Nov 29, 2021  
2016-2017 Graduate Studies Bulletin 
    
2016-2017 Graduate Studies Bulletin [ARCHIVED BULLETIN]

Learning and Teaching, Doctoral Program (EdD) in


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Professor Torff, Graduate Program Director, 516-463-5803

Leading to the degree of Doctor of Education (EdD), the Doctoral Program in Learning and Teaching prepares students to work as educational researchers, curriculum developers, teacher educators, and mentor teachers in schools and other educational settings. Students will generate, apply, and disseminate theory, research, and instructional materials to inform curriculum development and teacher education. The program enables students to acquire broad and deep knowledge of studies of learning and teaching, gain research skills with quantitative and qualitative methods, and complete a specialized program of studies in their area of expertise. The program also enables students to design and implement dissertation projects that contribute to the knowledge base in studies of learning and teaching and have practical applications for schools and other educational settings.

Scholarship assistance is available based on a combination of financial need and academic excellence.

Students may enroll on a part-time or full-time basis. Practicing educators who plan to continue working during their doctoral studies are encouraged to apply. In the fall and spring semesters, students travel to campus one day per week, typically Wednesdays, with one course at 4:30 p.m. and another at 6:30 p.m. Summer and winter courses also are available. Even on a part-time basis, the program can be completed in four years or less.

Only 10 to 12 applicants are accepted each year, allowing faculty to provide extensive mentorship for doctoral students.

Application for Admission


Apply before May 1 for admission in the subsequent fall semester. Applications completed after May 1 will be considered late and will be reviewed only if there are openings.

Admission Requirements


  1. A completed application form. An application form completed online.
  2. Official transcripts of all graduate and undergraduate course work. Applicants must hold master’s and bachelor’s degrees from accredited institutions. Either the bachelor’s or master’s degree must closely relate to the doctoral specialization sought by the applicant. A minimum grade-point average (GPA) of 3.5 in graduate course work and 3.0 in undergraduate course work is required. Student copies of transcripts must be uploaded to the application website. Official transcripts must be sent to Hofstra’s Graduate Admission Office.
  3. An official report of scores on the GRE. Register online. Student copies of score reports must be uploaded to the application website. Applicants need to request that official score reports by submitted to Hofstra’s Graduate Admission Office.
  4. A typed statement of intent and rationale for pursuing doctoral studies (500-1000 words). This statement must be uploaded to the application website.
  5. Three professional references from individuals who can attest to the applicant’s potential for doctoral studies. These references should use the program’s recommendation form, which is available on the program’s website, from the graduate program director, and from Graduate Admission. The forms should be mailed to the graduate program director.
  6. A minimum of two years of successful full-time teaching experience or the equivalent.
  7. Interview and on-site writing task (scheduled after all other admissions materials have been received).

Program admissions reflect the belief that no single criterion reliably predicts applicants’ potential for success in the program.  Prospective applicants are encouraged to apply if they do not meet one or more criteria but believe that other aspects of their experience might compensate.  However, since many factors are considered in the selection process, meeting application criteria does not ensure admission to the program.

Graduation Requirements


  1. Completion of the required 60 semester hours with a minimum cumulative GPA of 3.5.  
  2. Satisfaction of residency requirements for doctoral studies at Hofstra University.
  3. Successful completion of a Qualifying Examination.
  4. Completion of a satisfactory Qualifying Paper Proposal and Qualifying Paper.
  5. Completion of a satisfactory dissertation proposal and dissertation.
  6. Satisfactory performance in an Oral Examination administered following completion of the dissertation.
  7. Students must maintain a minimum GPA of 3.5 each semester, receive no more than one course grade of C or lower per semester, and receive no more than three C’s or lower in the EdD program.  Students who fail to meet any of these requirements will be dismissed from the program.
  8. If a student earns a grade of C-, D+, or D in a course, the instructor of the course will inform the Program Director, who will convene a meeting with the student’s adviser to discuss the circumstances under which the grade was earned.  If this is the first C-, D+, or D earned during the student’s course of study, the student will be placed on probation and the Adviser will develop a remedial plan for the student.  In such a case, course credit will not count toward the degree but the grade will be included in the student’s GPA, and the course or its equivalent must be repeated. A second grade of C-, D+, or D received in any course while enrolled in the program is grounds for dismissal.
  9. A grade of F in any course is grounds for dismissal from the program.
  10. Students are expected to behave in an ethical and professional manner according to the guidelines for student conduct and academic honesty at Hofstra University and the School of Education. Satisfactory interpersonal behavior and professional performance at all times is expected. If a report is received concerning an ethics violation or an incident of inappropriate behavior as defined by the Judicial Code, established University procedures will be followed to investigate the issue and determine the course of action. 

Advisement and Plan of Studies


Upon entering the program, the student is assigned an adviser, a full-time faculty member with expertise in the student’s area of specialization. Assignments are made by agreement of the student, faculty member, and program director. Students may change advisers upon approval of the new adviser and the program director.

The adviser will assist the student in completing the Doctoral Plan of Studies, a document indicating how and when the student will complete program requirements. The Doctoral Plan of Studies also indicates how the student will fulfill the program’s residency requirements, which mandate that students enroll for at least 6 s.h. of course work in each of the first three semesters of the program and participate in colloquia and special events offered by the Department of Teaching, Learning and Technology 

A total of 12 s.h. in related course work will be considered for transfer credit, subject to approval by the student’s adviser and the program director. Credits previously applied to an academic degree are typically not approved for transfer credit. Should a student have previously completed course work that the adviser and program director deem similar to course work required in the doctoral program, the student will be permitted to substitute alternative courses (with approval of the adviser and program director).

Program Requirements


The doctoral program is comprised of two phases: the qualifying phase and the candidacy phase.

Phase I - Qualifying


Learning and Teaching Component - Semester Hours: 18 (including elective below.)


Research Methods Component - Semester Hours: 12-15 (including electives in Research Methods, below.)


Electives in Research Methods (with advisement) - Semester Hours: 0-3


Internship Component - Semester Hours: 3


Specialization Component - Semester Hours: 15-18


Course work, with advisement, in one of the following areas of specialization within either Interdisciplinary Studies or Single-Subject Studies.

I. Interdisciplinary Studies

Human Development and Educational Psychology


Integrated Instruction in Mathematics, Science, and Technology


II. Single-Subject Studies


Art Education


Physical Education


Science Education


Note:


Course work in the Research Methods Component (12-15 s.h.) and Specialization Component (15-18 s.h.) must total 30 s.h.  The student’s adviser or the Program Director may require additional specialization course work as needed. 

Qualifying Procedures


Phase 1 also requires students to satisfactorily complete qualifying procedures including a Qualifying Examination, a Qualifying Paper Proposal (1,000-1,500 words), and a Qualifying Paper (7,500-10,000 words). Prior to undertaking these qualifying procedures, students must complete a minimum of 30 s.h. of course work including: CT 360 , 361 , 362 , 363 , 400 ; RES 260  and 263 ; and 9 s.h. of course work in the Specialization Component. 

The Qualifying Component begins when the student appoints a three-member Doctoral Committee comprised of the student’s adviser and two other individuals (subject to approval of the adviser and Program Director). Full-time faculty in the School of Education  are eligible to serve on Doctoral Committees; other members may be appointed with the approval of the adviser and Program Director.

The Qualifying Examination includes questions relating to the courses in the Learning and Teaching Component, Research Methods Component, and Specialization Component. It is given annually in December and May. Approval of all three members of the Doctoral Committee is required for the student to pass the Qualifying Examination. Students who fail the Qualifying Examination may take it again, but they must pass on the second attempt to remain matriculated in the program. 

Procedures for completion of the requirements for the Qualifying Paper Proposal and Qualifying Paper are as follows:

  1. The student submits a Qualifying Paper Proposal to the adviser. 
  2. With the adviser’s consent, the student submits the Qualifying Paper Proposal to the full Doctoral Committee.
  3. Upon approval of the Qualifying Paper Proposal by all members of the Doctoral Committee, the student is eligible to begin work on the Qualifying Paper.
  4. The student submits the Qualifying Paper to the adviser.
  5. With the adviser’s consent, the student submits the Qualifying Paper to the full Doctoral Committee.
  6. Completion of the Qualifying Paper requires the approval of all members of the Doctoral Committee.

To remain matriculated in the program, students must complete a satisfactory Qualifying Paper within one year following completion of the Qualifying Examination.  The adviser may require students to enroll in CT 351  and 352  to complete the Qualifying Paper Proposal and/or Qualifying Paper.

Phase II - Candidacy - Semester Hours: 60


  • Semester Hours: 3
  •   Semester Hours: 3
  • ††   Semester Hours: 3 (if necessary)
  • †††   Semester Hours: 3
  • ††††   Semester Hours: 3 (if necessary)
  •  

    - Students may enroll in this course for a total of two semesters, pending completion of a satisfactory Dissertation Proposal; three credits will be applied toward the degree when the Dissertation Proposal has been approved.

    †† - For students who have not completed a satisfactory Dissertation Proposal in CT 602; no credit will be applied toward the degree.

    ††† - Students may enroll in this course for a total of three semesters depending completion of a satisfactory dissertation; three credits will be applied toward the degree when the dissertation has been approved.

    †††† - For students who have not completed a satisfactory Dissertation in CT 604; no credit will be applied toward the degree.

Dissertation Proposal


Prior to enrollment in CT 601  at the outset of the Phase II, students must complete all Qualifying Procedures and 48 s.h. of course work, including CT 500  and all courses in the Learning and Teaching Component. Following successful completion of CT 601, students enroll in CT 602  and begin work on the Dissertation Proposals (5,000-10,000 words). Students may enroll in CT 602 a maximum of two times. Students who do not complete a satisfactory Dissertation Proposal in CT 602 must enroll in CT 603 . Students must complete a satisfactory Dissertation Proposal by the end of CT 603 to remain matriculated in the program. If a student must interrupt work toward the degree, he/she may request a waiver but must maintain matriculation (see Academic Policies and Procedures ).

Procedures for approval of a Dissertation Proposal are as follows:

  1. The student submits the Dissertation Proposal to the adviser.
  2. With the adviser’s consent, the student submits the Dissertation Proposal to the full Dissertation Committee. The student and Doctoral Committee may arrange a meeting to facilitate the development of the Dissertation Proposal.
  3. Upon approval of the Dissertation Proposal by all members of the Dissertation Committee (and Hofstra’s Institutional Review Board), the student is eligible to enroll in CT 604  and begin work on the Dissertation. 

Dissertation and Oral Examination


As students complete the Dissertation work, they enroll in CT 604  a maximum of three times. Students who do not satisfactorily complete a Dissertation and Oral Examination in CT 604  must enroll in CT 605 .  Students who are unable to satisfactorily complete a Dissertation and Oral Examination by the end of CT 605  will be dismissed from the program. If a student must interrupt work towards the degree, he/she must request a waiver but must maintain matriculation (see Academic Policies and Procedures ).

Procedures for completion of the Dissertation and Oral Examination are as follows:

  1. The student submits the Dissertation to the Adviser.
  2. With the approval of the Adviser and Program Director, the student appoints two Examiners who will join the Dissertation Committee in reviewing and approving the Dissertation and Oral Examination.
  3. With the Adviser’s consent, the student submits the Dissertation to the full Dissertation Committee and the Examiners. 
  4. Upon preliminary approval of the Dissertation by a majority among the members of the Dissertation Committee and the Examiners, the Oral Examination is held.  This examination is focused on the results of the study, the student’s interpretation of the results, and the student’s dissemination plan. 
  5. Upon approval of the Oral Examination and final approval of the Dissertation by a majority among the members of the Dissertation Committee and the Examiners, the student is awarded the degree of Doctor of Education (EdD). 

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