Jul 03, 2022  
2019-2020 Undergraduate Bulletin 
    
2019-2020 Undergraduate Bulletin [ARCHIVED BULLETIN]

Course Descriptions


 

School of Engineering and Applied Science (SEAS)

  

Science, Technology, Engineering and Mathematics (STEM)

  
  

Secondary Education (SED)

  
  
  
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    SED 100M - Applications of Technology in Music Education

    Semester Hours: 1
    January
    Development of basic music computer skills and professional portfolio. Includes sequencer software and its application to creative student assignments, the operation and educational application of one-piece music workstations, fundamentals of computer-assisted composition and music printing techniques, fundamentals of synthesizer programming and identification of available WEB resources. Emphasis is on the use and evaluation of software and teaching aids, the application of this knowledge to teaching at different age levels, and methods for teaching children to use technology effectively in their musical experiences.

    Prerequisite(s)/Course Notes:
    Students will be required to utilize and build upon information gained in this course in several other music courses throughout their undergraduate degree program. As such, students who have passed SED 100M will be granted access privileges to the Music Technology Lab (210 Emily Lowe) to continue their work and study in this area.


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    SED 113 - The Teaching of Art

    Semester Hours: 3
    Fall
    Study of perceptual stages of development, preK-6, with a view toward designing a qualitative and creative art program. In addition to the study of major art media, students learn to stimulate an appreciation of art through multicultural art history and aesthetics. Subjects covered include models for curriculum design, multiculturalism, interdisciplinary art education, modes of assessment, the museum as educator and art for students with special needs. Classroom observations (20 hours) and lesson demonstrations are required.

    Prerequisite(s)/Course Notes:
    There is a materials fee of $10. This course is not for the elementary classroom teacher. Both this course and SED 114  are prerequisites for student teaching and should be taken in sequence when possible.


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    SED 114 - The Teaching of Art

    Semester Hours: 3
    Spring
    Study of perceptual stages of development, K-12, with a view towards designing a qualitative and creative art program. In addition to the study of major art media, students learn to stimulate an appreciation of art through multicultural art history and aesthetics. Subjects covered include models for curriculum design, multiculturalism, interdisciplinary art education, modes of assessment, the museum as educator and art for students with special needs. Classroom observations (20 hours) and lesson demonstrations are required.

    Prerequisite(s)/Course Notes:
    For undergraduates: SED 151 , 102 . There is a material fee of $10. Note: SED 113  is not for the elementary classroom teacher. Both SED 113  and this course are prerequisites for student teaching and should be taken in sequence when possible.


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    SED 152 - Teaching of English

    Semester Hours: 3
    Fall
    This course provides preparation for teaching English language and literature in New York state middle schools and high schools. Consideration is given to teaching methodologies that promote reading, writing and literacy from a multicultural perspective in an inclusive classroom environment. Student assignments and assessments reflect the New York State Learning Standards for the English Language Arts. The course focuses on literacy concerns and issues, instructional planning, classroom organization, providing for students with special needs, integrating technology, student assessment, and developing reflective practices in the teaching of English language arts. Consideration is given to how best to meet the needs of a diverse group of students by individualizing instruction and using differentiated texts.

    Prerequisite(s)/Course Notes:
    SED 151 . Must be taken concurrently with SED 152L . May not be taken on a Pass/D+/D/Fail basis.


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    SED 178 - Reflective Practice and Classroom Analysis

    Semester Hours: 3
    Fall, Spring
    The implications of reflective practice and classroom analysis on the understanding of teaching practice and pedagogical approaches; promoting literacy in the content areas; addressing the needs of diverse learners and for those whose native language is not English. Student teachers explore ways to analyze their work as teachers including formal analytical techniques, team-building dialogues, journaling, portfolios, e-mail networking, and audio and video analysis of teaching practice. Integrates topics from prior education classes including educational technology, inclusion, and literacy. Completion of an electronic portfolio as a culminating activity in the secondary education program is required.

    Prerequisite(s)/Course Notes:
    Must be taken concurrently with SED 179 .


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    SED 179 - Student Teaching (Undergraduate)

    Semester Hours: 6
    Fall, Spring
    Full-time student teaching in cooperating schools with direction and supervision from University supervisors. Students have two placements during the semester: one at the middle school level (7-9) and the other at the senior high school level (10-12). Attendance at weekly seminars is required. Student teachers review content area planning including assessment, inclusion, diversity, literacy, resources, and technology and relate pedagogy to content. Special required seminars address issues of child abuse and abduction; substance abuse; and safety, fire and arson.

    Prerequisite(s)/Course Notes:
    Nineteen (19) semester hours of professional education course work, the appropriate methods courses, appropriate grade point averages, and official acceptance into Student Teaching. Admission by application and interview only. Application may be obtained at the Office of Field Placement and returned by May 1 for the succeeding spring semester and by February 15 for the succeeding fall semester. For admission criteria, see individual programs. Corequisite: SED 178 . Pass/D+/D/Fail grade only.


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Sociology (SOC)

  
  
  
  
  
  
  
  
  
  
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    SOC 018A - Classical Sociological Theory

    Semester Hours: 3
    Fall, Spring
    This course provides a foundation in the classical tradition in sociological thought, and will cover the 19th through the early 20th century. The pivotal contributions of such theorists as Karl Marx, Max Weber, and Emile Durkheim provide the core of the focus. Late 19th- and early 20th-century theorists who followed in their footsteps show the continuity of sociological thought and its connection to social issues of the day. One of the important themes of the course is the relevance of social theory to understanding contemporary social issues. As a required component of the major sequence, the course includes an emphasis on written work and oral participation as essential aspects of intellectual growth and development.

    Prerequisite(s)/Course Notes:
    SOC 004 . Credit given for this course or SOC 018, not both. Open only to majors  and minors  in sociology or with permission of instructor. May not be taken on a Pass/D+/D/Fail basis.


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    SOC 037 - (BH) Poverty, Hunger and Social Policy

    Semester Hours: 3
    Periodically
    Can social policies be effective against poverty? What are the consequences of aiding, or not aiding, poor families? This course addresses these questions by focusing on the process and consequences of social policy, with an emphasis on the United States. With, an emphasis on hunger and food redistribution policy, the course explores the politics and the development of poverty, implementation and effects of social welfare policies aimed at impoverished families.In particular, the course explores the politics of poverty and the development, implementation and effects of social welfare policies aimed at impoverished families. There is a consistent focus on how class, gender, race, and the normative functions of the nuclear family intersect with the process of constructing social policy for the poor.

    Prerequisite(s)/Course Notes:
    (Formerly Parenting, Poverty and Social Policy.)


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    SOC 106 - (BH) Work in the Global Economy

    Semester Hours: 3
    Periodically
    This course examines how work affects our lives as individuals, as citizens of a specific society, and as participants in a world economy. Some of the key questions to be addressed in the course include: What is the relationship between work and power? Why do so many people feel alienated at work? Do people benefit equally from work? What is the role of technology in shaping how people work? The course attempts to address these issues by looking at work and labor relations in the United States and comparing them to conditions in other sectors of the world economy.

    Prerequisite(s)/Course Notes:
    (Formerly (BH) Work, Alienation, and Power in Social Life.)


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    SOC 107 - (BH) Organizational Structure and Process

    Semester Hours: 3
    Periodically
    Most people spend the majority of their active lives in the context of some organizational setting. Organizations are such a dominant component of contemporary life that we take their presence for granted. At the same time, most people have only a vague understanding of organizational relations. This course focuses on the nature of organizations and the social, economic, technological, and political factors that shape them. Topics include the relationships among organizational size, technology and structure; power within and between organizations; the politics of decision-making and leadership; the impact of environmental factors; and organizational goals and effectiveness.


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    SOC 132 - Independent Fieldwork and Research Internship

    Semester Hours: 1-4
    Fall, Spring
    Independent research internships and field placements in areas of sociological study. Fieldwork and internships are designed to enhance students’ practical exposure to and understanding of applied sociological analysis.

    Prerequisite(s)/Course Notes:
    Permission of chairperson. For each semester hour of credit earned, students will work a minimum of 28 hours on-site in addition to completing a minimum of 10 hours of academic work that will include reading, research, and a final paper or project that situates the internship experience within the broader framework of the academic study of criminology. Also required are a minimum of three meetings with a faculty adviser.


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    SOC 142 - (BH) Global Cities: Politics and Social Change in Comparative Perspective

    Semester Hours: 3
    Periodically
    This course compares the impact of global economic change on the world’s most powerful cities in the last fifteen years. The first half of the course focuses on how economic change has affected the social and political lives of the residents of New York and London. The second half looks at the way other cities (e.g., Paris, Berlin, Tokyo, Hong Kong, Singapore, and Los Angeles) handle the challenges of globalization and assesses what lessons their fate holds for New York and London. Course is designed to introduce students to the problems and opportunities created by the growth of a world economy and its consequences for the people, politics, and social structures of large cities.


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    SOC 145 - (BH) Building Strong Communities: Organizing in Diverse Settings

    Semester Hours: 3
    Periodically

    This course will explore the meaning of “community” and how people work together to solve collective problems.  We will examine how local organizing, advocacy, service provision, and economic revitalization can contribute to community development, empowerment, and efficacy among residents.  While the course will focus on local and regional initiatives, we will consider how the local interacts with social movements and policymaking at the state and national scales. We will also examine how networks created through migration and technologies like social media are reshaping our understandings of community itself. 


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    SOC 153 - (BH) Sociology of Human Rights

    Semester Hours: 3
    Periodically
    This course undertakes a sociological study of human rights theory and practice at the local, national, and global levels. We consider theoretical perspectives on human rights, discussing competing definitions and concepts, barriers to consensus, and the possibility of universal rights. We will pay particular attention to cultural factors affecting understandings of human rights norms, practices, and policies. Our discussions will also include reflections upon the relationship between social science methods and human rights. The course focuses on the difficulty of translating theory and methods into human rights practice and policies that actually influence people’s lives for the better.

    Prerequisite(s)/Course Notes:
    NONE


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    SOC 181 - Research Methods in Sociology

    Semester Hours: 4
    Fall, Spring
    Covers the fundamental issues associated with research in the social sciences. Topics include research design, conceptualization and measurement, reliability, validity, and sampling designs. Principal techniques of data collection in sociology including experiments, surveys, participant observation, and content analysis are examined. The ability to communicate sociological concepts and methodological issues in oral form will be emphasized and assessed. Laboratory exercises include work on data collection techniques, computer use for data entry and analysis, and the ability to communicate research results in written and oral forms. (3 hours lecture, 2 hour laboratory.)

    Prerequisite(s)/Course Notes:
    SOC 180  or permission of instructor.


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    SOC 187 A-Z - (BH) Special Topics

    Semester Hours: 3


    Fall, Spring
    Course deals with innovative topics.

    Current Special Topics

    SOC 187J (WI), CRN 94151: (BH) Race at Hofstra: Interrogating Ourselves

    From the promise of President Obama’s “post-racial era” to the rising rates of racially motivated hate crimes in the past two years, race remains a central issue in the contemporary United States. In the context of these rapidly changing national dynamics, this course will explore how these themes manifest in race relations on campus. The first portion of the class will review the existing literature in order to provide contextual background. Students will then identify core issues on campus that they wish to understand, and they will research those topics using qualitative methods (including ethnographic observation, interviewing, and/or focus groups). Class discussions will encourage collaborative understanding and analysis. Students who sign up for the class should have a genuine and open-minded interest in exploring the idea of race and be prepared to delve into the research strategies that will enable us to accomplish this objective.

    Prerequisite(s)/Course Notes:
    May be repeated for credit when topics vary. As individual subjects are selected, each is assigned a letter (A-Z) which is affixed to the course number. Specific titles and course descriptions for special topics courses are available in the online class schedule. (Formerly SOC 187.)


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Spanish (SPAN)

  
  
  
  
  
  
  
  
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    SPAN 101 - Spanish for Business and the Commercial World

    Semester Hours: 3
    Periodically
    This is a communicative-based course designed to help professionals in the business and commercial world, and pre-professionals preparing for employment in these areas, allowing them to develop real-life Spanish language skills. Classes will focus on a wide range of professional situations, including seeking employment, business travel, sales and marketing, telephone and office etiquette, correspondence, banking and finance, manufacturing, marketing, laws and regulations, e-commerce technology, etc. Individual practice, oral and written, will be enhanced by the development of topical vocabularies for specific professional uses: terms and translations covering banking, labor and management, transportation, and electronic database among others. All readings and discussions will be in Spanish.

    Prerequisite(s)/Course Notes:
    SPAN 004  or permission of the instructor. May not be taken on Pass/D+/D/Fail basis. (Formerly SPAN 121, Language and Form in the Commercial World.)


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    SPAN 102 - Spanish for the Health Professions

    Semester Hours: 3
    Periodically
    This course provides students with the specific Spanish language skills and terminology essential for working effectively with Spanish-speaking patients and health professionals. It will be particularly useful for future physicians, nurses, EMTs, medical attendants and lab technicians. The course will also cover the vocabulary of fields such as dentistry, ophthalmology, psychiatry and counseling. Students will acquire the vocabulary, grammar, and oral and written skills necessary for medical professionals and will enhance their ability to engage with diverse cultural attitudes towards health, well-being, and the body.

    Prerequisite(s)/Course Notes:
    SPAN 004  or permission of instructor. May not be taken on Pass/D+/D/ Fail basis.
     


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