This course gives first-year students the opportunity to work in a seminar format with a member of the faculty in an area of the faculty member’s research interests. 

    Prerequisite(s)/Course Notes:
    The course is open to first-year students only. Topics vary by semester. This course is offered for distribution credit; consult the Semester Planning Guide for proper category listing. Students may take only one 014F or 012F seminar and only one 014S or 012S seminar.



  
  • CRWR 014S - First-Year Seminar

    Semester Hours: 3-4


    Spring 

    This course gives first-year students the opportunity to work in a seminar format with a member of the faculty in an area of the faculty member’s research interests. 

    Prerequisite(s)/Course Notes:
    The course is open to first-year students only. Topics vary by semester. This course is offered for distribution credit; consult the Semester Planning Guide for proper category listing. Students may take only one 014F or 012F seminar and only one 014S or 012S seminar.



  
  • CRWR 050 - (CP) Fantastic Fiction

    Semester Hours: 3 s.h.


    Periodically

    This course develops students’ abilities to write speculative fiction and investigates how such writing explores human experiences through adventures in alternative realities.  Readings may include fantastical literature by Homer, William Shakespeare, the Brothers Grimm, Phillip K. Dick, Ursula Le Guin, Margaret Atwood, Stephen King, Jennifer Egan, Karen Russell, and Neil Gaiman.  Students will practice techniques that enable them to make stories that move through and beyond recognizable realities both convincing and compelling

    Prerequisite(s)/Course Notes:
    WSC 001  or WSC 002  .Credit given for this course or CRWR 191M, not both. (Formerly CRWR 191M, Advanced Topic: Writing Genre Fiction.)



  
  
  
  
  • CRWR 135 - Fiction Writing

    Semester Hours: 3-4
    Fall and Spring

    A course to help the developing writer of short stories and novels sharpen the powers of expression. Students’ work will be read and analyzed. Discussions will deal with matters particular to the manuscript as well as with general problems of craft. Oral presentations required.

    Prerequisite(s)/Course Notes:
    CRWR 133  or submission of manuscript. (Formerly Workshop: Prose Writing.)



  
  • CRWR 136 - Creative Nonfiction Writing

    Semester Hours: 3
    Once a year

    Discussion of techniques used in a wide range of nonfiction writing, including journalistic columns, essays, interviews, magazine articles, drama, and book reviews. This course is designed to help developing creative writers sharpen their powers of expression through reading and discussion of student’s work and analysis of themes and techniques.

    Prerequisite(s)/Course Notes:
    CRWR 133  or permission of the Director of the Conference. (Formerly Workshop: Writing in Varieties of Nonfiction.)



  
  • CRWR 137 - (CP) Introductory Playwriting

    Semester Hours: 3-4
    Fall, Spring
    Designed to introduce the student to the fundamental elements of play construction. Particular emphasis will be placed on such components as plot, character, dialogue and action. While this is primarily a writing course, each student will be asked to complete certain reading assignments during the semester. There will be no exams or term papers; instead, brief (script) writing assignments combine with a final project of a one-act play. Classes are conducted according to a workshop format, allowing for discussions of general topics and specific challenges.

    Prerequisite(s)/Course Notes:
    WSC 001 ; CRWR 133 , or DRAM 009, or permission of instructor. May not be taken on a Pass/D+/D/Fail basis. (Formerly Introductory Playwriting Workshop.)



  
  • CRWR 138 - (CP) Creative Online

    Semester Hours: 3
    Periodically

    A creative writing course in which students study the texts and techniques of poets and prose writers who create their work digitally, utilizing such tools as hypertext linking and mixing software to generate creative works that could not exist on paper or in print. Students will write their own creative “analog” work, then use basic digital tools to create digital literature.

    Prerequisite(s)/Course Notes:
    WSC 001 .



  
  • CRWR 184 A-Z - (CP) Special Topics

    Semester Hours: 1-3


    Fall, Spring

    Special topics related to the creative writing genres. Subjects to be selected yearly.


    Current Special Topics

    CRWR 184F: DL  (CP) Keeping A Journal                                            

    Using Lynda Barry’s book Syllabus as an inspiration this class will be an exploration of the artistic benefits of keeping a journal.  Students will be required to keep a daily journal, using exercises as prompts for noticing the world, for becoming aware of how to be present with our own selves and our inner lives while also coming to understand the importance of observation and seeing what’s there right in front of us. Prompts will come in many forms and generally engage questions that writers are constantly asking either indirectly or directly: What makes good art? Where does imagination come from?  How do we steal from books we love? Can creativity be contagious? Why do details matter?  How does writer’s block get broken? What is bad writing?  Why does art exist?  In addition to Lynda Barry, we will also look at journal excerpts from Anais Nin, Sylvia Plath, Virginia Woolf, Ann Frank, Susan Sontag, Vladimir Nabokov, and others. 

    Not for credit in addition to CRWR 185D Keeping a Journal

    Prerequisite(s)/Course Notes:
    WSC 001 . May be repeated for credit when topics vary. As individual subjects are selected, each is assigned a letter (A-Z) which is affixed to the course number. Specific titles and course descriptions for special topics courses are available in the online class schedule.



  
  • CRWR 185 A-Z - Special Topics

    Semester Hours: 3


    Fall, Spring
    Special topics related to the creative writing genres. Subjects to be selected yearly.

    Current Special Topics

    CRWR 185E: Fiction: Character and Conflict                                

    Characters need or desire something. They proactively try to get it.  Obstacles, both external and internal, get in the way, causing conflicts.  How characters deal with these conflicts essentially defines who they are and gives shape to the story.  You can’t have a strong story without strong characters, and you can’t have strong characters without strong conflict.  

    In this advanced fiction writing workshop, students will concentrate particularly on the idea that character drives action, and that action grows out of conflict, conflict being defined as a character’s needs or desires meeting external or internal opposition. 

    Students will be required to complete three short stories over the course of the semester.  Students will workshop their first drafts with the class, receive verbal and written notes from their peers and from the instructor, and then submit revised copies of their stories based on those notes. Only the revised drafts will be graded.

    Students will also be asked to read a number of published stories and excerpts, analyzing the work with an eye to how the authors set their characters up against obstacles, and how the characters’ journeys move forward primarily through the process of engaging the conflicts created by those obstacles.

    Prerequisite: CRWR 133 and CRWR 135 or instructor’s permission.

    Prerequisite(s)/Course Notes:
    WSC 001  and CRWR 133 . May be repeated for credit when topics vary. As individual subjects are selected, each is assigned a letter (A-Z) which is affixed to the course number. Specific titles and course descriptions for special topics courses are available in the online class schedule.



  
  
  
  
  • CRWR 189 - Writing Children’s Literature

    Semester Hours: 3 s.h.


    Periodically

    This writing course centers on creating story for the beginning and young reader, from preschool up to middle school.  Readings, discussions, and writing assignments explore how a child can be drawn to the written word through the ear and the eye.  Readings may include Goodnight Moon, The Little Prince, The Sneetches, Where the Wild Things Are, and The Beach at Night.

    Prerequisite(s)/Course Notes:
    WSC 001 ; CRWR 133 , or ENGL 152 , or ENGL 155 , or ENGL 175 , or SED 164 , or permission of the instructor. Credit given for this course or CRWR 184X, not both. (Formerly CRWR184X, Writing for Children.)

     

     

     

     

     



  
  • CRWR 190 A-Z - Advanced Topics in Creative Writing

    Semester Hours: 3


    Fall, Spring

    Special topics related to the creative writing genres. Subjects to be selected yearly.

    Current Special Topics

    CRWR 190D  Imitation and Discovery        

    In this poetry workshop, we focus on the process of discovering one’s own lyric voice through imitating the patterns we hear, see, and intuit in the work of other poets. Class time will be devoted in part to the reading and critique of poems you compose each week in response to work by contemporary poets who serve as powerful models for imitation and discovery. Over the course of the semester, we will discuss a wide range of poets engaging us in dialogue with essential elements of the craft. Students will be encouraged to explore strategies that spur the development of an individual style: to experiment with syntax, diction, tone, and rhetorical structure; to project different personae; and to play with possibilities of the line as a measure of breath, rhythm, and thought.

    Prerequisite: CRWR 134 or permission from the instructor.



    Prerequisite(s)/Course Notes:
    WSC 001  and CRWR 133 . May be repeated for credit when topics vary. As individual subjects are selected, each is assigned a letter (A-Z) which is affixed to the course number. Specific titles and course descriptions for special topics courses are available in the online class schedule.



  
  • CRWR 191 A-Z - Advanced Topics in Creative Writing

    Semester Hours: 3


    Fall, Spring
    Special topics related to the creative writing genres. Subjects are to be selected yearly.

    Current Special Topics

    CRWR 191M, Fiction: Reading Like a Writer
    Writers have always learned the craft by studying the works of masters.  In this class, a craft class, we will do just that, learn from masters by reading literature through the lens of the writer—how to steal, borrow, adapt, grow, and above all how to take apart a story to learn from how it was made.  We will be looking at great literary models (Anton Chekhov, Alice Munro, William Trevor, Jhumpa Lahiri, Toni Morrison, Grace Paley, Tommy Orange, and others) to study and dissect how they achieve mastery of character, sentence structure, of point of view, of telling detail, of the plot.  We will read one story per week, reading them line by line, paragraph by paragraph to understand how different techniques of craft are employed while also exploring the most enduring literary voices of our time.   


    Prerequisite(s)/Course Notes:
    WSC 001  and CRWR 133 . May be repeated for credit when topics vary. As individual subjects are selected, each is assigned a letter (A-Z) which is affixed to the course number. Specific titles and course descriptions for special topics courses are available in the online class schedule.



  
  
  • CRWR 199 - Departmental Honors Candidacy: Project

    Semester Hours: 3
    Fall
    Consists of a substantial project in the field of creative writing. 

    Prerequisite(s)/Course Notes:
    Open only to senior English and creative writing majors who are eligible for departmental honors and who secure, before registration, the written permission of the instructor who will supervise the project. Open only to students who have fulfilled the Writing Proficiency Exam requirement. (Formerly ENGL 199; Honors Essay.)




Criminology (CRM)

  
  • CRM 001 - (IS) Introduction to Criminology

    Semester Hours: 3
    This course is an introduction to the general framework of the discipline of Criminology and selected topics within it such as mass incarceration, community policing, death penalty and neurolaw, among others. You will become conversant with several prominent perspectives on the definitions of crime and justice, crime causation and operation of criminal law and criminal justice system.

    Prerequisite(s)/Course Notes:
    Credit is given for this course or SOC 007 , not both.



  
  • CRM 002 - (IS) Theoretical Perspectives on Crime and Justice

    Semester Hours: 3
    Fall, Spring
    This course delves in depth into the theories of crime, deviance, and social control found in the disciplines of sociology, history, psychology, philosophy, political science, and law. Students will learn to evaluate critically the contributions of the various disciplines and to compare and contrast theoretical perspectives while applying them to policies and debates within the discipline of criminology.

    Prerequisite(s)/Course Notes:
    CRM 001  or SOC 007 . May not be taken on a Pass/D+/D/Fail basis.



  
  • CRM 003 - (IS) Domestic Violence

    Semester Hours: 3
    Once a Year
    Examining theories and empirical research, this course explores legal, political, social and medical perspectives on the etiology of domestic violence and abuse in the United States. It highlights the role of the criminal justice system and other institutions in both alleviating and perpetuating violence against women. In addition, it emphasizes individual and collective strategies to end domestic violence, especially the role of community-based organizations. Although the primary focus of the course is the United States, the complexity of domestic violence in a global context is also outlined.

    Prerequisite(s)/Course Notes:
    May not be taken on a Pass/D+/D/Fail basis.



  
  • CRM 004 - (IS) Mental Illness and Criminal Behavior

    Semester Hours: 3
    Fall, Spring
    This course will focus on high-profile cases where mental illness and criminal activity intersect.  We will consider topics such as the legal standard of insanity and its relationship to the psychiatric definition of a particular mental illness; the standard for competence to stand trial; specialty courts (i.e., mental health and drug treatment courts); possible alternatives to incarceration; and legal issues associated with psychologically disturbed juvenile delinquents and with sex offenders.

    Prerequisite(s)/Course Notes:
    May not be taken on a Pass/D+/D/Fail basis. Credit given for this course or CRM 187A, not both. (Formerly CRM 187A, Special Topics in Criminology: Mental Illness and Criminal Behavior.)



  
  • CRM 005 - (IS) Gender, Crime and Criminal Justice

    Semester Hours: 3 s.h.


    Fall, Spring

    Along with race and class, gender contributes to profound differences between men and women in the amounts and types of crimes that they commit and the kinds of justice they receive. This course debunks entrenched assumptions that put biology front and center when explaining female criminality. It will examine etiological (causal) factors that lead men and women to different pathways of criminality, as well as gendered assumptions that stand behind the social construction of and response to different types of criminality. The course will take up such questions as, why do the types and patterns of criminal behavior differ dramatically by gender, why are there gender-specific types of victimization, how does gender of the victim affect social and legal responses to victimization, and how does gender of the offender influence their treatment in the various institutions of criminal justice (policing, court, prisons). 

    Prerequisite(s)/Course Notes:
    Credit given for this course or CRM 187L, not both.  May not be taken on a Pass/D+/D/Fail basis.  (Formerly CRM 187-L, Gender Crime and Criminal Justice)



  
  • CRM 006 - (IS) Ethics in Policing

    Semester Hours: 3
    Ethical dilemmas confronting criminal justice academics, practictioners, and policy makers are far reaching and prevalent in the United States’ criminal justice system. This course develops the ethical decision-making skills that are essential in the field of criminal justice across all three elements of the criminal justice system: the police, the courts, and corrections. Here we borrow from the philosophical principles and theories that are the foundation of ethical decision-making in collaboration with the latest challenges and issues in criminal justice. These topics include the ”militarization” of the police, mass imprisonment, wrongful convictions, the ”misuse” of power by public servants, to name a few of the salient topics that this course will cover. If your career path intentions are in the field of policing, courts, or corrections, or hold an interest in the field of criminal justice this course delivers the information and tools you need to comprehend and deal effectively with these ethical challenges.This course allows students with the unique opportunity to analyze how they would resolve ethical challenges in the criminal justice system according to their own values and beliefs while staying within the confines of the law and professional codes of ethics.



  
  • CRM 007 - (IS) Delinquency and Juvenile Justice

    Semester Hours: 3
    This course is intended to examine in depth the nature, causes, and control of juvenile delinquency. This course will also examine in depth the theoretical explanations for delinquency and how a child’s relationship with key social institutions influences their behavior. Most importantly the course will provide an orientation to the issues, policies and procedures which makeup our system of justice for children. The function and legal responsibilities of the Police, Probation, Juvenile Court and corrections system will be studied. Emphasis will be on societal forces that bring children into the Justice System including child abuse, and gang participation. Current programs and policies directed at the prevention, treatment, and control of delinquency will be examined. 



  
  • CRM 008 - (IS) White Collar Crime

    Semester Hours: 3
    Using real case studies and a critical lens, this course explores the definitions, theorized causes, impact, and documented effects of white-collar crime. What is it about this subject that justifies a distinct focus from the study of other crimes? What does the fact that white-collar crime is its own subject within the broader context of criminology says about our society? Who commits white-collar crimes? Are they fairly punished? These are just some of the topics we will cover throughout our time together. This course will utilize different course materials, including podcasts, TED talks, textbook readings, and oral arguments, to answer these important questions. The goal is to study white-collar crime in an interactive, thought-provoking way by examining its practical impact on our world and challenging our own views and biases about the subject matter.



  
  • CRM 009 - (BH) Surveillance

    Semester Hours: 3

    This course is intended to examine the in-depth nature, causes of origin, and means of control of surveillance. Surveillance has become a central means of social ordering and national and international governance. In this class, we broach the following questions: What is surveillance?  How is surveillance used by agents of government including those in law enforcement?  Where should we trace cultural and historical roots of surveillance which underlies the foundation of the modern nation-state? What form does surveillance take in varying contexts and situations? How does the emerging “imperative” and “necessity” of security shape the use of surveillance in light of post-9/11 events? How is the practice of surveillance related to scientific and technological developments? How is it changing our social life, and our notions of private and public space? How can social/criminological theory inform our understanding of these developments? Students considering a career in the justice system will understand the role of surveillance among agents of law enforcement and reactions within the judicial system.



  
  • CRM 010 - (IS) Are Prisons Obsolete?

    Semester Hours: 3

    This course centers around the iconic text and ultimate question: are prisons obsolete? The class will focus on the history, growth, and current functioning of the American system of incarceration with the critical goal of questioning the future of such carceral structures. The course begins with the book Are Prisons Obsolete? by Angela Davis and foundational sociological examinations, but the texts for the course intersect with several fields, including Gender Studies, Geography, History, and Disability Studies. Students will be exposed to arguments against retributive sanctioning and explore alternative justice systems.



  
  • CRM 011 - (IS) Restorative Justice

    Semester Hours: 3

    Interdisciplinary exploration of specific issues in the discipline of criminology—e.g. organized crime, forgery, juvenile court, crimes against children, etc. Topics may change each semester.  This course focuses on the fundamental principles and practices of restorative justice. It explores the needs and roles of key stakeholders (victims, offenders, communities, justice systems), outlines the basic principles and values of restorative justice, and introduces some of the primary models of practice. It also identifies challenges to restorative justice. 



  
  
  
  • CRM 013 - (BH) Health and Incarceration

    Semester Hours: 3

    This course examines the nexus between public health and incarceration. Specifically, the course aims to examine the potential of the far-reaching implications of incarceration on public health, and that of specific health concerns on correctional practices and policies. As such the course is aimed to expose students to the myriad challenges faced by correctional institutions in their daily operations to provide public safety and justice. The course will discuss the nexus between public health and justice, and its far-reaching social implications in a sociological and penological aspect. In addition, certain public health issues that characterize the correctional population will be examined in a broader context to enable a more wholesome examination of the far-reaching consequences of incarceration on public health in the community. Accordingly, the course will deal with basic theories and concepts related to the sociology of health, public health, incarceration, as well as legal cases that had an effect on correctional practices and policies.



  
  • CRM 014F - First-Year Seminar

    Semester Hours: 3-4
    Fall
    This course gives first-year students the opportunity to work in a seminar format with a member of the faculty in an area of the faculty member’s research interests.

    Prerequisite(s)/Course Notes:
    The course is open to first-year students only. Topics vary by semester. This course is offered for distribution credit; consult the Semester Planning Guide for proper category listing. Students may take only one 014F or 012F seminar and only one 014S or 012S seminar.



  
  • CRM 014S - First-Year Seminar

    Semester Hours: 3-4
    Spring
    This course gives first-year students the opportunity to work in a seminar format with a member of the faculty in an area of the faculty member’s research interests.

    Prerequisite(s)/Course Notes:
    The course is open to first-year students only. Topics vary by semester. This course is offered for distribution credit; consult the Semester Planning Guide for proper category listing. Students may take only one 014F or 012F seminar and only one 014S or 012S seminar.



  
  • CRM 015 - (BH) Immigration and the Law

    Semester Hours: 3

    This course will provide students with the analytical tools to understand the dynamics driving the politics of the current wave of immigrants from the Caribbean, Latin America, Asia, and Africa and how it affects American society and culture. It will also focus on current and past legislation about immigration to the United States. Can a state control migration, including “unwanted” migrants? How do we understand the politics of immigration in the context of the criminalization of immigrants? In an era of uncertainty, how can we pursue policies that will ensure the security of our borders without closing off flows which are often considered necessary for our economic security?

    Prerequisite(s)/Course Notes:
    Credit is given for CRM 015 or SOC 139, not both.



  
  
  • CRM 187 A-Z - (IS) Special Topics in Criminology

    Semester Hours: 3


    Fall, Spring

    Interdisciplinary exploration of specific issues in the discipline of criminology — e.g., organized crime, forgery, juvenile courts, crimes against children, etc. Topics may change each semester.

    Current Special Topics

    CRM 187E - (IS) Gender & the Policed State

    This class will explore how the epidemic of Mass Incarceration uniquely impacts Womxyn and the need for centering these marginalized narratives in our examination of the problem. Additionally, this course will explore and interrogate abolition as a radical Feminist project. Historically, Criminal Justice research and rhetoric has focused on the experiences of men, assuming that whatever interventions and policies are deemed beneficial to men will extend to womxn counterparts – data and research confirm that this has been a huge mistake. Yet, while Womxn today are the fastest-growing correctional population in the United States there is surprisingly little research on the causes of this trend. Exploring the impact of mass incarceration on Womxn through feminist frameworks and theories will lead the course to critique gender as a policed state and imagine alternatives to a patriarchal carceral system.  

    CRM 187I - (IS) Immigration and the Law

    This course will provide students with the analytical tools to understand the dynamics driving the politics of the current wave of immigrants from the Caribbean, Latin America, Asia, and Africa, and the way it affects American society and culture. It will also focus on current and past legislation about immigration to the United States. Can the state control migration, including “unwanted” migrants? How do we understand the politics of immigration in the context of the criminalization of immigrants? In an era of uncertainty, how can we pursue policies that will ensure the security of our borders without closing off flows which are often considered necessary for our economic security? We begin with an examination of immigration law and policies in the United States that let some people in while keeping others out. 

    CRM 187S - (IS) Mass incarceration & LGBTQ+ Communities 

    Scholars have written extensively about the correlation between race, policing, and incarceration. Thought leaders in prison studies, such as Angela Davis, Ruth Wilson Gilmore, and Michelle Alexander, have used the abolitionist framework to argue that in the modern era, populations formerly controlled through slavery and colonization—namely, poor black and indigenous peoples—are now controlled through the prison system. Only in the past decade have academics begun to seriously take up the question of how gender identity, particularly for trans and gender-nonconforming people, and queer identity relate to the history and current landscape of Mass Incarceration and the Carceral State. This course aims to explore and analyze that question/issue.   

    Prerequisite(s)/Course Notes:
    May be repeated for credit when topics vary. As individual subjects are offered, each is assigned a letter (A-Z) which is affixed to the course number. Students may take up to two (6 s.h.) of these courses in fulfillment of the electives requirement for their Criminology major or minor, so long as each special topics course has a different letter designation. Specific titles and course descriptions for special topics courses are available in the online class schedule.



  
  • CRM 190 - Internship in Criminology

    Semester Hours: 1-4
    Fall, Spring, Summer
    This internship program provides students with practical knowledge and skills required in the fields of applied criminology and law.

    Prerequisite(s)/Course Notes:
    CRM 001  or SOC 007 ; 3.0 GPA; interview with program director. For each semester hour of credit earned, students will work a minimum of 28 hours on site in addition to completing a minimum of 10 hours of academic work that will include reading, research, and a final paper or project that situates the internship experience within the broader framework of the academic study of criminology. Also required are a minimum of three meetings with a faculty adviser. Only 3 s.h. for CRM 190 may be counted toward the criminology major  or minor .



  
  • CRM 191 - (IS) Advanced Research Seminar in Criminology

    Semester Hours: 3


    Fall, Spring

    An advanced research seminar that presents a topic that reflects a broad understanding of the ideas of the discipline of Criminology as well as modes of analyses with current significance to the discipline. Through joint readings and discussions and an individual research project, the students will develop ideas relevant to the theme of the course. Students are expected to share their work with the class in both written and oral forms. Topics vary from semester to semester. 

    Prerequisite(s)/Course Notes:
    CRM 001  or SOC 007 , CRM 002 , SOC 180  or PSY 040 , SOC 181 . May be repeated for a maximum of 6 semester hours as elective credit and when topics vary.




Curriculum and Teaching (CT)

  
  • CT 102 - Development and Learning in Childhood and Adolescence

    Semester Hours: 3
    Fall, Spring
    Theory and research on physical, cognitive, affective, and social development in childhood and adolescence, with implications for learning, teaching and health in elementary, middle, and secondary schools. Issues pertaining to literacy, technology, and multicultural education are considered. Required 20 hours of classroom participation-observation in high-needs schools.

    Prerequisite(s)/Course Notes:
    May not be taken on a Pass/D+/D/Fail basis. Credit given for this course or SED 102 , not both.



  
  • CT 118 - Introduction to Dance Education

    Semester Hours: 1
    Fall
    This course introduces the student to the historical and philosophical inclusion of dance in public education, and to major developments in dance education, including the New York State Standards for the Arts, the National Standards for Dance Education, the Opportunity-to-Learn Standards for Dance and the New York City Blueprint for Teaching and Learning in Dance. Students will study the evolving role of dance in theories of learning and development, and the role of dance in elementary and secondary schools, and will learn to use this knowledge for dance advocacy.

    Prerequisite(s)/Course Notes:
    May not be taken on a Pass/D+/D/Fail basis.



  
  • CT 119 - Teaching Dance at the Elementary Level

    Semester Hours: 3
    Spring

    This course prepares students to develop and implement a complete program in dance for the PreK-6 child. Students will study varied models for dance in the schools, and learn strategies to teach dance as a creative art form and as an integrated part of the elementary curriculum. Subjects include: the physical and perceptual development of children in relationship to teaching dance; practice in teaching strategies; lesson, class, unit and curriculum design with consideration of New York City, New York State and national standards for dance; modes of assessment; teaching varied populations; and the creative use of technology in the classroom. Class observations (20 hours) and lesson demonstrations are required.

    Prerequisite(s)/Course Notes:
    May not be taken on a Pass/D+/D/Fail basis.



  
  • CT 120 - Teaching Dance at the Secondary Level

    Semester Hours: 3


    Fall

    This course prepares students to develop and implement a complete program in dance for the 7-12 youth. Students will study varied models for dance in the middle and high schools, and learn strategies to teach dance as an artistic discipline, a creative art form, a means of self-expression and a study of cultural diversity. Subjects include: the physical and emotional development of youth in relationship to teaching dance; practice in teaching strategies; lesson, class, unit and curriculum design with consideration of New York City, New York State and national standards of dance; modes of assessment; teaching varied populations; and the creative use of technology in the classroom. Class observations (20 hours) and lesson demonstrations are required.

    Prerequisite(s)/Course Notes:
    May not be taken on a Pass/D+/D/Fail basis.

     



  
  • CT 133 - Teaching Art History

    Semester Hours: 3
    Fall, Spring
    This seminar course, designed for pre-service art education students, examines varied approaches to teaching art history to students on the elementary and secondary school levels. Students will focus on global art historical perspectives, the relationship of art forms to cultural context and media and methods employed, both past and present. Current technologies applied in art will be examined.

    Prerequisite(s)/Course Notes:
    AH 003 , 004 . Same as SED 139 . May not be taken on a Pass/D+ID/Fail basis.



  
  • CT 165 - Methods and Materials in Teaching the Bilingual Learner

    Semester Hours: 3
    Once a year
    Designed to prepare students to teach K-12 children in a mixed cultural group. Motivation and degree of acculturalization are analyzed. Suitable materials and teaching strategies are included. Field placements in bilingual settings appropriate to major levels of interest are required.

    Prerequisite(s)/Course Notes:
    Students must be registered in an elementary or secondary provisional certification sequence.



  
  • CT 179 - Student Teaching (Undergraduate)

    Semester Hours: 6
    Fall, Spring
    Full-time student teaching in cooperating schools with direction and supervision from University sponsors. For teachers in art, music and dance education only. Students have two placements during the semester: one at the elementary school level (preK-6) and the other at the high school level (7- 12). Attendance at weekly seminars is required. Student teachers review content area planning including assessment, inclusion, diversity, literacy, resources, and technology and relate pedagogy to content. Special required seminars address issues of child abuse and abduction, substance abuse, and safety, fire and arson prevention.

    Prerequisite(s)/Course Notes:
    19 semester hours of professional education course work, the appropriate methods courses, appropriate grade point averages, and official acceptance into Student Teaching. For admission criteria, see Secondary Education, Undergraduate Programs. Art and Dance corequisite: SED 178 . Music corequisite: SED 178  or MUS 122  or pedagogy class or skills-based music class approved by adviser. All music education students must complete a professional portfolio. Pass/D+/D/Fail grade only. Admission by application and interview only. Application may be obtained at the Office of Field Placement and returned by May 1 for the succeeding spring semester and by February 15 for the succeeding fall semester.



  
  • CT 190 - Departmental Honors Candidacy

    Semester Hours: 3
    Periodically

    Research for and writing of a substantial project (i.e., essay, curriculum) in the field of education. 

    Prerequisite(s)/Course Notes:
    Open only to senior education majors who are eligible for departmental honors and who have secured, prior to registration, the permission of the faculty adviser who will supervise the essay. It may not be taken on a Pass/D/D+/Fail basis.




Dance (DNCE)

  
  • DNCE 011 - (CP) Modern Dance I

    Semester Hours: 2-4*
    Fall
    One of the technique classes in contemporary dance forms designed for the dance major-to continue over a four-year range of study. Emphasis on technical development, theories and discussion related to expressive potentialities and the mastery of stylistic variation in contemporary forms of movement.

    Prerequisite(s)/Course Notes:
    Open only to dance  and dance education  majors or by permission of instructor. Assignment of students to one of the sections is based on prior experience, study and advancement. Course includes required 90 minute modern dance lab. May be repeated once for credit. 



  
  • DNCE 011A - (CP) Modern Dance IA

    Semester Hours: 2
    Once a year
    One of the technique classes in contemporary dance forms designed for the nonmajor to continue over a two-year range of study. Emphasis on technical development, theories, and discussion related to expressive potentialities, and the mastery of stylistic variation in contemporary forms of movement. Assignment of students to one of the sections is based on prior experience, study, and advancement.

    Prerequisite(s)/Course Notes:
    Open only to nondance majors. May be repeated once for credit.



  
  • DNCE 012 - (CP) Modern Dance II

    Semester Hours: 2-4
    Spring
    One of the technique classes in contemporary dance forms designed for the dance major-to continue over a four-year range of study. Emphasis on technical development, theories and discussion related to expressive potentialities and the mastery of stylistic variation in contemporary forms of movement.

    Prerequisite(s)/Course Notes:
    Open only to dance  and dance education  majors or by permission of instructor. Assignment of students to one of the sections is based on prior experience, study and advancement. Course includes required modern dance lab and may include a Pilates lab. May be repeated once for credit. (Formerly 12M.)



  
  • DNCE 012A - (CP) Modern Dance IIA

    Semester Hours: 2
    Once a year
    One of the technique classes in contemporary dance forms designed for the nonmajor-to continue over a two-year range of study. Emphasis on technical development, theories and discussion related to expressive potentialities, and the mastery of stylistic variation in contemporary forms of movement. Assignment of students to one of the sections is based on prior experience, study and advancement.

    Prerequisite(s)/Course Notes:
    DNCE 011A  or permission of instructor. Open only to nondance majors. May be repeated once for credit.



  
  
  
  • DNCE 013 - (CP) Modern Dance III

    Semester Hours: 2-4
    Fall
    One of the technique classes in contemporary dance forms designed for the dance major-to continue over a four-year range of study. Emphasis on technical development, theories and discussion related to expressive potentialities and the mastery of stylistic variation in contemporary forms of movement.

    Prerequisite(s)/Course Notes:
    Open only to dance  and dance education  majors or by permission of instructor. Assignment of students to one of the sections is based on prior experience, study and advancement. Course includes required modern dance lab and may include a Pilates lab. May be repeated once for credit.



  
  • DNCE 013A - (CP) Modern Dance IIIA

    Semester Hours: 2
    Once a year
    One of the technique classes in contemporary dance forms designed for the nonmajor-to continue over a two-year range of study. Emphasis on technical development, theories and discussion related to expressive potentialities, and the mastery of stylistic variation in contemporary forms of movement. Assignment of students to one of the sections is based on prior experience, study and advancement.

    Prerequisite(s)/Course Notes:
    Open only to nondance majors.  May be repeated once for credit.



  
  • DNCE 014 - (CP) Modern Dance IV

    Semester Hours: 2-4
    Spring
    One of the technique classes in contemporary dance forms designed for the dance major-to continue over a four-year range of study. Emphasis on technical development, theories and discussion related to expressive potentialities and the mastery of stylistic variation in contemporary forms of movement.

    Prerequisite(s)/Course Notes:
    Open only to dance  and dance education  majors or by permission of instructor. Assignment of students to one of the sections is based on prior experience, study and advancement. Course includes required modern dance lab and may include a Pilates lab. May be repeated once for credit.



  
  • DNCE 014A - (CP) Modern Dance IVA

    Semester Hours: 2
    Once a year
    One of the technique classes in contemporary dance forms designed for the nonmajor-to continue over a two-year range of study. Emphasis on technical development, theories and discussion related to expressive potentialities, and the mastery of stylistic variation in contemporary forms of movement. Assignment of students to one of the sections is based on prior experience, study and advancement.

    Prerequisite(s)/Course Notes:
    DNCE 013A  or permission of instructor. Open only to nondance majors. May be repeated once for credit.



  
  • DNCE 014F - First-Year Seminar

    Semester Hours: 3-4
    Fall
    This course gives first-year students the opportunity to work in a seminar format with a member of the faculty in an area of the faculty member’s research interests.

    Prerequisite(s)/Course Notes:
    The course is open to first-year students only. Topics vary by semester. This course is offered for distribution credit; consult the Semester Planning Guide for proper category listing. Students may take only one 014F or 012F seminar and only one 014S or 012S seminar.



  
  • DNCE 014S - First-Year Seminar

    Semester Hours: 3-4


    Spring
    This course gives first-year students the opportunity to work in a seminar format with a member of the faculty in an area of the faculty member’s research interests.

     

    Prerequisite(s)/Course Notes:
    The course is open to first-year students only. Topics vary by semester. This course is offered for distribution credit; consult the Semester Planning Guide for proper category listing. Students may take only one 014F or 012F seminar and only one 014S or 012S seminar.



  
  • DNCE 015 - (CP) Ballet I

    Semester Hours: 2-3
    Fall
    One of the technique classes designed for the dance major-to continue over a three-year range of study. Emphasis on technical development, mastery of stylistic variation, the extension of expressive potentialities and the understanding of the basic concepts of classical, neoclassical and contemporary ballet. New students are assigned to a section appropriate to their level of experience, knowledge and achievement.

    Prerequisite(s)/Course Notes:
    Open only to dance  and dance education  majors or by permission of instructor. Course includes required 90 minute ballet lab and may include a Pilates lab. May be repeated once for credit.  



  
  • DNCE 015A - (CP) Ballet IA

    Semester Hours: 2
    Fall
    One of the technique classes designed for the nonmajor to continue over a two-year range of study. Emphasis on technical development, mastery of stylistic variation, the extension of expressive potentialities, and the understanding of the basic concepts of classical, neoclassical and contemporary ballet.

    Prerequisite(s)/Course Notes:
    May be repeated once for credit.



  
  • DNCE 016 - (CP) Ballet II

    Semester Hours: 2-3
    Spring

    One of the technique classes designed for the dance major-to continue over a three-year range of study. Emphasis on technical development, mastery of stylistic variation, the extension of expressive potentialities and the understanding of the basic concepts of classical, neoclassical and contemporary ballet. New students are assigned to a section appropriate to their level of experience, knowledge and achievement.

    Prerequisite(s)/Course Notes:
    Open only to dance  and dance education  majors or by permission of instructor. Course includes a required 90-minute laboratory component and may include a Pilates lab. May be repeated once for credit. (Formerly 16M.)



  
  • DNCE 016A - (CP) Ballet IIA

    Semester Hours: 2
    Spring
    One of the technique classes designed for the nonmajor to continue over a two-year range of study. Emphasis on technical development, mastery of stylistic variation, the extension of expressive potentialities and the understanding of the basic concepts of classical, neoclassical and contemporary ballet.

    Prerequisite(s)/Course Notes:
    DNCE 015A  or permission of instructor. May be repeated once for credit.



  
  • DNCE 017 - (CP) Ballet III

    Semester Hours: 2-3
    Fall

    One of the technique classes designed for the dance major-to continue over a three-year range of study. Emphasis on technical development, mastery of stylistic variation, the extension of expressive potentialities and the understanding of the basic concepts of classical, neoclassical and contemporary ballet. New students are assigned to a section appropriate to their level of experience, knowledge and achievement.

    Prerequisite(s)/Course Notes:
    Open only to dance  and dance education  majors or by permission of instructor. Course includes a required 90-minute laboratory component and may include a Pilates lab. May be repeated once for credit.



  
  • DNCE 017A - (CP) Ballet IIIA

    Semester Hours: 2
    Fall
    One of the technique classes designed for the nonmajor to continue over a two-year range of study. Emphasis on technical development, mastery of stylistic variation, the extension of expressive potentialities, and the understanding of the basic concepts of classical, neoclassical and contemporary ballet.

    Prerequisite(s)/Course Notes:
    DNCE 015A  and 016A  or permission of instructor. May be repeated once for credit.



  
  • DNCE 018 - Ballet IV

    Semester Hours: 2-3
    Spring

    One of the technique classes designed for the dance major-to continue over a three-year range of study. Emphasis on technical development, mastery of stylistic variation, the extension of expressive potentialities and the understanding of the basic concepts of classical, neoclassical and contemporary ballet. New students are assigned to a section appropriate to their level of experience, knowledge and achievement.

    Prerequisite(s)/Course Notes:
    Open only to dance  and dance education  majors or by permission of instructor. Course includes a required 90-minute laboratory component and may include a Pilates lab. May be repeated once for credit.



  
  • DNCE 025 - The Art of Dance Production

    Semester Hours: 3
    Fall

    A survey course in basic theater technology as it applies to dance, including fundamental concepts essential to the running of a dance company or dance school. Emphasis also on ways to present oneself as a dance artist via social media, and on writing of fact sheets, press releases, press kits, resumes, grants, and key elements of contract agreements. Oral presentations supported by visual, auditory and/or technological aids will be utilized.

    Prerequisite(s)/Course Notes:
    This course is for dance majors only, or by permission of the professor. Students are encouraged to take DRAM 055  concurrently with this class.



  
  
  • DNCE 035 - Introduction to Laban Movement Analysis

    Semester Hours: 2
    Periodically
    A systematic study of Laban Movement Analysis (LMA) describing concepts and principles of human movement, including an overview of the Bartenieff Fundamentals, which are both a movement technique and an integrative tool for reeducating the body. The course will help students further develop the mental focus and emotional responsiveness necessary for both the dancer and the actor. It will also examine the principles of LMA as they apply to dance choreography, acting, and pedagogy.

    Prerequisite(s)/Course Notes:
    This course is designed for dance and drama  students. Same as DRAM 035 .  May not be taken on a Pass/D+/D/Fail basis. No liberal arts credit.



  
  • DNCE 037 - (AA) Black Performance Art: an Evolution of Expression

    Semester Hours: 3
    This course will excavate and illuminate the evolution of the rich cultural expression of Black Americans in Musical Theatre, Dramatic Productions, and Concert Dance, as a response to the socio-political conditions of Black life in the United States from the Harlem Renaissance through the Black Arts Movement (1920-1975). The course will forward a new concept that the Black creative response, resulting in parallel trajectories of these forms of expression, impacted and were impacted by the history of the United States, and flourished, voicing a reaction to social and political upheaval, sometimes through satirical humor, other times with great passion and anger.

    Prerequisite(s)/Course Notes:
    Credit will be given for DNCE 037 or AFST 037 , not both.



  
  • DNCE 038 - Pilates Method

    Semester Hours: 1


    Fall, Spring

    This course will cultivate and develop a familiarity with the vocabulary, technical exercises and conceptual framework of the Pilates Method. In addition to learning the basic mat exercises of the Pilates Method, students will also learn about the anatomy of the human body as it pertains to each exercise. Movement exploration and physical conditioning using information from other movement modalities will also be introduced.

    Prerequisite(s)/Course Notes:
    May be repeated for credit. No liberal arts credit. Pass/Fail grade only.



  
  • DNCE 039 - (CC, CP) The Dance Practices of the African Diaspora and the American Experience

    Semester Hours: 3
    Fall
    This is a studio course introducing students to American dance aesthetics and practices with a focus on how its evolution has been influenced by African American choreographers and dancers. An ongoing study of movement practices from traditional African dances, dances of the African Diaspora, American Jazz dance, modern dance, and American ballet will be complemented by readings, video viewings, guest speakers and creation of dance studies.

    Prerequisite(s)/Course Notes:
    Same as AFST 039 .



  
  • DNCE 040 - (CP) Tap Dance I

    Semester Hours: 2
    Fall
    This course offers instruction in tap dance technique and improvisation, and a study of the artistic development of tap dance in its cultural contexts. Students will be introduced to different styles, including Rhythm Tap, Broadway Tap and Contemporary Tap.

    Prerequisite(s)/Course Notes:
    Open to non-dance majors and dance majors . This course is appropriate for students who have never studied tap dance or who have studied it for fewer than four years. May be repeated once for credit. (Formerly Tap Dance.)



  
  • DNCE 041 - (CP) Tap Dance II

    Semester Hours: 2
    Spring
    This course offers instruction in intermediate/advanced tap dance technique and improvisation, and a study of the artistic development of tap dance in its cultural contexts. Students will be introduced to different styles, including Rhythm Tap, Broadway Tap and Contemporary Tap.

    Prerequisite(s)/Course Notes:
    Open to non-dance majors and dance majors  who have studied tap dance for at least four years, or permission of instructor. May be repeated once for credit.



  
  • DNCE 047 - (CP) Hip-Hop

    Semester Hours: 2
    Periodically

    This course will provide students with an introduction to hip-hop dance technique and an overview of hip-hop culture, including music, clothing, hairstyles and language. Students will learn several styles and forms of hip-hop. Emphasis will be on the development and performance of hip-hop combinations.

    Prerequisite(s)/Course Notes:
    Open to non-dance majors and dance majors. May be repeated once for credit. May not be taken on a Pass/D+/D/Fail basis.



  
  
  
  
  
  • DNCE 110 - (CP) Irish Dance Steps and Studies

    Semester Hours: 3
    Periodically
    This course offers an in-depth look at both the cultural history and contemporary practice of Irish dance.  We will divide our time between learning traditional Irish step dances and analyzing the effects of nationalism, religion, emigration, and globalization on the dance’s form and function. We will also survey the history of ballet in Ireland and examine the country’s burgeoning contemporary dance scene. Independent research projects on local Irish dance schools, sessions, or performances will enable students to take advantage of our proximity to New York’s thriving Irish music and dance community.

    Prerequisite(s)/Course Notes:
    Same as IRE 110 . May be repeated for credit.



  
  • DNCE 111 - Modern Dance V

    Semester Hours: 2-4
    Fall
    One of the technique classes in contemporary dance forms designed for the dance major to continue over a four-year range of study. Emphasis on technical development, theories and discussion related to expressive potentialities and the mastery of stylistic variation in contemporary forms of movement. Assignment of students to one of the sections is based on prior experience, study and advancement.

    Prerequisite(s)/Course Notes:
    Open only to dance  and dance education  majors or by permission of instructor. Course includes required modern dance lab and may include a Pilates lab. May be repeated once for credit. (Formerly 111M.)



  
  • DNCE 112 - Modern Dance VI

    Semester Hours: 2-4
    Spring
    One of the technique classes in contemporary dance forms designed for the dance major to continue over a four-year range of study. Emphasis on technical development, theories and discussion related to expressive potentialities and the mastery of stylistic variation in contemporary forms of movement. Assignment of students to one of the sections is based on prior experience, study and advancement.

    Prerequisite(s)/Course Notes:
    Open only to dance  and dance education  majors or by permission of instructor. Course includes required modern dance lab and may include a Pilates lab. May be repeated once for credit. (Formerly 112M.)



 

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