Dec 08, 2022  
2004-2005 Graduate Bulletin 
    
2004-2005 Graduate Bulletin [ARCHIVED BULLETIN]

General University Information


Entries appear in alphabetical order. Click on a link to be taken to the entry below.

 

 


Basic Regulations Governing Graduate Programs

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All graduate students will be governed by the regulations and requirements specified in the Graduate Studies Bulletin in effect at the time of first graduate program matriculation at Hofstra. Refer to the major area for specific requirements.

  1. Students who wish to study for graduate degrees, certificates or diplomas should apply to the Office of Graduate Admissions for acceptance in their major programs before commencing graduate study. Until they have been accepted in their major area, they have no assurance that any credits they receive will apply toward their degree. Nonmatriculated students must make application for acceptance in their major area before they have completed 12 semester hours at the University unless they have written approval from the appropriate graduate Director to continue their studies on a nonmatriculated basis.
  2. Grading in graduate courses includes the categories A, B, C, D, F and P/F. Alphabetical grades are further divided into plus and minus levels (see Grades). No credit will be allowed toward graduate degrees for D grades. Graduate students may repeat courses in which they receive D grades.
  3. An Incomplete grade will be given at the discretion of the instructor in a graduate course and only under unusual circumstances. Incomplete work must be completed and submitted to the instructor for a grade by the end of one calendar year from the close of the semester or session in which the course was taken.
  4. Students who wish to withdraw from a course must secure the appropriate forms at the Student Administrative Complex located in Memorial Hall or online and return the completed form to the Office of Student Accounts by the last day of classes prior to the start of the designated final examination period. The student may withdraw without the approval or agreement of the instructor. If a student withdraws after the first 1/4 of the course a grade of W will appear on the transcript.
  5. All credits applied toward the master’s degree must be earned within the period of five years starting from the date of completion of the first course applicable to the degree. Exceptions will be made for any period of intervening military service.
  6. As a condition for graduation, the master’s candidate must successfully complete a comprehensive or language examination requirement or a substantive equivalent in the major area of study. This grade must be reported by the major department to the Office of Academic Records no later than December 1, May 1, or August 1 in the semester in which the degree will be granted. No advanced degree will be conferred upon a candidate who fails this examination more than once. A request for a review of a comprehensive examination must be made within one (1) year of the date the examination was taken. The examination is offered twice during the year, in October and March. (Exception: Psychology, see Degree Requirements for each program.) Exact dates are determined at the beginning of each semester. It is the student’s responsibility to be informed of the time and place of the examination.
  7. No graduate credit will be granted for courses numbered below 200 in the Hofstra system.
  8. Graduate students, with the permission of their graduate adviser, chairperson of the department in which the course is offered, and course instructor, may take up to two 2000-level courses (not to exceed 8 s.h.). 2000- level courses are graduate courses offered in conjunction with 100-level courses, for which graduate students are expected to fulfill substantially enhanced requirements. No student, however may enroll in a 2000-level course if he/she received undergraduate credit for the equivalent undergraduate course.
  9. No credit will be allowed for courses taken at another school while enrolled in a degree program at Hofstra unless they are relevant to the student’s program of study and are approved in advance on an official form available in the Office of Academic Records.
  10. Courses numbered 251 and 252 should be devoted to independent readings under the direction of a faculty member assigned to the graduate student applying for such credits. A maximum of six semester hours of credit may be earned toward a graduate degree in 251 and 252 courses.
  11. A graduate student who has not completed the work in courses 301 and 302 must maintain matriculation each subsequent semester until the requirements of the course have been completed. This will require paying a matriculation fee if the student is not enrolled in one or more regular credit courses.
  12. Whenever matriculated graduate students wish to transfer candidacy from one major area to another, they must initiate their request on an official form which is available at the Office of Graduate Admissions.
  13. The academic standing of all graduate students will be reviewed at the end of each fall and spring semester. It is necessary for graduate students to earn a cumulative 3.0 grade-point average or better as required by specific programs to be considered in good standing and for graduation. Students who fail to maintain a minimum 3.0 grade-point average will have their status reviewed by the Director of their graduate program and the chairperson of the department. Any student presenting a grade-point average of less than 3.0 at the end of the semester will be placed on academic probation.* Students who have accumulated 25 percent or more of total attempted semester hours in INC’s which have stood longer than the time allowed for completion, W’s and NC’s, may be placed on probation after due consideration by the program Director and the department chairperson. Students enrolled in courses for two consecutive probationary periods and who have not raised their grade-point average to the required 3.0 or better by the conclusion of the second probationary period are subject to dismissal. A graduate student with especially serious academic deficiencies is subject to immediate dismissal when such deficiencies make it apparent that the student’s continuation in the program will not result in his or her successful completion of the program. Dismissed students may petition for readmission no sooner than one full year following the dismissal. However, they may be readmitted only under special circumstances and after a careful review of their case by either the Program Director, chairperson or dean and the faculty of their major area.
  14. Graduate students clearly guilty of gross and unambiguous violations of academic honesty (e.g., cheating on exams or graded projects, quoting a substantial portion of a source verbatim without citation) shall be suspended or dismissed. Graduate students clearly guilty of other forms of academic dishonesty (particularly those concerning a more sophisticated understanding of the use of sources and development of an authorial voice) shall be subject to a range of penalties, including rewriting the assignment, failure of the assignment or of the course, or suspension/dismissal from the University. For further details concerning violations of academic honesty within graduate study as well as procedures for handling such violations and for reviewing and appealing charges of academic dishonesty, see Faculty Policy Series 11G.
  15. Students studying for master’s degrees must complete at least 24 semester hours of their course work (not including elementary school student teaching) in residence at Hofstra.

Master’s Essay or Thesis

Unless departmental arrangements specify otherwise, after the essay has been approved, it must be typed in final form. The original and a duplicate copy, after being signed by both the adviser and the department chairperson, are submitted to the major department or graduate area for binding. Both copies must be submitted no later than the last day of classes of the semester or summer session when the degree is expected to be conferred. Copies are bound in prescribed form. See Tuition and Fees. If time of payment for binding is not indicated in the course description, students should consult their major department or graduate area. The bound original is filed in the Axinn Library and a duplicate copy in the office of the department which supervised the essay. (For exceptions to the essay requirement, see departmental programs.)

Part-time students should arrange to take not more than three semester hours of course work in addition to 301 or 302 in each of the semesters during which they are writing their essays. All subjects must be approved by the chairperson of the department in which the work is to be done.

Application for Graduation

Candidates for graduation must file an application for graduation in the Office of Academic Records not later than October 1 for December graduates and March 1 for May graduates. August candidates must file by June 15 for Summer Session I, July 15 for Summer Session II, and August 16 for Summer Session III. There is a fee for late filing. See Tuition and Fees.

All requirements applicable toward a degree, certificate or diploma must be completed and on record in the Office of Academic Records by the end of the first week of June for May degrees, the end of the first week of January for December degrees, and the end of the first week of September for August degrees.

Final Semester Registration

Students who have been granted permission to complete final semester requirements and maintain matriculation while not attending classes must pay a Maintaining Matriculation Fee and file a registration card during the regular registration period for their final semester or session. This applies equally to students who are completing their work for the master’s essay although not currently enrolled for the 301-302 courses. This fee also applies to each Fall or Spring semester of study taken by a student at another institution, either within the United States or elsewhere.

Commencement

Commencement programs are conducted twice each year, in December and in May. Summer candidates are invited to the December exercises and are listed in the program. Information regarding programs is automatically mailed to candidates about six weeks before commencements.

Basic Regulations Governing Doctoral Programs

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Admission

  1. An acceptable baccalaureate degree from an accredited institution is required for admission to courses in a doctoral program unless extraordinary circumstances prevail.
  2. In addition to other screening procedures, some form of broad area and/or aptitude examination such as the MAT or GRE is required for admission as a matriculated doctoral student.
  3. Adequate evidence of students’ ability to do quality doctoral work must be obtained, at a point in their studies to be determined by each program, before they are accepted as doctoral candidates.
  4. A nonrefundable tuition deposit of $250 is required of all accepted full-time doctoral students. When registering for the semester for which the student has been admitted, the deposit will be credited toward tuition.

Degree Requirements

Residency

  1. The minimum residence requirement is defined as 30 semester hours within a period of two consecutive years (which may include three summers).
  2. A residence plan of study specifying the activities and alternative means of using the residency time allotment must be submitted by the candidate and approved by the adviser and the department chairperson prior to the start of formal residency. The department chairperson and adviser may stipulate the terms of the plan in granting approval.
  3. At least half of the course work required for the doctorate must be taken at Hofstra during the ten-year period
    preceding the conferral of the degree.

Time limitation

  1. The above restrictions also set a limit of ten years from admission as a matriculated doctoral student to the completion of all degree requirements.
  2. After the student has been accepted as a doctoral candidate, all credit applied toward the doctoral degree must be earned within a period of five years preceding the granting of the degree.
  3. A student who has been accepted for a doctoral program but has not taken at least one course within one year after acceptance must make reapplication for admission to the doctoral program through the Office of Graduate Admissions.

Tool requirements

  1. Ph.D. candidates must generally satisfy two tool requirements: examinations in two foreign languages, or one in a foreign language and one in a tool subject such as statistics or computer problems, as determined by the department. The exception to the above is in the Ph.D. Program in Clinical and School Psychology and the Psy.D. Program in School-Community Psychology where a foreign language is not required. A candidate may satisfy the statistics requirement either by passing a competency examination or by successfully completing course work as determined by the department recommending the degree. Such course work is subject to the same time limitation set for courses noted above. Courses taken to prepare for such examinations may not be part of the number of credits required for the degree.
  2. Ed.D. candidates will be required to satisfy only the tool requirement in statistics.

Academic Standing

The academic standing of all graduate students will be reviewed each year. It is necessary for graduate students to earn a 3.0 grade-point average or better, as required by the program, to be considered in good standing. Students who have failed to maintain a 2.5 grade-point average or better, as required by the program, will be dropped immediately. Those who have failed to maintain a 3.0 grade-point average or better, as required by the program, will have their status reviewed by the director of their major program and the chairperson. If the director or chairperson feels they have failed to demonstrate adequate competence in their major area, they will be dropped from the University. These students may petition for readmission no sooner than one full year following the dismissal. They may be readmitted, however, only under special circumstances after a careful review of their case by either the director or chairperson and the faculty of their major area.

Comprehensive Examination

All doctoral candidates must take a doctoral comprehensive examination.

Doctoral Dissertation

  1. Doctoral candidates must write a dissertation under the guidance of a sponsoring committee consisting of three full-time faculty members holding an earned doctorate.
  2. The dissertation must then be defended orally before a committee, of a minimum of five faculty members.
  3. The sponsoring committee will be part of the defense committee.
  4. Course work may not be substituted for the dissertation.
  5. All work on the dissertation, including data analysis, is to be done by the student under the advisement of her/his committee. If another person is consulted for help, the student must obtain permission. Not obtaining permission for outside help with the research is cause for dismissal from the program. Contact the major program for specific information.

Transfer Credits

Doctoral candidates offering transfer credits must complete a minimum of half the total course work required for the doctorate at Hofstra. If the candidate holds a master’s degree from Hofstra, the completion of 54 semester hours (credits earned toward a master’s degree may be included) of course work is required for the doctorate in residence. In other cases, a minimum of 45 semester hours must be completed at Hofstra.

Academic Honesty

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A University is a community of faculty, administrators and students dedicated to the pursuit of learning and to the creation of new knowledge. Every individual in this community has an obligation to uphold its intellectual standards, which alone make education worthwhile. It is the responsibility of the faculty not only to share its knowledge, but also to communicate understanding of, and respect for, the process by which knowledge is produced. The goal of most graduate study is individual synthesis and analysis, and the independent evaluation by students of others’ work. Thus, students play an active role in their own education, and each student bears responsibility for his or her work. Anyone who refuses this responsibility both misses the point of a graduate education and proves unworthy of it.

A student who commits any act of academic dishonesty, including knowingly helping another student to commit such an act, is rejecting the responsibility that is inherent in the pursuit of learning and may forfeit the right to remain a member of the academic community, particularly if he or she is unwilling or unable to recognize the seriousness of the offense and fails to demonstrate such recognition by abstaining from further violation of academic propriety.

One learns and contributes to the body of knowledge by reviewing work already done and by using it as the basis for generating new ideas, discovering new data, and drawing new conclusions. Though the process of learning is undeniably collaborative, one’s achievement in that process is assessed on the basis of one’s individual contribution. Academic honesty requires carefully distinguishing one’s own work from that of others. Each individual must fully acknowledge when, where, and how his or her work refers to or depends on that of others. This means carefully tracing the boundary between others’ efforts and one’s own, clearly noting where others’ work leaves off and one’s own begins.

The academic community assumes that work of any kind-whether a research paper, a critical essay, a homework assignment, a test or quiz, a computer program, or a creative assignment in any medium-is done, entirely and without assistance, by the individual whose name it bears. (If joint projects are assigned, then the work is expected to be wholly the work of those whose names it bears.) If the work contains facts, ideas, opinions, discoveries, words, or other elements found in sources, these must be fully and appropriately acknowledged, following a prescribed format for doing so. In general terms, the conventional format consists of a bibliography (a list of sources) coupled with footnotes or parenthetical citations that serve to identify the precise derivation of each idea, fact, paraphrase, or quotation that comes from another’s work.

For further information about policies and procedures concerning violations of academic honesty, consult Faculty Policy Series 11G in the Guide to Pride and at the University Senate Web site (http://www.hofstra.edu/senate/senate_fps_toc.cfm).

Policy for Dismissal and Appeal of Dismissal from a Graduate/Post-Graduate Program

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(not applicable to Law School)
(for Dismissal due to Academic Dishonesty, consult FPS 11G)

Dismissal

The Director of a graduate program shall notify a student of his/her dismissal from that program in writing (certified return receipt requested) within 7 days following the decision to dismiss. The notification shall state the reasons for the dismissal and shall be as explicit as possible. The letter shall indicate the appeal procedures specified below. A copy of the letter shall be sent to the Chair, the appropriate Dean, the Provost and the Office of Academic Records.

The student is given 15 days after receiving notification of dismissal to decide whether or not to appeal the dismissal. During that time, the student is permitted to continue course work in progress. If a student chooses not to appeal, 15 days after receiving notification of dismissal the student will no longer be permitted to continue course work in progress, to sit in on classes, or to register for additional classes.

Appeals:

If dismissal occurs during the semester and the student appeals the decision, the student shall be permitted to continue course work already in progress unless extenuating circumstances have been determined. Grades shall be withheld until the appeal process has been completed. Unless the appeal is successful, no grade or credit will be awarded.

However, if a student is registered for a course that involves an outside internship (including but not limited to field experience, practicum, student teaching), the student may not continue the course during the appeal process unless extenuating circumstances have been determined.

If dismissal occurs at the completion of a semester and the student appeals the decision, the student may not register for or sit in on any courses unless extenuating circumstances have been determined.

Step 1:

The first appeal is at the program level. The student may appeal this decision in writing to the Director of the Program within 15 days from the date of receipt of the letter of dismissal. The letter of appeal shall include the grounds for appealing the dismissal. If no letter is forthcoming, the right of the student to further appeal is waived.

An ad hoc committee of program faculty and the department Chair shall be constituted and chaired by the Director. The Director of the Program shall inform the student in writing (certified return receipt requested) of the date, time and location of the Program ad hoc committee meeting. The student must inform the Program Director if he/she chooses to appear before the committee. The student may be accompanied by one adviser of his/her choosing. Under no condition shall the adviser address the committee.

The Director shall inform the student in writing (certified return receipt requested) of the decision of the Committee within 15 days from the date of the receipt of the appeal letter. (A copy of the letter shall be sent to the Chair, the appropriate Dean, the Provost and the Office of Academic Records.) The student may appeal this decision in writing.

Step 2:

The second appeal is at the Dean’s level. The student may appeal in writing to the Dean within 15 days of the receipt of the Program’s decision. If no letter is forthcoming, the right of the student to further appeal is waived.

The Dean shall conduct a full review of the appeal, which may include independent research and/or discussion with the program’s Ad Hoc Committee. The Dean shall inform the student in writing (certified return receipt requested) of his/her decision within 15 days from the date of receipt of the appeal letter. (A copy of the letter shall be sent to the Program Director, the Chair, the Provost and the Office of Academic Records.) The student may appeal this decision in writing.

Step 3:

The final appeal is at the Provost’s level. The student may appeal in writing to the Provost within 15 days of the receipt of the Dean’s decision.

The Provost shall inform the student in writing (certified return receipt requested) of his/her decision within 15 days from the date of the receipt of the appeal letter. The Provost’s decision is final. (A copy of the letter shall be sent to the Program Director, the Chair, the appropriate Dean and the Office of Academic Records.)

Academic Calendar

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The Academic Calendar

Highlights of the calendar for the 2004-2005 academic year appear on the inside front and inside back covers of this publication. The program of regular semesters is based on a two semester calendar with fall classes beginning on September 7, 2004, and concluding on December 18, 2004. All spring semester classes begin January 26, 2005, and end May 20, 2005. Credit courses are offered during the January session, January 3-24, 2005, Summer Session I, May 31-July 1, 2005, Summer Session II, July 5-August 5, 2005, Summer Session III, August 8-26, 2005. For information, consult the Graduate Admissions Office.

Class Schedules

Classes are typically scheduled during the evening hours beginning at 4:25 p.m. Monday through Thursday. Some programs offer weekday and weekend classes. Specific class offerings are available in each semester’s class scheduling publication.

January Session

This is a three-week session starting the first week in January. Students attending this session may not earn more than three semester hours of credit or four semester hours of credit if offered on that basis.

Summer Sessions

The University offers a full program of day and evening graduate courses. There are two separate five-week sessions and one three week academic session each summer.

No graduate student may enroll in one summer session for more than 6 semester hours, or if 3- and 4- credit hour courses, 7 semester hours. Exceptions to the above may be granted when special circumstances and the student’s special capacities for the work permit. Written approval is required of the dean of the academic unit of the major or proposed major field of study.

Students may obtain credit on their Hofstra records for courses taken in the summer session at another accredited institution if the courses have been approved in advance by the appropriate department and the Office of Academic Records, and are in accordance with the Advanced Standing Policy and the Graduate Transfer Regulations set forth in the Hofstra Graduate Studies Bulletin.

Course Numbering System and Semester Hours

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Course Numbering System

The Graduate Studies Bulletin lists all the graduate courses offered by the University in its programs.

Courses numbered 200 and above are for graduate credit. 200 and above level business courses are open only to matriculated Zarb School of Business graduate students.

2000-level courses are graduate courses offered in conjunction with 100-level courses, for which graduate students are expected to fulfill substantially enhanced requirements.

Course numbers may be separated by a comma, hyphen or ampersand. For example:

Course 1, 2 indicates that either course may be elected for credit independently of the other.
Course 1-2 indicates that course 1 must be completed before course 2 is taken, and that no credit toward a Hofstra degree is given for a hyphenated course until both semesters of work are satisfactorily completed.
Course 1 & 2 indicates that course 1 may be elected for credit without course 2, but course 2 may not be taken until course 1 has been satisfactorily completed.

Course numbers with A through Z designations usually indicate that as individual subjects are selected, each is assigned a letter and added to the course number. The course may be taken any number of times as long as there is a different letter designation each time it is taken. The University reserves the right to withdraw any scheduled course without notice.

Semester Hour (s.h.)

Semester hour is the term used to describe the number of credits received by the student for successfully completing a specific course. Courses are generally assigned between 1 and 6 semester hours.

Grades

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The alphabetical grades, including plus (+) and minus (-), have the following grade-point values:

A = 4.0   C = 2.0
A- = 3.7   C- = 1.7
B+ = 3.3   D+ = 1.3
B = 3.0   D = 1.0
B- = 2.7   F = 0.0
C+ = 2.3   (only one F grade in any one course will be included in the cumulative GPA)

To determine cumulative GPA, multiply the number of semester hours of each grade earned by the grade-point value for that grade. Then total the products and divide by the total number of semester hours attempted.

Hofstra uses an alphabetical system of grades, including plus (+) and minus (-), to describe the quality of the student’s work. Final grades are reported to the Office of Academic Records and can be accessed online.

Degrees with Distinction

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The University will confer the graduate degree with distinction on students who have attained a minimum gradepoint average of 3.75 with at least 80% of the credits for the degree earned at Hofstra.

Individual Records

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Availability of Records

The University complies with all provisions of Public Law 93-380 (Privacy Rights of Parents and Students-disclosure
law). Students may make an appointment with their Graduate Program Director to inspect any record included in the
terms of the Law.

The Buckley Amendment

In compliance with the Family Education Rights & Privacy Act (Buckley Amendment), this statement reflects Hofstra University’s policy.

The following directory information may be released by telephone: a) student’s dates of attendance; b) date of graduation and degree earned. Other kinds of directory information, such as a student’s address, telephone listing, major field of study, awards received, and the most recent previous education agency or previous institution attended, will be released only in response to a written request. Hofstra reserves the right to refuse the above information if the reason for the request is not considered to be a sufficient need to know.

Information regarding the student’s record: grades, courses, GPA, social security number and other personal information will not be released without the student’s written consent.

The Solomon Amendment

In accordance with the Solomon Amendment, the University will make accessible to the Secretary of Defense, directory information including each student’s name, address, telephone listing, date and place of birth, level of education, academic major, degrees received and the educational institution the student was most recently enrolled in. However, the University will not provide directory information for specific students who formally request that such information be withheld from third parties.

A form to request nondisclosure of directory information must be filed by the student. This form is available at the Student Administrative Complex, Memorial Hall.

Exclusion From the University

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When students make application for entrance to Hofstra University, they understand and agree that the University reserves the right to exclude any student at any time for conduct or academic standing regarded by the University as undesirable, without assigning any further reason. It is understood and agreed that the University, or any of its officers or faculty, shall not be liable in any way for such exclusion.

To insure the protection of each individual’s rights, procedures for appeal are provided by the University to assure the student fair treatment in cases of disciplinary action.

Change of Address/Name

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Students must report a change of their home or local address to the Office of Academic Records or to a Student Accounts Representative immediately, located in the Student Administrative Complex, Memorial Hall.

Change of Major/Minor/Specialization/Concentration/Degree

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In order to facilitate orientation and advisement of a student to his or her new major, students must report any change in their major, minor, specialization, concentration, or degree on the official Change of Study form to the Graduate Program Director and the Office of Academic Records. Any change requires a signature from the new department indicating that the student has notified that department and has been made aware of all requirements. Students are not required to obtain a signature from the program or major they are leaving.